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RiverChuckNorris

Ice Castle Frame Rust addressed + season prep begins

13 posts in this topic

Finally took a weekend to attack the rusty frame on my IC.  My approach was:

1. Used 3M drill mount paint and rust stripper discs (2).  This was by far the most labor intensive task.  Took about 6 hours.  It really drains the drill batteries, so make sure you have a couple good ones!

2. Wire brushed areas I couldn't reach, then wiped frame down with damp rag and taped diamond plate.

3. Put one coat of Rustoleum rust reformer automobile primer and then one coat of Rustoleum rust preventer flat black with a light sanding in between.

It was a bear of a project but I am very pleased with how it turned out as the frame was in pretty rough shape.  REALLY hope this holds up for at least 4 years.

 

Also had a chance set up my RAM mount on the sled for my Garmin 62 in between battery charges and replace some rusty screws with stainless on the snowmobile trailer.  

Now I have to figure out mounting my Digger Auger mount to the front of the sled and what I'm going to do for a gear storage system on the back of the sled.  Good start though, have the sore back/shoulders to prove it and wanted to share with someone who cares :)

 

Didn't take any good before pics unfortunately to highlight the amount of rust, but found one of my real boss with it in the background.IMG_0510.JPG 

Before

IMG_0977.JPG

AFTER!!

IMG_0975.JPG

Ram mount on sled, excited not to have to hold it and drive anymore!

Edited by RiverChuckNorris
leech~~, elkrivermn and nels8912 like this

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Looks good chuck! Out of curiosity, how come you chose rust oleum instead of the POR route that most others have went?  Mostly cost?

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14 hours ago, rl_sd said:

Looks good chuck! Out of curiosity, how come you chose rust oleum instead of the POR route that most others have went?  Mostly cost?

Hey rl - In all honesty, it simply was due to availability.  Didn't realize I'd have an open weekend to work on the project until Friday.  I think I would've had to order the POR product online vs. running over to the Fleet & Farm store.

I know guys on here swear by POR but the devil's advocate in me also likes trying things differently, in general.  After looking over the Rustoleum products, seemed purpose-made enough to give it a shot.

Maybe I'll end up regretting it, but fingers crossed it holds up as I have NO desire to do that project again anytime soon.

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my prep started with spayfoaming the under floor, cost of 350.00 well worth it.added wbeel well covers and a the bumpout window cover and 2 exrra 30lb tanks. did a propane leak check on all connectios and found 2 that soap didnt detect biut our detection device did. snuged them up good. just gota go over pivot points and wheel bearrings

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FYI you can buy POR off the shelf in the cities. The autoparts store on central just a mile up from Harbor freight carries it.

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Did you drill the frame out to let the water drain out 

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No, I wasn't aware:

  1. The frame was water tight?
  2. That there's standing water in it?

I just sanded the exterior.  I'd presume you're speaking from experience?  

I've seen guys drill holes for galvanization dips on their builds but haven't heard of drilling holes in frames otherwise.  This is going to be my 5th or 6th season with the IC and I've never heard/seen water in the frame.

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26 minutes ago, RiverChuckNorris said:

No, I wasn't aware:

  1. The frame was water tight?
  2. That there's standing water in it?

I just sanded the exterior.  I'd presume you're speaking from experience?  

I've seen guys drill holes for galvanization dips on their builds but haven't heard of drilling holes in frames otherwise.  This is going to be my 5th or 6th season with the IC and I've never heard/seen water in the frame.

If you check out the IC Owners Group page on face book guys are draining over a gallon of water out of their frames. Giant problem caused by condensation in the tubes. All the manufacturers have started drilling holes on painted and galvanized now. 

Edited by Lip_Ripper Guy
Hawg likes this

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I suppose I should consider drilling my steel frame also? 

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It seems like a good idea to me.  Buildup of condensation never crossed my mind until I saw some of the pictures.  

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17 hours ago, Lip_Ripper Guy said:

If you check out the IC Owners Group page on face book guys are draining over a gallon of water out of their frames. Giant problem caused by condensation in the tubes. All the manufacturers have started drilling holes on painted and galvanized now. 

Huh, had no idea.  Also have never noticed any signs of water in my frame, but I suppose that doesn't mean it doesn't exist.

So my immediate question then is how do folks keep road grime from going in the holes and having the salt/chemicals accelerate erosion inside the frame tubing?  Sure, the holes allow drainage, but they're also going to increase corrosives exposure exponentially, right?

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On 10/13/2016 at 9:37 AM, RiverChuckNorris said:

Huh, had no idea.  Also have never noticed any signs of water in my frame, but I suppose that doesn't mean it doesn't exist.

So my immediate question then is how do folks keep road grime from going in the holes and having the salt/chemicals accelerate erosion inside the frame tubing?  Sure, the holes allow drainage, but they're also going to increase corrosives exposure exponentially, right?

Late in the game on this one but I don't know what options you have on fixing the problem after the fact other than potentially drilling holes and putting plastic plugs in them for travel.  Drain a couple times a year and for storage?  We drilled holes in ours but did it  before we galvanized.  whole frame was dipped so the frame is galvanized inside and out.  No rust problems there.  I suppose if you had enough holes you could just try and run your paint through a paint gun in each hole and you would at least get some coverage but probably not worth it on the whole.  

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      First, take out the spark plug and thread in the adapter for the compression tester. Make sure you have the correct size adapter for your particular ATV. Slide your kill switch to the "off" position. Some ATVs won't crank over with the kill switch in the "off" position, so if yours is like this, then you will need to either unhook your ignition coil or ground the end of the spark plug wire to a good ground. You can use a jumper wire with alligator clips on each end to ground it. Next, make sure the throttle is in the wide open position. You can either hold the throttle lever with your thumb or you may be able to tape it or use a zip tie to fasten it to your handlebars to hold it in the wide open position. If you don't have the throttle in the wide open position, you will probably get too low of a reading. Also, if you are testing a newly rebuilt engine, the engine needs to have been run for, at least, 30 or 40 minutes or you will probably get too low of a reading.

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      ACTUAL TESTING

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      WET TEST

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      *Worn piston rings or worn or damaged cylinder walls
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