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Grainbelt

Country Ribs

13 posts in this topic

These turned out tasty, fall apart with a nice crust. I put my rub on these and slow cooked to 160 degree internal heat before the foil. Then added brown sugar, a pad of butter and apple cider vinegar for moisture and cooked till fall apart. Then firmed up on the grill before serving.

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Does the vinegar leave a sour taste?  Or does the heat reduce the effect?   I don't go for pickled ribs.

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Not really del, a lot of brisket mops use apple cider vinegar, it gives it a little different twist is all.I really like the concept of foiling with butter and brown sugar...good job grainbelt. 

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doesn't vinegar help break down the meat some to make it more tender too?

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Yup, it does, Mike. Works on pork and beef. I use apple cider vinegar mixed with concentrated apple juice for an overnite marinade.  

 

From the USDA:

Q:

Can you tenderize steak with vinegar?

A:

QUICK ANSWER

A steak can be tenderized using vinegar, according to the United States Department of Agriculture. The vinegar is used to enhance the flavor of the steak, and it is usually added in a marinade that is applied to the steak before cooking.

 KNOW MORE
 

FULL ANSWER

The acid in the vinegar helps to break down the meat's tissue and allows the steak to absorb more fluid. A vinegar marinade can be prepared using a mixture of vinegar, oil, spices or herbs. The vinegar also aids in the absorption of spices into the steak. A pound of steak requires half a cup of marinade and should always be marinated covered with a lid in the refrigerator.

LEARN MORE ABOUT MEAT
Sources:
 

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Now, all we need are some pics from ya, Mike!  :grin: Not a whole lot of cookin' going on lately....

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when I get a smart phone and learn how to use I will, til then I can only yap about it!  someday!

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Not to worry! I don't have one either,  I have to use a camera!

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Buy a cheap tablet.  It can be used for lake maps as well.  There was one on amazon for 34 bucks some guys on here were using for that.   Sorry, can't find the discussion. 

I looked on Amazon and it appears you can get a usable tablet for under 50 bucks. 

Wally world also has inexpensive tablets, I believe.

Edited by delcecchi

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Just something else for me to fiddle with, Del.  Plus, extra cash for things like that isn't on hand.  I try to limit my "electronic time"...that includes TV. Gives me more time to fiddle with food. I'm too old school. I do just fine with my Motorola dinosaur flip phone. Last month's air time used was 6 mns. :grin:

Speaking of ribs, Silver Lake food has racks of them for $1.99 lb.....

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And $60 gas money :P

Edited by delcecchi

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