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    • Rick

      Members Only Fluid Forum View   08/08/2017

      Fluid forum view allows members only to get right to the meat of this community; the topics. You can toggle between your preferred forum view just below to the left on the main forum entrance. You will see three icons. Try them out and see what you prefer.   Fluid view allows you, if you are a signed up member, to see the newest topic posts in either all forums (select none or all) or in just your favorite forums (select the ones you want to see when you come to Fishing Minnesota). It keeps and in real time with respect to Topic posts and lets YOU SELECT YOUR FAVORITE FORUMS. It can make things fun and easy. This is especially true for less experienced visitors raised on social media. If you, as a members want more specific topics, you can even select a single forum to view. Let us take a look at fluid view in action. We will then break it down and explain how it works in more detail.   The video shows the topic list and the forum filter box. As you can see, it is easy to change the topic list by changing the selected forums. This view replaces the traditional list of categories and forums.   Of course, members only can change the view to better suit your way of browsing.   You will notice a “grid” option. We have moved the grid forum theme setting into the main forum settings. This makes it an option for members only to choose. This screenshot also shows the removal of the forum breadcrumb in fluid view mode. Fluid view remembers your last forum selection so you don’t lose your place when you go back to the listing. The benefit of this feature is easy to see. It removes a potential barrier of entry for members only. It puts the spotlight on topics themselves, and not the hierarchical forum structure. You as a member will enjoy viewing many forums at once and switching between them without leaving the page. We hope that fluid view, the new functionality is an asset that you enjoy .
Papa Bear

Fish House rv Build

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Still pluggin away on our shack. This part of the process has seemed painfully slow, I'm sure mostly because I'm anxious to get it out on the ice. Was up till 1 last night laminating the counters and spraying the last of the doors and drawer fronts. The cabinets were sprayed in place along with the walls and ceiling with sanding sealer and then 2 coats of lacquer. Not a fun process when all the windows are taped off and the door is closed to keep the heat in! Respirator couldn't quite keep up. Either way, it's done now and turned out. IMG_2544.thumb.JPG.e90de43041abf68b20c8e2b8263a0682.JPG

 

IMG_2543.thumb.JPG.2eb2e5c093536874095228a945e83600.JPG

 

 

Pile o' drawers. I built these a little different than I've done in the past. Instead of plywood, the sides are made of pine planed down to 1/2" and biscuited. The bottoms are leftover cedar planking. I ended up finding some "push-to-open" type drawer slides that latch like the door catches fishnfan shared above.

IMG_2532.thumb.JPG.0241ed593f61e5d5f780f7444d8baf49.JPG

 

 

Bathroom pocket door. Pine frame and the same cedar planks used on everything else.

IMG_2533.thumb.JPG.d8bb6e41e1a8c00c867c5872deec6966.JPGIMG_2536.thumb.JPG.ab9b81b1012e222b220982a3924e3ab5.JPG

IMG_2535.thumb.JPG.79dc336d70379e4e1f979d3dbb862dde.JPG

 

 

 

Not a very good picture but wanted to kind of show how the bathroom/shower went together. The walls were covered with GoBoard which is a tile backer board with a waterproof skin and a foam core. The raised floor is the same 1" polyurethane that I used in the rest of the house. I gave the pan a slight taper towards the drain with a belt sander. If the shack isn't perfectly level some squeegeeing might be involved after use. I don't expect the shower to get much use but wanted one available if needed. The shower curb and toilet platform is raised another inch. All the joints and seams were then liberally sealed and then the pan got 3 coats of Redgard which is used for shower membranes. Then that got a coat of liquid rubber over the top. Lastly the walls are covered with thin plastic paneling. The toilet tucks back in there and the waste tank cassette pulls out the side of the house. The hole for the access door wasn't cut in yet in this picture. I didn't want to eat up a lot of space with a big bathroom but wanted to be able to S&S if nothing else was available. Hopefully this will work out.

 

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The counters; edged, sanded and ready for contact cement.

 

IMG_2537.thumb.JPG.81dc749df7a7245598b021fda75bfe84.JPG

 

 

I've never used contact cement before. I glued these up in our attached garage last night. Stunk up the whole house. I wasn't very popular this morning.

 

IMG_2541.thumb.JPG.f4cbde12ac636593784da97578e19bbc.JPG

 

 

The laminate still needs to be trimmed but I think it turned out pretty good for my first stab at laminating counters

 

IMG_2542.thumb.JPG.7f4fb8bd4815136a00813b6da41d4fba.JPG

 

Also made a little rod rack with some of the trim scraps. I swear the pink one's not mine. That's pretty much where I'm at. I'm optimistically hoping to get enough done before the weekend to take it out for a night and have some BL smoothies!

 

IMG_2526.thumb.JPG.413ead428e7c18bbc669aeebe4a866ee.JPG

 

 

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2 hours ago, Papa Bear said:

Still pluggin away on our shack. This part of the process has seemed painfully slow, I'm sure mostly because I'm anxious to get it out on the ice. Was up till 1 last night laminating the counters and spraying the last of the doors and drawer fronts. The cabinets were sprayed in place along with the walls and ceiling with sanding sealer and then 2 coats of lacquer. Not a fun process when all the windows are taped off and the door is closed to keep the heat in! Respirator couldn't quite keep up. Either way, it's done now and turned out. IMG_2544.thumb.JPG.e90de43041abf68b20c8e2b8263a0682.JPG

 

IMG_2543.thumb.JPG.2eb2e5c093536874095228a945e83600.JPG

 

 

Pile o' drawers. I built these a little different than I've done in the past. Instead of plywood, the sides are made of pine planed down to 1/2" and biscuited. The bottoms are leftover cedar planking. I ended up finding some "push-to-open" type drawer slides that latch like the door catches fishnfan shared above.

IMG_2532.thumb.JPG.0241ed593f61e5d5f780f7444d8baf49.JPG

 

 

Bathroom pocket door. Pine frame and the same cedar planks used on everything else.

IMG_2533.thumb.JPG.d8bb6e41e1a8c00c867c5872deec6966.JPGIMG_2536.thumb.JPG.ab9b81b1012e222b220982a3924e3ab5.JPG

IMG_2535.thumb.JPG.79dc336d70379e4e1f979d3dbb862dde.JPG

 

 

 

Not a very good picture but wanted to kind of show how the bathroom/shower went together. The walls were covered with GoBoard which is a tile backer board with a waterproof skin and a foam core. The raised floor is the same 1" polyurethane that I used in the rest of the house. I gave the pan a slight taper towards the drain with a belt sander. If the shack isn't perfectly level some squeegeeing might be involved after use. I don't expect the shower to get much use but wanted one available if needed. The shower curb and toilet platform is raised another inch. All the joints and seams were then liberally sealed and then the pan got 3 coats of Redgard which is used for shower membranes. Then that got a coat of liquid rubber over the top. Lastly the walls are covered with thin plastic paneling. The toilet tucks back in there and the waste tank cassette pulls out the side of the house. The hole for the access door wasn't cut in yet in this picture. I didn't want to eat up a lot of space with a big bathroom but wanted to be able to S&S if nothing else was available. Hopefully this will work out.

 

IMG_2534.thumb.JPG.7c043dd95541ff9ff907457bc2f0c825.JPG

 

The counters; edged, sanded and ready for contact cement.

 

IMG_2537.thumb.JPG.81dc749df7a7245598b021fda75bfe84.JPG

 

 

I've never used contact cement before. I glued these up in our attached garage last night. Stunk up the whole house. I wasn't very popular this morning.

 

IMG_2541.thumb.JPG.f4cbde12ac636593784da97578e19bbc.JPG

 

 

The laminate still needs to be trimmed but I think it turned out pretty good for my first stab at laminating counters

 

IMG_2542.thumb.JPG.7f4fb8bd4815136a00813b6da41d4fba.JPG

 

Also made a little rod rack with some of the trim scraps. I swear the pink one's not mine. That's pretty much where I'm at. I'm optimistically hoping to get enough done before the weekend to take it out for a night and have some BL smoothies!

 

IMG_2526.thumb.JPG.413ead428e7c18bbc669aeebe4a866ee.JPG

 

 

 

Papa Bear,

Great job! That is one awesome house. Can you tell me how thick your pocket door is, and did you recess your tongue & groove into the stiles and rail of the door. If possible could you post a photo of the back and side of the door? Again, great craftsmanship on everything!

Thanks

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23 minutes ago, Cooperman said:

 

Papa Bear,

Great job! That is one awesome house. Can you tell me how thick your pocket door is, and did you recess your tongue & groove into the stiles and rail of the door. If possible could you post a photo of the back and side of the door? Again, great craftsmanship on everything!

Thanks

Thank you, yes, the door has a 5/16 groove cut around the inside that the planks slip into and the rails then have a matching tongue. I used the same adjustable T&G cutter set for the cabinet doors, bath door, and to cut the groove for the drawer bottoms. The accent pieces on the front are just fitted between the frame, glued and brad nailed from the back. I believe the frame pieces were ~1 1/8" thick. I'll take a couple pics of the side and back of the door tonight if I remember.

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Made it out this weekend for the maiden voyage. Went well other than some trailer light issues that developed after leaving home. I'll have to pick away at that along with more of the finishing work before the weekend. Do you guys bond your + from the truck harness to the house batteries?

 

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Yesterday afternoon the wife looked out and saw this unfolding...

 

We were roughly 300 yards from this. 18" of ice where we were sitting.  Too bad this happened but hopefully it can be learned from. 

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Love the house!  My next build just may have to be an aluminum frame, depending on cost.

 

Regarding the trailer wires...are you hoping for the + from the truck to charge your house batteries?

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No, don't want to charge from the truck harness, just wondering if not having everything at the same potential would cause any issue. I didn't wire it that way, just questioning myself. All connections were soldered to prevent issues down the road and here I am troubleshooting the darn lights after the first time out. :eek: 

 

You might be surprised at the aluminum trailer cost, no finishing cost involved. 

 

Also forgot to mention...was a little disappointed after stopping at the scale. Fully loaded 5400lbs on the axles 6200lbs total. Does 800 seem like too much tongue weight to you guys? There is a lot of stuff build into this house but comparing it to the Yetti with similar features and rubber/wood roof I'm questioning what I was told they weigh. Wondering if tongue weight wasn't added. Oh well, it is what it is. 

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Trailer tongue weight should be between 10 - 15% of the weight of the trailer.  You're at 13%, perfect.  You probably couldn't have got it any better if you tried.  BTW, very nice house you built for yourself.  Very nice.

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3 hours ago, Papa Bear said:

No, don't want to charge from the truck harness, just wondering if not having everything at the same potential would cause any issue. I didn't wire it that way, just questioning myself. All connections were soldered to prevent issues down the road and here I am troubleshooting the darn lights after the first time out. :eek: 

 

You might be surprised at the aluminum trailer cost, no finishing cost involved. 

 

Also forgot to mention...was a little disappointed after stopping at the scale. Fully loaded 5400lbs on the axles 6200lbs total. Does 800 seem like too much tongue weight to you guys? There is a lot of stuff build into this house but comparing it to the Yetti with similar features and rubber/wood roof I'm questioning what I was told they weigh. Wondering if tongue weight wasn't added. Oh well, it is what it is. 

 

I've always skipped the + wire on the harness.  I like to keep systems isolated (ex: hydraulic pump, house lights, trailer lights).  It eliminates problems down the road.

 

What specific issues are you having?  I THOUGHT I was having wiring issues with mine, but it turns out it was a safety/lockout "feature" on my truck (Chevy).  

 

800 seems spot on, as does the 6200#.  Put a 21' Yetti on a scale...I've heard from multiple people that it isn't even close to what they claim.  Not to mention their hydraulic system is janky.  

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Thanks for the info guys! Haven't pinned down the light problem yet but it's looking like a vehicle issue. Trailer tail and left turn fuses blow when hooked to my truck but not when hooked to the wife's. More fun tonight

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Did you have to sand in between coats of lacquer? I was going to use a pre catalyzed lacquer for a little more durability, but it seems like it would take forever to get in all of the grooves. 

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13 hours ago, avidleech said:

Did you have to sand in between coats of lacquer? I was going to use a pre catalyzed lacquer for a little more durability, but it seems like it would take forever to get in all of the grooves. 

 

Just a quick sanding with a sanding sponge.  It makes a HUGE difference in the smoothness of the wood.  

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4 hours ago, Lip_Ripper Guy said:

 

Just a quick sanding with a sanding sponge.  It makes a HUGE difference in the smoothness of the wood.  

I didn't know those existed. I will give it a try. I was just using regular sand paper and was ready to quit after 15 minutes. I should have sprayed it before the wood was up. The sanding would have been a little easier at least. 

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I sprayed in place and sanded with 200 grit  random orbit between coats. Sanding sealer as the first coat isn't necessary but in my experience saves sanding time and usually ends up smoother. I didn't worry about sanding in the grooves. 

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