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nofishfisherman

Diy Archery Target

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Anyone ever make your own archery target?  Typically I do most of my shooting at a local range in a county park that is close to home but broadheads are not allowed on those targets.  Instead of spending $50+ on a target that I'm going to tear apart with broadheads I've been kicking around an idea for a DIY target that I can put together on the cheap.  I did some looking online and got an idea using interlocking foam floor tiles.  I have access to a bunch of free tiles at work so I thought I'd give it a go.  My plan is to cut the 24" tiles in half so that each tile makes a 12" x 24" tile.  I'll stack them up as high as I can, based on the tiles i currently have i think i can go 18" high without digging around the warehouse for more tiles.   Finished target will be 24" wide x 18" tall x 12" thick.

I'll put a piece of wood on the top and bottom of the stack and run 2 ratchet straps around the whole thing and tighten them down as much as possible in order to press the tiles tightly together. 

Once the middle of the target gets shot up I can open the ratchet straps and take out the bad tiles and replace them with some new ones giving the target a longer life span.  Then I just tighten the straps back down and start shooting again. 

I've also seen people use layers of carpet or cardboard but if left out in the elements those wouldn't last nearly as long. I've also seen people use the same tiles but just stack them up and shoot at the flat face of the tile versus the side.  That would probably work just as well to stop an arrow but you wouldn't be able to replace sections as it gets shot up.

I've got all of the material on hand already so my out of pocket costs will be $0.  I'll try to get a picture up when i get it done.

What else have you guys seen done or done yourself?  

Honestly more than trying to save some money I'm probably doing this more as an excuse to hang out in the garage, drink a few beers, and think about archery and bow hunting. 

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I thought about using threaded rods like that to hold it all tight but figure the ratchet strap will work ok and it will be a lot quicker and easier to open it up to replace sections as needed. 

 

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I would think Broadheads would make a mess of the card board . Field point would be fine .

i just use old 3D targets for broad heads . Spray paint a dot on the hind end 

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Home made targets for broadheads don't last all that long, your best bet is to use practice blades and shoot them into a pile of sand, also great for field tips and it will last a very long time. Also stuffing old clothes into a cheap tarp is a great field head target you can whip up for cheap.

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I read one guy use a cardboard box and fill it with bags of garden soil from menards shoot all 4 sides up and dump the soil in the garden when done . Costs $5-10 a year and the garden gets more dirt , win win 

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Thats not a bad idea.  I got my target put together the other day I just need to get some pictures of it and take a couple test shots.  Hope to have it at the range tomorrow so can hopefully do both.

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