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      Members Only Fluid Forum View   08/08/2017

      Fluid forum view allows members only to get right to the meat of this community; the topics. You can toggle between your preferred forum view just below to the left on the main forum entrance. You will see three icons. Try them out and see what you prefer.   Fluid view allows you, if you are a signed up member, to see the newest topic posts in either all forums (select none or all) or in just your favorite forums (select the ones you want to see when you come to Fishing Minnesota). It keeps and in real time with respect to Topic posts and lets YOU SELECT YOUR FAVORITE FORUMS. It can make things fun and easy. This is especially true for less experienced visitors raised on social media. If you, as a members want more specific topics, you can even select a single forum to view. Let us take a look at fluid view in action. We will then break it down and explain how it works in more detail.   The video shows the topic list and the forum filter box. As you can see, it is easy to change the topic list by changing the selected forums. This view replaces the traditional list of categories and forums.   Of course, members only can change the view to better suit your way of browsing.   You will notice a “grid” option. We have moved the grid forum theme setting into the main forum settings. This makes it an option for members only to choose. This screenshot also shows the removal of the forum breadcrumb in fluid view mode. Fluid view remembers your last forum selection so you don’t lose your place when you go back to the listing. The benefit of this feature is easy to see. It removes a potential barrier of entry for members only. It puts the spotlight on topics themselves, and not the hierarchical forum structure. You as a member will enjoy viewing many forums at once and switching between them without leaving the page. We hope that fluid view, the new functionality is an asset that you enjoy .
rl_sd

Finally pulled it out of the barn...

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The year is 1993. I was a young pup of 12 years old with nothing but piss and vinegar rolling through my veins. Dad had an old sno jet growing up that I took a few rides on years before, but I really wanted to have a snowmobile to ride of my own. Dad said first things first.... you need to go through a snowmobile safety course . So, after a day of class and a driving test I was ready to start looking for sleds to spend my allowance on. A handful of my buddies had sleds... mostly early 80s jags and tnts. Little did I know that dad had already found something. The neighbor had an old cat in the barn that hadn't ran for about 10 years. After a carb rebuilding and a crankshaft seal dad had it running and waiting for me after I got back from my training course. It was a 1971 Puma 399 Koehler in awesome shape. Although it wasn't near as streamlined and sexy as my buddies sleds, it was mine and I was in love. Back then, putting on 50 miles in a day seem like a year long expedition. Typical of many sleds in that era, there were bound to be mechanical problems.... especially when driven hard by a kid, But dad was a mechanic by trade and took the effort to teach me along the way. It was through working on the sled that I learned the common motto " all an engine needs to run is spark, air and fuel". I road the ole' Puma for about 4 years before moving onto something different (not better), but dad and I still went on a few rides together after we had two sleds. As time went on, the Puma fell to the wayside. It sat in the back of the garage for a number of years, until being moved to the old car shed in about 1998. Now, the car shed was exactly much of a structure when when put the AC in there nearly 20 years ago. Leaky roof, mice, dust and dirt floor the 399 stood through it all. Late this past summer dad mentioned that the shed probably wasn't gonna last much longer and we got talking about the rides we took and work we did on it. I told dad that I wanted to get it out and at least start tinkering on it. Dad said that there probably wasn't much left of it due to the environment that it had spent the last 20 years in, but I decided that it was still worth a shot. Last weekend I took the 100 mile drives, trailer in tow, to see what was left. For the most part everything was still there. The seat had seen better days, but it wasn't missing any foam. As I walked around the sled, a few things caught my eye.... a ding here and a rivet there where we had to do some "reinforcing" after I got back from one of my epic journeys....all good memories.  Instantly I knew it was coming home with me. As I drove the 100 miles back, I would look in the rear view mirror and have though running through my mind... "What if the mice ate all the wires? What if the crank shaft seals are gone? How much money am I going to throw at this? Is it really worth it?" Meanwhile, my wife knew that I was heading back home to pick up "a snowmobile". When I pulled into our driveway, the look on her face made me realize that I may not have been totally forth coming with all the fact regarding the machine that I was going to retrieve. This sled was obviously MUCH different than the other three that we own. My boys on the other hand (5 & 7 years old) thought that this old machine was really cool, especially as I told them stories about how I road it when I was young. Either way, it was time to start dusting it off and getting my hands dirty. 

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So... back to the knowledge I learned from dad many years back.... air, fuel, and spark. It was clear that the carb was going to need to be rebuilt before I started to even think about air and fuel, but how about spark? Out came the plugs, and in went the screw driver on the plug boots. Pull, pull, pull... nothing- darn, maybe I should have left it in the shed. Out came the multi meter... I have power to the external coils. Off came the recoil, shroud, and exhaust. I don't know how many mice had made that engine bay there home over the years, but they had it PACKED full of leaves, dirt, and other random dump. After a quick cleaning with the shop vac, off came the fly wheel. Things were relatively clean around the charging foils and condensers. But wait, there is the points... totally corroded. BINGO!  After a few passes with some emery cloth I now have spark. Major win!

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So now that I have one of the three major components taken care of, it is time to look at the remaking two... air and fuel. Now I have done quite a bit of tinkering with carbs in the past on lawn mowers, chain saws, etc... but most of them were mikuni's and this tillotson was a completely different animal. Luckily I am pretty handy with the google machine and you tube can explain anything you want to know.... on with the carb rebuilding

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Now unfortunately, that is where I am going to leave the story for now.... primarily because the tank needs some major cleaning and I have to grab a few feet of new fuel line. BUT, I couldn't go to bed tonight with out knowing.... can this relic still really run? A cap ful of fuel down the intake, a pull on the rope and the garage instantly filled with the smell of burning mouse droppings with a hint of two stroke oil. INSTANT SMILE! I could even feel the pulse port working, so I think the crankshaft seals are still in working shapes. Stay tuned... I am hoping to have another update at the end of weekend. 

Edited by rl_sd

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24 minutes ago, Walleyehooker said:

Brings back memories. Back then you almost had to be young to ride one with zero suspension and most of the trails were like wash boards. 

Trails? Unfortunately, the closest thing that we had in western MN for trails was running the river after a fresh snow. Everything else was ditch rodeo! I am actually excited to finally ride it a bit on the trails. It seemed like a rough ride at age 14.... now that the joints are stiffer and the gut hangs a bit lower I am sure that it will really ride like a rock!

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It will be fun to watch how you fix it up and bring it back to running condition.  Keep posting updates please.

Don't forget the check the exhaust pipe out for blockages. 

I picked up an old Yamaha sled once many years ago for cheap. The guy said that it wouldn't run when the exhaust pipe was on but once he unbolted the front from the motor it would run?? "Light bulb" moment. :confused:

I bought the sled took off the exhaust pipe and muffler and shook out a coffee can full of dog food=mice!  Ran like a top after that! :)

Air boxes are another great stash spot for mice but I don't think that one has an air box.

Edited by leech~~

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1 hour ago, leech~~ said:

It will be fun to watch how you fix it up and bring it back to running condition.  Keep posting updates please.

Don't forget the check the exhaust pipe out for blockages. 

I picked up an old Yamaha sled once many years ago for cheap. The guy said that it wouldn't run when the exhaust pipe was on but once he unbolted the front from the motor it would run?? "Light bulb" moment. :confused:

I bought the sled took off the exhaust pipe and muffler and shook out a coffee can full of dog food=mice!  Ran like a top after that! :)

Air boxes are another great stash spot for mice but I don't think that one has an air box.

Thanks leech. As I said, it has too many dings and rivets to be in any vintage shows, but it is good enough for some vintage rides and will be good enough for my oldest to ride in a few years.

I figured with as much nesting material that I found under the fan cowl that the pipe would be packed full. To my surprise, it blew out clean. Your are right... no airbox on this one - just a foam filter sticking up through the hood.

 

 

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1 hour ago, Walleyehooker said:

Looks like its mostly there and a lot of polishing and cleaning will go a long way. A new leopard seat skin and should be a pretty cool sled. One thing nice about the old sleds there wasn't a lot to them.

Well.... I found a new old stock seat cover.... just can't justify dropping $300 on one! I plan on doing a little spit shinning and will prob recover the old seat in plain vinyl

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Well, I had planned on cleaning out the tank, but I had to see whether or not the carb rebuild was successful. So, I took the inlet/outlet bung from the tank and rigged it up to a Gatorade bottle filled with premix. She took off first pull, but only ran for about 5 seconds and died. Well... at least it is pumping gas. The first thing I noticed was gas running out of the pulse line. Off came the carb. Tillotson carbs.... what a crazy invention! Gasket, plate, diaphragm, plate, gasket, diaphragm, plate....on and on and on.  I should know.... I had it apart 5 times tonight! Each time I reassembled it, it carefully studied the print out of which piece went where. Just when I was ready to throw in the towel I figured it out.... the pivot shaft that holds the inlet control lever was out of place and allowing fuel to come in unrestricted. 

And the final result?

 

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