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Sous Vide Turkey

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On 11/22/2017 at 10:13 AM, delcecchi said:

 At least you aren't making spurious allegations of food safety issues.  

Feel free to explain how you keep food out of the danger zone while using sous vide when you are cooking at temperatures in the danger zone for many hours. :confused:

Quote

Danger zone (food safety)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The temperature range in which food-borne bacteria can grow is known as the danger zone. Food safety agencies, such as the United States' Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS), define the danger zone as roughly 4 to 60 °C (39 to 140 °F).[1][2][3] The FSIS stipulates that potentially hazardous food should not be stored at temperatures in this range in order to prevent foodborne illness (for example, a refrigerator's temperature must be kept below 4 °C (40 °F)[4]), and that food that remains in this zone for more than two hours should not be consumed.[5] Foodborne microorganisms grow much faster in the middle of the zone, at temperatures between 21 and 47 °C (70 and 117 °F).[6]

Food-borne bacteria, in large enough numbers, may cause food poisoning, symptoms similar to gastroenteritis or "stomach flu" (a misnomer, as true influenza primarily affects the respiratory system). Some of the symptoms include stomach cramps, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and fever.[7] Food-borne illness becomes more dangerous in certain populations, such as people with weakened immune systems, young children, the elderly, and pregnant women.[7] In Canada, there are approximately 11 million cases of food-borne disease per year.[8] These symptoms can begin as early as shortly after and as late as weeks after consumption of the contaminated food.[9]

Time and temperature control plays a critical role in food safety. To prevent time-temperature abuse, the amount of time food spends in the danger zone must be minimized.[10] A logarithmic relationship exists between microbial cell death and temperature: a significantly large number of cells may survive slightly lower temperatures.[11] In addition to reducing the time spent in the danger zone, foods should be moved through the danger zone as few times as possible when reheating or cooling.[12]

 

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On 11/22/2017 at 4:03 PM, delcecchi said:

Easiest way to do that is sous vide.  Seal in bag, throw in 120 degree water.  Go watch tv and drink a beer or other beverage of your choice, come back when you are ready and it is perfect. 

 

Wasting water?   Are you serious?   Of all the reasons, that is the worst.

Easist way is to have someone else cook it. If you like using 3x the cooking equipment and taking that long to do it by all means but this isn't exactly reinventing the wheel. And if you don't mind the food poisoning Russian roulette then it's probably just the thing for you. 

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Nah, if they want to ignore science, not do their own research on pasteuization, and blindly follow the government's dumbed down dictum I am not going to worry about it.

I presume they eat their burgers well done and their eggs hard anyway.

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1 hour ago, delcecchi said:

Nah, if they want to ignore science, not do their own research on pasteuization, and blindly follow the government's dumbed down dictum I am not going to worry about it.

I presume they eat their burgers well done and their eggs hard anyway.

I deep fried a wild turkey yesterday to almost the recommended temp and thought it was way over done and on the verge of being a waste.  My wife thought it was great.

I carved the domestic turkey in the roaster before the magic button popped and temp was barely140.  It was fantastic.  My wife was apprehensive but had to agree it was just right.

I m slowly getting her off the “It ain’t cooked till it’s brown all the way through”.

 

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3 hours ago, delcecchi said:

Nah, if they want to ignore science, not do their own research on pasteuization, and blindly follow the government's dumbed down dictum I am not going to worry about it.

Who's the one here who argues in favor of the FDA every chance he gets?

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4 hours ago, delcecchi said:

Nah, if they want to ignore science, not do their own research on pasteuization, and blindly follow the government's dumbed down dictum I am not going to worry about it.

I presume they eat their burgers well done and their eggs hard anyway.

Well since Del once again can't be bothered to provide supporting evidence to his own arguments I thought I would do it for him, again. If anyone here is really interested in sous vide cooking I would suggest reading this:  http://www.douglasbaldwin.com/sous-vide.html. This is probably about as comprehensive a guide to souse vide as you will find and the first part about food safety is very interesting and explains what Del couldn't.

At this point I personally don't think the method is for me but I would keep an open mind and would like to taste some of the food produced by souse vide sometime.(hint) If you like to figure out mathematical equations in order to keep you and your family safe and tenderness is your one and only consideration when cooking a meal then sous vide may be for you. For me I love that smoky grilled flavor I get from cooking over fire or coals. 

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Method 1-

Take a steak.

Put in a bag. Season, marinate etc.

Get plastic container and fill with water to recommended level.

Vacuum seal the bag

Plop said bag in the water

Add glorified fish tank heater

Set temp and walk away until you hit the desired internal temp.

Pull bag.

Start grill or frying pan

Cut bag,dump steak in the pan or on the grill.

Cook steak until done

Clean up grill or pan

Dump out water

Wash water pan

Put away vacuum sealer.

 

Method 2

Start pan or grill

Season steak

Cook steak

Eat steak

Wash pan or grill

Relax.

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34 minutes ago, PurpleFloyd said:

Method 1-

Take a steak.

Put in a bag. Season, marinate etc.

Get plastic container and fill with water to recommended level.

Vacuum seal the bag

Plop said bag in the water

Add glorified fish tank heater

Set temp and walk away until you hit the desired internal temp.

Pull bag.

Start grill or frying pan

Cut bag,dump steak in the pan or on the grill.

Cook steak until done

Clean up grill or pan

Dump out water

Wash water pan

Put away vacuum sealer.

 

Method 2

Start pan or grill

Season steak

Cook steak

Eat steak

Wash pan or grill

Relax.

I get what you are getting at but I couldn't care less about a person's choice of cooking method and whether it has more or less steps. The fact is I do things in cooking quite often that might not be the simplest way to achieve the results but I do it how I like it. As we speak I have a beef roast in one of those over-cooking crock pots that Del hates. It was easy, put roast and a couple other ingredients into the pot and turn it on, simple. But sometimes I like to take a piece of meat and marinade it or brine it then maybe inject it then rub it with a bunch of seasonings I mix together then light some charcoals, then dump lit charcoals on top of unlit charcoals then wait for temperature to be at optimal level then put meat on grill then check temp every half hour, then baste from time to time, then possibly foil, then possibly unfoil, then cook some more, then sauce, then let rest......you get the picture:D

My main problem with souse vide is that I would never be certain I wasn't poisoning myself or my family.

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