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      Members Only Fluid Forum View   08/08/2017

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LindellProStaf

Ever eat green tomatoes?

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fried green tomatoes are a real thing.  Personally I don't like them but some people love them.

Luckily all of my plants are producing ripe tomatoes now so i don't have to wait. 

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36 minutes ago, smurfy said:

bobber, mine usually do at first too, but as time goes that stops.

LPS..................patience my man.................patience!!!!!!!!

 

I wish!!! Trimmed up the bottom foot of the plant, made sure all the dying leaves are plucked but still looking nasty on the bottom..:cry:

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2 hours ago, bobberineyes said:

I wish!!! Trimmed up the bottom foot of the plant, made sure all the dying leaves are plucked but still looking nasty on the bottom..:cry:

ive had maybe 6 maters outta the dozen I picked that way but all the rest look A-OK!!!!!! hope they get better. my cukes are starting to look pathetic! I may need to start begging for them too!!!!!!:cry:

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B

On ‎8‎/‎1‎/‎2016 at 5:33 PM, bobberineyes said:

Maybe that's what i should be doing, bottom rot is getting the best if my ripe ones..

Blossom end rot is caused by lack of vitamin C. It comes from inconsistent watering. Either to much or not enough. You can control this by mulching around the plant to keep moisture steady. The plant needs vitamin c and will rob it from the parts it doesn't need to stay alive. That's the fruit.

The tomatoes look to be ripening but they really aren't. They are turning red because the plant is under stress. So don't feel like you are losing out on ripe tomatoes.....you really aren't.

Edited by KEN W

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You got that right. Typically when I've tried to salvage them and eat the part that looks ripe, they taste like crud. May as well wait and get the real deal. It hasn't been much problem here so far, probably because it just keeps on raining.

Just when they're hitting on all cylinders, some of the hills of cukes here appear to be taking a hit from bacterial wilt. Those nasty little striped cucumber beetles keep ticking me off and we're going to get some heavy artillery out.:mad: 

Hmmm...haven't heard from LPS for a while. Hope he's OK and didn't croak from eating those green tomatoes! :D

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I'm having difficulty with the cukes also Dotch. The sweetcorn is right on though and the full sized tomatoes are starting to come in. On the left is a Gold Medal with just a bit of blossom end rot and on the right is  a German Pink. These are two of my favorites. :)

P1010430.JPG

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My cukes look like dump to. I water them religiously and they look like there dryinup??!!:cry:

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Here's one from the U specific to MN cucurbit production:

http://www.extension.umn.edu/garden/yard-garden/vegetables/diseases-of-cucurbits/

Bacterial wilt appears to be the problem in our garden. Saw it on some of the muskmelons earlier and after detecting the cucumber beetles, then spraying them, the problem disappeared. Need to keep repeating it and changing modes of action while I'm at it to keep them off balance and avoid resistance. 

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Drying out 'cukes, blossom end rot, slow-to -mature 'maters, and fornicating Beijing bugs on Early Girls....it's a pandemic!!!!  :tired:

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Still here Dotch.  Haven't eaten a green tomato yet but I am tempted.  I may bring a couple of big ones in the house and see if they ripen.  Sure hope they don't get the end rot before they get red.  Have two Jalapeno plants that are doing well.  Peppers are about 2" long now.  The green peppers are smaller.  Sure getting the urge for fresh garden veggies....

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Extension says

Blossom-end rot

Blossom-end rot is one of the most common tomato disorders seen in Minnesota. Affected fruit have a tan to black flattened spot at the blossom end of the fruit. Secondary fungi and bacteria can enter the blossom end rot area, resulting in further decay of the fruit. Blossom end rot can appear on fruit in any stage of development, but it is most common when fruit are one-third to one-half grown. The first fruit produced by the plant are often most severely affected. Fruit that develop later in the season on the same plant can be unaffected.

Blossom-end rot is caused by a calcium deficiency in the tomato plant. Although blossom end rot means that the plant does not have enough calcium with in the developing fruit, it does not mean that there is a lack of calcium in the soil. Often blossom end rot occurs as a result of several cultural or environmental factors that affect the plants ability to take up calcium. Fluctuations in soil moisture, heavy applications of nitrogen fertilizer, and injury roots can all predispose tomato plants to blossom end rot.

two tomatoes with brown dead spot at end

Blossom end rot, M. Grabowski

The amount of calcium salt available to the plant decreases rapidly in the presence of excessive salts such as potassium, magnesium, ammonium, and sodium. Extreme fluctuation in moisture can also reduce the availability of calcium salts needed by the plant. Heavy applications of nitrogen fertilizers and abundant rain cause rapid and luxuriant plant growth and predispose the fruit to blossom-end rot, especially during periods of dry, hot weather.

Blossom-end rot can be minimized by maintaining a uniform supply of moisture through regular watering and soil mulches, applying fertilizer according to the results of a soil test, and avoiding root injury by not cultivating within 1 foot of the base of the plant.

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Thanks for the info Ken w, and del. That pretty much tells me what's going on. My plants are in pails,  get plenty of water and drainage, it seems the every other week of epsom salt is what's doing it, all the different kinds of peppers are digging the feedings though. I'll have to get some sort of rot control and some mulch, since these pails dry up pretty fast. 

 

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1 hour ago, RebelSS said:

Ah god...Mr wizard's at it again.... f_facepalm.gif

Just copied from mn extension.   If you want to put vitamin C on your tomatoes instead, live it up.

 

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We did the pails on the deck and it was great for a couple of years.  Then the next couple of years we had the rot.  ???  Now we made the 3'x 7'  boxes.  So far so good.  This gardening isn't as easy at it should be. So glad I don't have a few hundred acres of tomatoes.  lol  6 plants is a challenge.

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1 hour ago, delcecchi said:

Just copied from mn extension.   If you want to put vitamin C on your tomatoes instead, live it up.

 

Hmmm...don't think that's what anyone was advocating there big shooter but whatever. 

I had the same issue boober trying to grow tomatoes in 5 gallon buckets especially in a drier year once they got huge. Was one of the years the wife kept bringing stuff home and I was dumb enough to keep planting it. I'd forget to water the 3 buckets occasionally then remember when they started to look wilted. I marveled at how nice the fruit looked, only to pick them and toss them over the fence. Did a late season herb planting of basil and cilantro in the buckets this year instead so will see how that turns out.

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I throw a bunch of culled oranges around the plants and that keeps the BER at bay!  :lol::lol::lol:

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