Guests - If You want access to member only forums on HSO. You will gain access only when you Sign-in or Sign-Up on HotSpotOutdoors.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

  • Announcements

    • Rick

      Members Only Fluid Forum View   08/08/2017

      Fluid forum view allows members only to get right to the meat of this community; the topics. You can toggle between your preferred forum view just below to the left on the main forum entrance. You will see three icons. Try them out and see what you prefer.   Fluid view allows you, if you are a signed up member, to see the newest topic posts in either all forums (select none or all) or in just your favorite forums (select the ones you want to see when you come to Fishing Minnesota). It keeps and in real time with respect to Topic posts and lets YOU SELECT YOUR FAVORITE FORUMS. It can make things fun and easy. This is especially true for less experienced visitors raised on social media. If you, as a members want more specific topics, you can even select a single forum to view. Let us take a look at fluid view in action. We will then break it down and explain how it works in more detail.   The video shows the topic list and the forum filter box. As you can see, it is easy to change the topic list by changing the selected forums. This view replaces the traditional list of categories and forums.   Of course, members only can change the view to better suit your way of browsing.   You will notice a “grid” option. We have moved the grid forum theme setting into the main forum settings. This makes it an option for members only to choose. This screenshot also shows the removal of the forum breadcrumb in fluid view mode. Fluid view remembers your last forum selection so you don’t lose your place when you go back to the listing. The benefit of this feature is easy to see. It removes a potential barrier of entry for members only. It puts the spotlight on topics themselves, and not the hierarchical forum structure. You as a member will enjoy viewing many forums at once and switching between them without leaving the page. We hope that fluid view, the new functionality is an asset that you enjoy .
MidCoast

Marine Battery Question for 55lb Trolling Motor

Recommended Posts

ca @32 degrees 705

Group size 27 dc

cca @ 0 degrees is 575

Reserve Capacity:  175 RC/200 min. @ 23 amps

 

Is this deep cycle marine battery strong enough for a 12 volt 55lbs thrust  Minn Kota trolling motor?   Does 200 minutes mean it will only run for 200 minutes while drawing 23 amps?  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is some info on how to read the battery.  Kind of dry but i hope it helps.  I will add this link too.

http://www.minnkotamotors.com/Support/Battery-Selection---Rigging/

4. CCA, CA, AH and RC. What are these all about? These are the standards that most battery companies use to rate the output and capacity of a battery.

Cold cranking amps (CCA) is a measurement of the number of amps a battery can deliver at 0 ° F for 30 seconds and not drop below 7.2 volts. So a high CCA battery rating is especially important in starting battery applications, and in cold weather.This measurement is not particularly important in Deep cycle batteries, though it is the most commonly 'known' battery measurement.

CA is cranking amps measured at 32 degrees F. This rating is also called marine cranking amps (MCA). Hot cranking amps (HCA) is seldom used any longer but is measured at 80 ° F.

Reserve Capacity (RC) is a very important rating. This is the number of minutes a fully charged battery at 80 ° F will discharge 25 amps until the battery drops below 10.5 volts.

An amp hour (AH) is a rating usually found on deep cycle batteries. The standard rating is an Amp rating taken for 20 Hours. What this means, say for a 100 AH rated battery is this: Draw from the battery for 20 hours and it will provide a total of 100 amp-hours. That translates to about 5 amps an hour. 5 x 20 = 100. However, it's very important to know that the total time of discharge and load applied is not a linear relationship. As your load increases, your realized capacity decreases. This means if you discharged that same 100 AH battery by a 100 amp load, it will not give you one hour of runtime. On the contrary, the perceived capacity of the battery will be that of 64 Amp Hours.

5.Battery Maintenance is an important issue. The battery should be cleaned using a baking soda and water solution; a couple of table spoons to a pint of water. Cable connections need to be cleaned and tightened as battery problems are often caused by dirty and loose connections. A serviceable battery needs to have the fluid level checked. Use only mineral free water, Distilled is best as all impurities have been removed, and there is nothing left that could contaminate your cells. Don't overfill battery cells especially in warmer weather because the natural fluid expansion in hot weather can push excess electrolytes from the battery. To prevent corrosion of cables on top post batteries use a small bead of silicone sealer at the base of the post and place a felt battery washer over it. Coat the washer with high temperature grease or petroleum jelly (Vaseline), then place cable on the post and tighten. Coat the exposed cable end with the grease. Most folks don't know that just the gases from the battery condensing on metal parts cause most corrosion.

6.Digital Multi-MeterBattery Testing can be done in more than one way. The most accurate method is measurement of specific gravity and battery voltage. To measure specific gravity buy a temperature compensating hydrometer, to measure voltage use a digital D.C. Voltmeter. A quality load tester may be a good purchase if you need to test sealed batteries.

For any of these methods, you must first fully charge the battery and then remove the surface charge. If the battery has been sitting at least several hours (I prefer at least 12 hours) you may begin testing. To remove surface charge the battery must be discharged for several minutes. Using a headlight (high beam) will do the trick. After turning off the light you are ready to test the battery.
 

State of Charge Specific Gravity Voltage
    12V 6V
100% 1.265 12.7 6.3
75% 1.225 12.4 6.2
50% 1.190 12.2 6.1
25% 1.155 12.0 6.0
Discharged 1.120 11.9 6.0


Load testing is yet another way of testing a battery. Load test removes amps from a battery much like starting an engine would. A load tester can be purchased at most auto parts stores. Some battery companies label their battery with the amp load for testing. This number is usually 1/2 of the CCA rating. For instance, a 500CCA battery would load test at 250 amps for 15 seconds. A load test can only be performed if the battery is near or at full charge.

The results of your testing should be as follows:

Hydrometer readings should not vary more than .05 differences between cells.

Digital Voltmeters should read as the voltage is shown in this document. The sealed AGM and Gel-Cell battery voltage (full charged) will be slightly higher in the 12.8 to 12.9 ranges. If you have voltage readings in the 10.5 volts range on a charged battery, that typically indicates a shorted cell.

If you have a maintenance free wet cell, the only ways to test are voltmeter and load test. Any of the maintenance free type batteries that have a built in hydrometer(black/green window) will tell you the condition of 1 cell of 6. You may get a good reading from 1 cell but have a problem with other cells in the battery.

When in doubt about battery testing, call the battery manufacturer. Many batteries sold today have a toll free number to call for help.

7. Selecting a Battery - When buying a new battery I suggest you purchase a battery with the greatest reserve capacity or amp hour rating possible. Of course the physical size, cable hook up, and terminal type must be a consideration. You may want to consider a Gel Cell or an Absorbed Glass Mat (AGM) rather than a Wet Cell if the application is in a harsher environment or the battery is not going to receive regular maintenance and charging. 

Be sure to purchase the correct type of battery for the job it must do. Remember that engine starting batteries and deep cycle batteries are different. Freshness of a new battery is very important. The longer a battery sits and is not re-charged the more damaging sulfation build up there may be on the plates. Most batteries have a date of manufacture code on them. The month is indicated by a letter 'A' being January and a number '4' being 2004. C4 would tell us the battery was manufactured in March 2004. Remember the fresher the better. The letter "i" is not used because it can be confused with #1.

- See more at: https://www.batterystuff.com/kb/articles/battery-articles/battery-basics.html#sthash.thPjDWOH.dpuf

Edited by jmd1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First, what size boat/engine do you have? Aluminum or glass? How many people will be aboard?  What type of waters do you fish, choppy water, as on a river, lakes, etc. Will you be running against a current? These are all things you need to take into consideration before you decide on a battery. Far better to have a bigger battery than you need than too small......it'll last longer, too. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, MidCoast said:

ca @32 degrees 705

Group size 27 dc

cca @ 0 degrees is 575

Reserve Capacity:  175 RC/200 min. @ 23 amps

 

Is this deep cycle marine battery strong enough for a 12 volt 55lbs thrust  Minn Kota trolling motor?   Does 200 minutes mean it will only run for 200 minutes while drawing 23 amps?  

Technically, they are all "strong enough." The real question is about capacity. A smaller battery will typically have a lower overall capacity so it will not deliver the necessary current for as long as a larger battery. As Rebel already mentioned, the "necessary current" is dramatically affected by how you use it. The faster you run the motor the higher the demand on the battery. Ergo, higher speed settings, heavier boat, strong winds, water current, all add to demand on the motor and therefore the battery.

A 105 AH battery isn't too bad. I think that's what I use for my 12v 55# Powerdrive and it will run for hours on a battery charge running my Sylvan Adventurer 1600. My brother-in-law had the motor before me and he used it for years on his Lund Mr. Pike 17.5. We can run all day (not continuous of course) on a single battery. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

115 AH were very common but the 105 AH are now. That is fine for any boat.

I can troll easily for a day with one105 but I'm not going over 30% and can stretch that out over two days.  If you need more reserve you get another battery and hook them up in parallel. + to + and - to -  This is 12v with twice the reserve.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hooking up in parallel can be nice but if it's not too much work, using one at a time can be an advantage in another way. With batteries connected in parallel there is a risk. If for some reason one of the batteries develops an internal short, it can damage both batteries or if one battery begins to lose its ability to hold a charge it can draw down the other one along with it. 

Just food for thought.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have ours wired like ST & with our on board charger,which charges off the outboards alternator,they are fully charged by the time we get back to the dock 85-90% of the time.It's a 55# PD & size 27 battery set up

Edited by gunner55

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/4/2016 at 7:29 AM, gunner55 said:

We have ours wired like ST & with our on board charger,which charges off the outboards alternator,they are fully charged by the time we get back to the dock 85-90% of the time.It's a 55# PD & size 27 battery set up

Hard to believe your outboard can recharge your trolling motors that fast unless you're driving a loooong way. The starting battery may not take much time but....  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Modern motors really put out the amps.  For example the alternator on the new merc 150 fourstroke is 60 amps.  So putting 20 or 30 amp hours into a battery in a decent run on a good sized lake seems reasonable.   That would be 40 amps for half an hour....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, older motors had way feeble charging systems.  I think my 98 115 merc might have been 20 amps.  or less.

edit:  I looked it up.   16 magnificant amps.   Comes off a coil in the stator on top of the motor.  No separate alternator. 

Edited by delcecchi

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most of the new 4 strokes have high output alternators(45 amp+) like del said.Ours is a 02 Yammie 115 & it's a 2 mile run out to the south end of the main lake,where we usually fish, probably 3.5-4 to the north end

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now




  • Posts

    • Smurfy's just stirrin' the pot, those union guys must have lotsa free time.......    Say Delmar, yer Cub foods has corn for TEN CENTS AN EAR in their ad this week....
    • I buy from his buddy's truck.   What more does he want?   Sometimes I buy at walmart instead.  Life goes on, Brah  obla dee obla dah
    • WTF are you talking about?  You are already judging me so bring it on.  Tell me about your training.  Cite studies that show the deficiencies of treadmills.   Cite studies that show how Chiropractic cures diabetes and cancer...   Come on, you want to engage in a battle of wits?  Don't come half equipped.   Heat? How about I repost the bizarre chiropractic stuff?  Or have you disavowed it of late?    
    • I read about someone else fishing them like that, so gave it a try.  I use a smaller paddle tail sometimes or this last weekend I was using a SK Rodent. I've kinda switched to Dbombs and Pit bosses for t-rigs, so I figured I would use up some of those Rodents. They worked good on the Chatterbait for action, but tore up kinda fast.   This technique works best I think in dirtier water for me. I would definately have a t-rig ready too. Been catching a lot on them too!
    • You sure are into this huggin' and kissy stuff. Are you one of those touchy-feely "Oh I'm so happy" free spirit type guys?!        
    • Well, I didn't have any results anywhere close to that... we had a good time at the cabin we stayed at (got home Saturday), but fishing was very tough... if we end up going up there again next year I'll be in touch...
    • Do I need to answer to you? Absolutely not, especially when you are going to try to put together some physics logic behind why treadmills are good, completely neglecting to describe how muscles function with a protagonist and antagonist relationship.  Meaning when your quads are suppose to relax and your hamstrings are suppose to engage and vice versa.  When that doesn't happen over and over again due to the belt doing the hamstrings work, then you are developing an inefficient movement pattern (compensation) and you can expect pain, arthritis, injury, replacement, etc. (Familiar, I know the arthritis bit is) You are training yourself not to work like you were created to work.  Although for you Del, I completely understand if you think you are smarter then how we as a species got to be who we are today.  Or at least you can find something to copy and paste from somebody else whom feels the way you do, who also got dooped into buying a treadmill or pays a monthly fee to walk on a treadmill.  If you want to start judging me, I can judge you Del and this can be very fun for me but then all the snowflakes on here would melt because I brought some heat.  Your old timer buddies would come and save you, delete half my postings that expose you know absolutely nothing about this topic, you all can cry about how I am so mean and hate filled, and then not troll me for a few months until you are updated with one of my postings and then crawl right back into an argument where I make you look stupid all over.  Up to you buddy.   Dave, I got 32 seconds into that video, couldnt stand the guy and stopped it.
    • I'm no expert on this stuff but I'm guessing this is what Dr. Juice is alluding to in his own condescending way.....    
    • I am still waiting for something exciting on the Wild front...nothing yet that is for sure...just hoping the same old guys have some gas left in the tank at the end of the year and the "young kids" have finally graduated and can bring it to another level...it's all about the playoffs...getting in is easy...actually making any sort of run is the is where the rubber meets the road. Cullen making a "family" decision vs a "hockey" decision was lucky for Chuck that is for sure and Cullen is not going to bring us to another level...but will be an OK role player and 3rd or 4th liner..probably will fill the jersey of a young guy we have unfortunately..but it is what it is.
    • Which questions?  The one about your education?   Must have been a long time ago since I don't recall it.  I do remember you being a big big huge fan of Chiropractic.   Perhaps you could refresh my memory, it shouldn't take long to post your CV   And I guess you must have missed physics class as well, since in physics calculations of forces are the same no matter the frame of reference, yet you continue to suggest there is a difference between a frame referenced to a person's center of mass, and one referenced to the earth.   I did see this article from a newspaper.... The author must have at least as much qualification as you do http://healthyliving.azcentral.com/muscles-worked-out-using-treadmill-7727.html What Muscles Are Worked Out When Using a Treadmill? The treadmill is a versatile exercise machine that lets users walk, jog and run on flat or uphill surfaces. In addition to providing an effective cardiovascular workout, treadmills also help strengthen the muscles of the legs and butt. Depending on the incline, you can work the front or the rear of your legs more intensely; however, every treadmill workout strengthens both.   The Quadriceps People who walk and jog on the treadmill with regularity gain endurance and strength in the quadriceps muscles. The quadriceps are named for the four large muscles on the front of the thighs; they are the rectus femoris, vastus lateralis, vastus medialis and vastus intermedius. These muscles help the body jump and squat in addition to walking and running. As a result, treadmill exercise applies to more than just working out; it also improves the ease with which you go about activities of daily living. The Hamstrings Like the quadriceps, "hamstrings" is also a collective name for a muscle group. The hamstrings, comprising the biceps femoris, the semitendinosus and the semimembranosus, lie between the buttocks and the back of the knee on the rear thigh. The muscles of the hamstrings are used for power walking and running in addition to squatting and jumping, and -- in general -- the more you exercise on the treadmill, the greater your hamstrings' endurance gains will become. However, according to the University of Wisconsin, roughly a quarter of collegiate athletes who sprint injure their hamstrings. As a result, warm up on the treadmill slowly, and increase running speeds gradually. The Calves The calf muscles of the rear lower leg, comprising the gastrocnemius and the soleus, also work hard during treadmill exercise. According to a study from the Laboratory of Medical Physics in The Netherlands, most of the work performed by the calf muscles occurs as you push off from your toes while walking, running and jumping. You can increase the workload on your calves -- and your hamstrings -- by increasing the incline on the treadmill. The Glutes The glutes make up the muscles of the rear end and, like the leg muscles, help you walk, jump and run. "Fitness" magazine reports that people who set their treadmills to a steep incline increase the workload on their glutes significantly, which increases strength, improves endurance and burns fat and calories. Although the treadmill helps you gain leg strength, the machine is primarily known for its cardiovascular health benefits. As a result, if you exercise regularly on a treadmill you can expect health gains on the inside of your body as well as the outside.    
  • Our Sponsors