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Herky2002

Mixed bag today

11 posts in this topic

Went out in the north metro today for a couple of hours and came up with a couple dozen morels (mostly small grays), a pheasant back and a handful of ramps. I've never tried ramps before; any cooking suggestions guys?

 

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leech~~ likes this

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I made a leek and morel pizza the other day. It was great! Even with just a cheap jiffy crust

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Edited by lookincalifornia
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Herky2002 and leech~~ like this

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That pizza looks awesome!  We ate all the morels so I'll have to get out and find some more for pizza.

I just sautéed the ramps in some butter and olive oil, with a bit of garlic. They were great.  Herky Jr. won't touch spinach or onions, but he just loved the ramps, leaves, bulbs and all.  Go figure!

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Pheasant back?  Pretty solid, grows on logs?  I saw a couple of those the other day. 

So they are good to eat? 

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Del,

 

As long as they are young and tender I've been told they are quite good.  Never found them myself, as in the Brainerd area Elms don't seem to exist...

leech~~ likes this

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9 hours ago, delcecchi said:

Pheasant back?  Pretty solid, grows on logs?  I saw a couple of those the other day. 

So they are good to eat? 

Yes, but You gotta get them very young and only eat the edges.  The one in the picture was too old and had the consistency of an old tire. I found a much younger one yesterday and it was quite good. Not morel good, mind you, but pretty tasty. 

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Thanks.  The ones I saw were pretty big and seemed sort of hard when I poked them.

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I'm finding a ton of Pheasant backs, but have never picked or tried one.

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We are really enjoying the Dryad Saddle this year. It's the first time I've picked them. Thanks to @minky for the tip on the ID and how to pick them. 

We are washing them with the kitchen sprayer in cold water. Then trimming the stem out and slicing them thin. Like so...

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Then pan frying in a couple tablespoons of melted butter until golden brown....

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finish with a sprinkle of kosher salt and serve like French fries. They are delicious. My non mushroom eating 12yo daughter is cleaning them out every time. I am lucky to even get a few pieces. 

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Those look great Matt. Maybe I need to start passing all them up?

Someone give me a ruler check by the good size to pick? I keep hearing the big ones and not good?  Big one??? 

Edited by leech~~

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I would say if its bigger than your hand across the top it's too big. Others will say a pack of cards, but you can get away with a little larger than that. 

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