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YettiStyle

Finished Yetti 8x16'

12 posts in this topic

Well it's taken more time than I expected but I'm finally done with my Yetti build.  I've gotten multiple messages over the course of my build with questions so I thought I would write up a little post and share some pictures of the final layout.  If you have any questions about how I did something or why, please feel free to ask here or message me and I'll do my best to answer your questions or provide more pictures.  This forum is a great resource for all DIY's and I know personally how much of a help it can provide. 

 

 

Here is the rear of the shack.  The couch in the back has storage underneath and also extends out to create a 4x8 bed.  The green fabric in the middle is a blackout window cover that I'll get to later.  On the sides of the shack are two 30x80" bunks (I'm 6'4" and hate short mattresses).  There are latches on each side holding the bunks up but I also put those 2x4" blocks under to prevent any bouncing and help the piano hinges during transport. 

20161224_103903.jpg

 

Here is the front of the shack.  Another smaller couch up front with some storage underneath and the electrical equipment (AGM battery, shutoff switch, PD4045 power center).   The entire shack was essentially designed off the 50" TV and everything fell into place after figuring out where that would go.  The TV is mounted on an extending TV wall mount and the orange straps keep it in place during transport.  There are shelves on both the top and bottom that the TV tucks into to prevent any bouncing and stress on the TV and the wall mount during transport as well.  Up in the V of the shack is a small storage closet.  I keep all my catch cover accessories, buckets, and table tops up here.  The opening is 18" wide so it is a little narrow but still very functional.   Under the countertop is the furnace as well as a fridge that only gets used during the summer while camping. 

20161223_175238.jpg

 

I've done a post on these before but I'll repeat it again just because I think it is very useful.  I used regular LED strips (basically tape with LED elements embedded on) to make recessed hole lights.  Each side operates independently with switches in the middle of the wheel wells.  These give off the perfect amount of light and really give the shack a professional look.  You can also get the led strips in RGB and UV, I personally preferred the Daylight LED.  You can also see the two pedestal holes in the floor.  I have a two piece table that I store in the closet.  Each piece is 30x36".  I can install them independently or together to create a 30x72" table for playing cards with a large group.  I can try and get pictures later if anyone wants them. 

20161224_103951.jpg

 

 

I also used the same concept in the "kitchen" for a little accent lighting when everyone is sleeping or there is a movie on. 

20161224_104016.jpg

 

One of the gadgets I used that I would highly recommend is this touch dimmable light switch (found on amazon).  It controls my 3 ceiling lights and gives me the capability to brighten/dim the ceiling lights.  This is the master switch and controls all 3 lights, each switch has it's own independent switch so I can turn all 3 off/on independently.  Works great even in the coldest of temperatures (just need to take your gloves off since it is touch). 

20161224_103936.jpg

 

Here is a glimpse at my front cabinet.  This is a once piece cabinet and was a total pain to get the correct angle (around 21.5 degrees).  Bottom and sides are made of 3/4" cabinet plywood.  Face framed with 1x2" pine.  The doors are made of 1x2" cedar and cedar T&G.  As a side note, crown royal bags make great storage containers for remotes, utensils, and other odds and ends. 

20161224_104128.jpg

 

Wow, blurry picture but you'll get the point.  After last year I got tired of lifting the couch lid all the time to change movies so I build a cabinet within a cabinet.  Much easier access to the DVD player and now Xbox 360. 

20161224_104613.jpg

 

Not a fan of CD decks so I made my own surround sound system.  Top left button is the on/off switch.  Bottom left knob is the volume control.  Right switch is the input selector switch.  I can easily switch between TV audio, AUX cable (3.5 mm headphone jack), and I just installed a Bluetooth receiver as well.  There are 4 speakers in the shack powered by a 400W pioneer amp.  If the fish aren't biting I can throw one heck of a party. 

20161224_104105.jpg

 

 

Here is the furnace enclosure.  It is important to note the return air hole on top of the two duct outlets.  This allows the furnace to breathe and function as it was designed to do. 

20161224_105034.jpg

 

Here are the bunks folded down.  Still plenty of room to walk around and work underneath when a fish takes a rattle wheel.  There are two 2x4 legs that go on the outside of each bed for more support, I was just running low on time when taking the pictures.  I made all the cushions and mattresses myself from foam from the foam factory online.  I then brought the foam to an upholstery place to get custom covers created. 

20161224_105322.jpg

 

 

This is the outside of the window trim.  If you look closely you will see those little black dots which are actually strong pin magnets that I drilled into the edges.  These are used to hold up my blackout curtains.  (see next picture).  These magnets are around all 4 sides of the shack. 

20161224_105756.jpg

 

I then bought some blackout fabric from amazon and sewed on a top layer of Realtree duck fabric.  Inside the hem I then sewed in some small pieces of steel round bar stock.  This was a wild idea I had but it actually works better than I thought it would.  Takes 2 seconds to put up and come off even faster.  Best part is that it is completely black inside with these installed. 

20161224_105849.jpg

 

 

Since I installed my furnace in the V part of my shack I found out rather quickly that furnaces and road slush don't mix.  This was a rather simple fix.  I took a piece of sheet metal and cut it to the size of the exhaust holes.  I then used some door weather-stripping around the perimeter of the sheet metal.  (see next picture).

20161224_105937.jpg

 

Where I got lucky was that Suburban already had holes in the exhaust (I don't know if this is designed or not) but I was able to place two bolts through these holes.  I use two wing nuts to secure the cover and it takes 30 seconds on/off to protect the chamber from filling up with gravel, slush, salt, bugs, rodents.  Just don't forget to take the cover off BEFORE trying to fire up the furnace. 

20161224_110037.jpg

 

Edited by YettiStyle
Papa Bear, rundrave, Luttes and 2 others like this

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Nice job, looks great! Isn't it a proud feeling to just sit back, admire it, and think that you did it yourself? 

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20161224_104016.jpg.a86aa164472469e89c8138a3313135ee.jpg Looks amazing.  You could grow some plants in there.  Those led ropes are bright.   Reminds me of my house.20140116_174050.jpg

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Very nice! I like the curtain magnet idea

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Nice looking shack YettiStyle!

I would like it if you would post photos of your table setup. Thank for posting this, many great ideas.

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3 minutes ago, Cooperman said:

Nice looking shack YettiStyle!

I would like it if you would post photos of your table setup. Thank for posting this, many great ideas.

 

Thanks everyone!  Definitely get a little bit of a puffy chest when you spend so much time designing and finishing off these things.  I'm headed out tomorrow-Monday with the shack so I'll try and get some pictures of the tables for you.  You'll just have to mind all the beer cans...

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Looks great!

Could you put a pedestal boat seat in your table stake pocket? I like the look of the natural counter top.. Did you seal or resin it at all for protection. I was worried about the same issue with the heater in the "V",  so we made a deflector out of diamond plate that works well, and also keeps the heat away from the tank covers.

 

If anyone needs a switch, I have one identical to Yetti's except that it is made for two zones that I will sell CHEAP

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45 minutes ago, rl_sd said:

Looks great!

Could you put a pedestal boat seat in your table stake pocket? I like the look of the natural counter top.. Did you seal or resin it at all for protection. I was worried about the same issue with the heater in the "V",  so we made a deflector out of diamond plate that works well, and also keeps the heat away from the tank covers.

 

Yea, holes are the same size so it would be an option for a boat pedestal seat.  The countertops are actually just edge-glued boards that Menards supplies.  I coated them in a few coats of Minwax Polyurethane.  If I was to do it again I'd chose something different because I've noticed that they have yellowed a bit. 

 

The exhaust cover is great for keeping debris out while on the road but during the summer it is also great at keeping out rodents and bugs.  Nothing worse than trying to fire up your heater for the first time during the winter and find out you have a mouse nest or a bee hive in your chamber clogging things up. 

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Nice looking shackles Yeti

It looks like you used pine tongue and groove?

How thick is it? 3/4"

How much weight do you think it added?

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On ‎1‎/‎6‎/‎2017 at 6:11 PM, birdswacker said:

Nice looking shackles Yeti

It looks like you used pine tongue and groove?

How thick is it? 3/4"

How much weight do you think it added?

No it's 5/16" cedar T&G.  No clue how much weight it added but I used about 50ish 6-packs and it is fairly lightweight.  Final weight is around 4,200lbs loaded with propane and gear. 

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    • BEFORE BEGINNING

      Before you begin, make sure you have a good strong battery and make sure it's charged up. If you have a bad or weak battery, you may want to replace it because if it doesn't crank good and strong, you are likely to get a low, inaccurate reading. Make sure your engine is warmed up to operating temperature(if possible). About 10 minutes of riding should do.

      First, take out the spark plug and thread in the adapter for the compression tester. Make sure you have the correct size adapter for your particular ATV. Slide your kill switch to the "off" position. Some ATVs won't crank over with the kill switch in the "off" position, so if yours is like this, then you will need to either unhook your ignition coil or ground the end of the spark plug wire to a good ground. You can use a jumper wire with alligator clips on each end to ground it. Next, make sure the throttle is in the wide open position. You can either hold the throttle lever with your thumb or you may be able to tape it or use a zip tie to fasten it to your handlebars to hold it in the wide open position. If you don't have the throttle in the wide open position, you will probably get too low of a reading. Also, if you are testing a newly rebuilt engine, the engine needs to have been run for, at least, 30 or 40 minutes or you will probably get too low of a reading.

      NOTE: Before you begin with the actual test, make sure the threaded adapter is screwed in good and isn't leaking any air out around it.

      ACTUAL TESTING

      With the throttle in the wide open position, push the start button and crank the engine over until the hand on the gauge stops moving. Each time the engine turns over the hand should raise a little more until it reaches the maximum compression of the engine. When it stops, that is your compression reading. This usually takes no more than 10 seconds. Try to avoid cranking an engine for more than 10 seconds at a time as this is hard on the starter and the battery. Now, push the relief valve on your compression gauge and that will reset the hand back to zero. It's a good ideal to repeat the test a couple or three times to make sure you get an accurate reading. On kick start models, it will be the same procedure, but obviously you will be kicking it over instead of using a start button. Worn piston rings and cylinder walls will increase the number of strokes it takes to reach the maximum reading. If you're kicking, it could possibly take as many as 10-20 kicks to get the highest reading.

      THE READING

      You will need to check your repair manual for your particular model for the correct compression specifications. See note below. Usually, an engine will run OK if it has at least 100 PSI of compression. Most engines will have somewhere between 100-250 and some as high as 300 PSI, depending on the engine. Sometimes they will run with under 100 PSI, but usually not very well. If you get a low reading, you can do a "wet test" to try to help determine the problem.

      If your reading is too high, then you probably have carbon built up on your piston and combustion chamber.

      NOTE: You may get a low reading on some engines because some engines have a decompressor assembly built into the camshaft. Check the service manual for your quad to see whether or not your quad has a decompressor assembly built into the cam.

      WET TEST

      If you got a low reading, pour about 1-2 teaspoons of clean motor oil down into the cylinder through the spark plug hole and do the compression test again. If your reading increases, then your rings or cylinder walls are probably worn. If your reading doesn't increase, then it's probably your valves. You could have a bent valve, you may have leaky valve seats, or your valve clearance may not be adjusted properly. Also, low compression can be caused by a blown head gasket.

      CAUSES OF LOW COMPRESSION

      *Worn piston rings or worn or damaged cylinder walls
      *Leaking valves
      *Valve clearance not properly set
      *Blown head gasket

      CAUSE OF HIGH COMPRESSION (stock engines)

      *Carbon buildup in combustion chamber and on piston

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