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Big Dave2

Over Some Food Stamps Lady Goes Off On a Family At a Wal mart

386 posts in this topic

 

1. I'm not quite sure how she would have even known he was paying with an EBT card?

2. Not that I agree with what she did but I can't believe that basically every Youtube comment is supporting the guy on food stamps.:crazy:

I especially like this comment:

Quote

A lot of people are on food stamps. Its hard to get a job let alone maintain a job. And normally the jobs that are out there do not give al ot of money to support a family. So people LIKE ME need food stamps in order to LIVE. So ya that woman is a grade A dam. She either a pretty well off person who does not get that most Americans live off food stamps or is a super republican.

 

LindellProStaf likes this

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What a big B! Not the place to be correcting the worlds problems.

GeluNumber1 likes this

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"Most Americans use food stamps"  the quote said.  Obviously the quoter is also into that lifestyle.  They are there for the people who need it.  Unfortunately too many people that use them are just plain lazy and ruin it for those who really need it.  My wife and I were going to volunteer at the local food shelf.  Then we heard who some of the people that were always waiting for the door to open and we decided it might be better if I did not go there.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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It's the lazy, shiftless ones on them that louse it up and give those impressions. Not the folks who worked most of their life, get totally disabled by injury or accident, and need them to help pay for food and all the meds they now need.

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1 hour ago, RebelSS said:

It's the lazy, shiftless ones on them that louse it up and give those impressions. Not the folks who worked most of their life, get totally disabled by injury or accident, and need them to help pay for food and all the meds they now need.

You mean the obese folks in front of me every time I'm in Walmart with two carts of food filled with pizzas and Doritos paying with their EBT card, as I'm picking up my beard and lunch meat for work.

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2 hours ago, LindellProStaf said:

"Most Americans use food stamps"  the quote said.  Obviously the quoter is also into that lifestyle.  They are there for the people who need it.  Unfortunately too many people that use them are just plain lazy and ruin it for those who really need it.  My wife and I were going to volunteer at the local food shelf.  Then we heard who some of the people that were always waiting for the door to open and we decided it might be better if I did not go there.  

 

 

 

 

Lindell Pro staff , I know what you are saying! I volunteered at my food pantry and seen some heavy duty stuff. Like i remember a time i was taking a cart out for this guy maybe in his middle to late 20"s and supposedly 7 or 8 kids!!! Yea that is taking advantage of the system. ( not all people are like that but these are the ones that make it hard for the rest),, Anyways I bring them out to a brand new Denali with not even new plates yet. I ask him how he could afford it and he said thats why he is at the food pantry. He has no money left to eat!  hhhhmmmmm???

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RebelSS, leech~~ and LindellProStaf like this

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Anyone who doesn't think there are more people taking advantage of food stamps than there are those who need it should either volunteer for a while at the local food shelf or work at a grocery store for 1 year.

leech~~, LindellProStaf and RebelSS like this

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57 minutes ago, leech~~ said:

You mean the obese folks in front of me every time I'm in Walmart with two carts of food filled with pizzas and Doritos paying with their EBT card, as I'm picking up my beard and lunch meat for work.

Yup. You forget the giant family bags of cheesy poofs in their carts. :grin:

 

leech~~ and LindellProStaf like this

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And baby formula... Buy it with the ebt and sell it for cash.  Then you got some walking around money to pick up some booze and hit the clubs!

LindellProStaf likes this

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I admit, I had to look up EBT to see what it was....:crazy:  I remember back in the 70's when we had the gas crisis and jobs started to tank, I was laid off from mine. Worked odd jobs and did all sorts of things for money, cut wood and timber, did tune-ups on engines, nighttime bartending, whatever it took. Finally caught up to me and I ran out of money. I actually went thru a period where I had basically nothing to eat. My unemployment ran out, and then I was tanked. Sold my guns ($#!@%) for cash for food. Had my dog to feed, too. I was too proud to get relief or whatever it was then, or apply for assistance. With help from friends bringing me over bags of food, I got through it. They're still all my friends today. I swore I would never, ever, go through that again. Have this thing about the cupboards and 'fridge must at least look FULL all the time. It left some deep marks. Now folks just apply for bennies without even trying. Makes me barf.

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Does working at a grocery store give you insight into the financial situation of each individual who uses food stamps or would you be judging solely on what the person looks like and what food they buy?

I've spent time working for a non-profit that dealt with hunger relief and one of the first things you learn is that there is no "norm" for what a typical food stamp recipient looks like. 

Absolutely there are people that take advantage of the system and there are also a great number of people who truly need it and use it as its intended.  Perception might be that the majority of people on food stamps are scamming the system but that doesn't make it reality.  It sounds like most of you make instant judgments about people on food stamps but I wonder if any of you have taken the time to sit down and talk with any of them to really get a full grasp of their story and to get a better sense of where they are at in their lives and what they are dealing with. 

I do think the food stamp system and really the welfare system as a whole needs to be revamped because its failing a lot of people and it leads to people being trapped in the system which in turn gives the impression that they are choosing to live off the system.  For instance someone way make $500 per month and qualify for another $500/month in various welfare benefits  (food, housing, child care, etc) so they have $1000/month to live on (these aren't real numbers just an example).  If they work really hard and earn a promotion that bumps their pay up to $750/month its likely that they are now ineligible for a large portion of the previous benefits and maybe now they are only getting an extra $100/month in assistance.  That brings their monthly total down to $850/month.  So by working really hard and trying to improve their life they get penalized and now have to get by with even less.  That not only takes away the motivation to work hard it actually penalizes you for doing so. It can get to the point where people actually can't afford to make more money because its a net loss for them.  

The entire system needs to be overhauled and made into a more efficient and streamlined process where all potential benefits are organized and controlled in one place.  It also needs to do a better job at reducing benefits gradually as a recipient is able to increase their own income.  Back to my original example if the person can go bump up their income to $750/month it would make more sense to reduce their total benefits from $500 down to $350.  It saves the taxpayers $150/month but it also shows that working harder can get a person ahead because now they are bringing in $1100/month.  If the benefits get cut to the point the person is making less than $1000 after their promotion then there is no incentive to work harder because you'll actually make less money by doing so which essentially guarantees the taxpayers will be paying the full $500 forever.   The same principle holds for someone who isn't working at all.  They may be able to claim $1500 in monthly benefits but a job may only pay $500/month.  Taking that job now reduces their benefits down to $500/month giving them $1000/month, so by taking the job they lost $500/month.  It would be a bad business decision to take the job and lose $500/month, can you blame them for turning it down?

In the end its just not as simple as some of you make it out to be.

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I occasionally spend time serving meals at the Salvation Army....have for years, and there are a lot of folks just like YOU AND ME that need help. I always sit down and have a meal with them, I enjoy talking with folks. It's never mattered to me where they came from or their status. It's amazing to hear how some of them got where they were. (Been there, done that)

LindellProStaf and gunner55 like this

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7 minutes ago, nofishfisherman said:

Does working at a grocery store give you insight into the financial situation of each individual who uses food stamps or would you be judging solely on what the person looks like and what food they buy?

 

I absolutely believe it does. Especially when that grocery store is in a small town where you know everyone anyway. When you see these people around town all the time and witness the lifestyle they lead you tend to come away with a different perspective. 

I worked in grocery stores for 15 years of my life from high school up to my late 20's. Even then with as young and dumb as I was I knew something wasn't right. People I knew very well who worked less than me, partied more than me and drove nicer cars than me were getting assistance. 

Your comment about what food they buy also speaks a lot about the person buying it. Most of the food stamp customers would buy the easiest and most expensive meals they could get away with. On the other hand, we had farm wives who came in and bought staples like flour, sugar, etc and you knew that meant that they were taking the time to prepare homemade less expensive meals for their family. WIC vouchers used to allow the users to get one bag of dried beans. Do you think any of these "needy" people would even bother to take the beans? No, hardly any of them took the beans but at my house as a kid my mom made a pot of bean or split pea soup all the time. It was a cheap meal and to those people it would have been a free meal but they didn't bother to take them home.

Back in the paper food stamp days, people used to go through the line several times with a piece of penny bubble gum so they could pay for it with a $1 food stamp and get the change back in real money. When they had enough change accumulated they would buy a pack of cigarettes. There were also the ones who came in and got $20 worth of groceries with food stamps but then whip out a $20 bill to buy a carton of smokes. Then you might see them heading to the liquor store to get another $20 case of beer.

I went back to work at the store part time as a night manager a few nights a week about 6 or 7 years ago after a long time out of the business. Not much had changed except EBT cards replaced food stamps and the types of food allowable had become more lenient. Now you get Peanut butter with your WIC coupon and all kinds of prepared deli foods were allowed for purchase. I even saw one woman buying sushi! One guy came in and bought an entire plastic grocery bag full of candy. 

Very few people I came in contact with who were getting assistance actually struck me as being any more in need than the next guy. 

 

33 minutes ago, nofishfisherman said:

 

I do think the food stamp system and really the welfare system as a whole needs to be revamped

This I can agree with.

35 minutes ago, nofishfisherman said:

 It would be a bad business decision to take the job and lose $500/month, can you blame them for turning it down?

Yes I can. Why not have some pride? Why not look toward the future and attempt to better yourself? That $500 loss/month could eventually turn into a +$2000 per month if the person decides to do the right thing, take the job, work hard and move up the ladder. Why be so short-sighted?

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24 minutes ago, Big Dave2 said:

 

Yes I can. Why not have some pride? Why not look toward the future and attempt to better yourself? That $500 loss/month could eventually turn into a +$2000 per month if the person decides to do the right thing, take the job, work hard and move up the ladder. Why be so short-sighted?

Not everyone can afford to look 10-15 years down the road.  Pride can also be a luxury at times.  If I'm sitting at home with young kids to feed do I let them starve because I've got too much pride?  Do I let them starve for 10 years because of some long term plan of not letting them starve in the future?  Sometimes you have to make decisions based on how to survive today and then worry about the future later.  Of course in an ideal world you take the job and hope to make it work but you and I both know we don't live in an ideal world and sometimes you don't have the luxury of pride or the luxury of time to wait until things get better.

I'm not going to say there is no abuse.  Some of what you described above certainly does happen but I'm also confident in saying that some of those people who you judged probably had more going on in their lives than is readily apparent to a part time night manager.

Unfortunately it seems that a real solution to the problem isn't on any ones agenda.  Some talk about cutting all programs, some talk about adding all sorts of restrictions or mandates, and some say increase funding.  None of them get at the heart of the real problem.  There is enough money in the system, there are already plenty of restrictions, but the process is so broken and mismanaged that no one can really see the big picture of how all the different benefit programs actually work or don't work for an average person.

 

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Potatoes, bannanas, white bread, pork, beans, rice... These all can go a looong way on a little bit of money.  I agree plenty of people need the benefits.  I do not agree that the system allows them to eat steak and candy bars on the tax payers dime.  Everyone should be able to eat, and your right, there is plenty of money in the system(probably to much) it's just being wasted on expensive foods that aren't even healthy.  The thing is even if the majority are spending on cheap but hearty staples, just having a few blow through $200 of garbage and more luxury foods when $50.00 would suffice, puts a huge strain on the system. 

Edited by Moon Lake Refuge
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The money that a person or family gets in food benefits should be determined by their income and the amount of people that they are feeding (a single person gets less than someone feeding a family of 4).  Once the person gets that money its really up to them as to how to feed their family.  If they blow through the money on expensive prepackaged food or a couple t-bones then the money doesn't go as far.  That is where its up to the individual to be smart about how to make the money last.   

There is also a large disconnect for many people when it comes to fresh foods.  When I was working for the non-profit hunger group we got access to a semi load of fresh potatoes.  We couldn't give the dang things away for free because so many people didn't know what to do with them.  Its not that they didn't want the food its just that way too many people didn't know how to cook them.  To you and I it seems hard to believe that someone wouldn't know how to bake a potato but its true.  I had to create an entire marketing campaign essentially to teach people what to do with a frickin' potato.  That lack of education plays into their food choices and leads to a reliance on prepackaged food.  Also if you put 100 packages of $2 wonder bread on the shelf next to 100 loaves of $5 fresh baked artisan bread all of the wonder bread will be gone before the first loaf of "good" bread gets touch.  Again a lack of food education.  It leads to a lot of wasted money and its also a major factor in the countries obesity problem.  Just another case of this being a more complicated issue than most realize. 

GeluNumber1 likes this

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Just remember, as I used to tell my kids, that half the people are of below average intelligence.

(and for the nitpickers, yes it should be median not average but for a normal distribution it is pretty close)  

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3 minutes ago, nofishfisherman said:

The money that a person or family gets in food benefits should be determined by their income and the amount of people that they are feeding (a single person gets less than someone feeding a family of 4).  Once the person gets that money its really up to them as to how to feed their family.  If they blow through the money on expensive prepackaged food or a couple t-bones then the money doesn't go as far.  That is where its up to the individual to be smart about how to make the money last.   

There is also a large disconnect for many people when it comes to fresh foods.  When I was working for the non-profit hunger group we got access to a semi load of fresh potatoes.  We couldn't give the dang things away for free because so many people didn't know what to do with them.  Its not that they didn't want the food its just that way too many people didn't know how to cook them.  To you and I it seems hard to believe that someone wouldn't know how to bake a potato but its true.  I had to create an entire marketing campaign essentially to teach people what to do with a frickin' potato.  That lack of education plays into their food choices and leads to a reliance on prepackaged food.  Also if you put 100 packages of $2 wonder bread on the shelf next to 100 loaves of $5 fresh baked artisan bread all of the wonder bread will be gone before the first loaf of "good" bread gets touch.  Again a lack of food education.  It leads to a lot of wasted money and its also a major factor in the countries obesity problem.  Just another case of this being a more complicated issue than most realize. 

And making easy for those same folks to have more and more kids only teaches the kids the same thing. 

There are plenty of people out there that know way more about how to play the system than how to cook a healthy meal.  And sad fact is they teach there kids that.  Look around you and see how may families there are where kids have not seen their parents have a steady and in some cases ever leave for work while growing up.  What are they being taught?

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2 minutes ago, nofishfisherman said:

The money that a person or family gets in food benefits should be determined by their income and the amount of people that they are feeding (a single person gets less than someone feeding a family of 4).  Once the person gets that money its really up to them as to how to feed their family.  If they blow through the money on expensive prepackaged food or a couple t-bones then the money doesn't go as far.  That is where its up to the individual to be smart about how to make the money last.   

There is also a large disconnect for many people when it comes to fresh foods.  When I was working for the non-profit hunger group we got access to a semi load of fresh potatoes.  We couldn't give the dang things away for free because so many people didn't know what to do with them.  Its not that they didn't want the food its just that way too many people didn't know how to cook them.  To you and I it seems hard to believe that someone wouldn't know how to bake a potato but its true.  I had to create an entire marketing campaign essentially to teach people what to do with a frickin' potato.  That lack of education plays into their food choices and leads to a reliance on prepackaged food.  Also if you put 100 packages of $2 wonder bread on the shelf next to 100 loaves of $5 fresh baked artisan bread all of the wonder bread will be gone before the first loaf of "good" bread gets touch.  Again a lack of food education.  It leads to a lot of wasted money and its also a major factor in the countries obesity problem.  Just another case of this being a more complicated issue than most realize. 

I do get where your coming from.  Even split of money then your on your own.  Respectfully I disagree.  Do whatever you want with your own paycheck.  Heck I watch the cooking forum, do I need a smoked prime rib?  No.  Do I enjoy it when I have one? Heck yes.  But once you are being fed off public money I think that money should go towards certain foods that are proven cheap and can provide ample sustenance.  When you surpass that cap where you are now eating on your own check, go nuts!  Join a forum with a bunch of folks and start talking about your tasty jerky for the week!

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I will agree that part of any sort of reform could or should include some additional limits put on what food can be purchased.  I'd for sure eliminate candy, soda, etc.  When it comes to prepackaged food I'm a little more torn and maybe you'd have to break that category up further saying some are ok and some are not.  

All in all its a broken system and isn't really helping anyone like intended.  Taxpayers are feeling ripped off, its not helping people get ahead, and its not helping people make healthy choices.  So much could be done to improve the system but the only interest seems to be in getting rid of it entirely or blindly increase funding.  In my opinion both are bad ideas.

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1 hour ago, nofishfisherman said:

I will agree that part of any sort of reform could or should include some additional limits put on what food can be purchased.  I'd for sure eliminate candy, soda, etc.  When it comes to prepackaged food I'm a little more torn and maybe you'd have to break that category up further saying some are ok and some are not.

All in all its a broken system and isn't really helping anyone like intended.  Taxpayers are feeling ripped off, its not helping people get ahead, and its not helping people make healthy choices.  So much could be done to improve the system but the only interest seems to be in getting rid of it entirely or blindly increase funding.  In my opinion both are bad ideas.

I think all the food should be on Michelle Obama's healthy school food list or Heart Healthy marked at least. Of course like the kids in school no one would eat it anyway! ;)

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4 hours ago, nofishfisherman said:

Not everyone can afford to look 10-15 years down the road.  Pride can also be a luxury at times.  If I'm sitting at home with young kids to feed do I let them starve because I've got too much pride?  Do I let them starve for 10 years because of some long term plan of not letting them starve in the future?  Sometimes you have to make decisions based on how to survive today and then worry about the future later.  Of course in an ideal world you take the job and hope to make it work but you and I both know we don't live in an ideal world and sometimes you don't have the luxury of pride or the luxury of time to wait until things get better.

 

Give me a break. How many people are actually starving? You don't think that young guy in the video I posted has a $500 smart phone in his pocket with a monthly plan? How about internet access and cable or satellite tv? 90% of the time it is not a case of starving vs. eating it's more a case of eating well and maintaining all the other creature comforts or cutting back and no one in this selfish society ever wants to cut back.

As far as "affording" to look several years down the road, how can you afford NOT to?

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15 hours ago, Big Dave2 said:

Give me a break. How many people are actually starving? You don't think that young guy in the video I posted has a $500 smart phone in his pocket with a monthly plan? How about internet access and cable or satellite tv? 90% of the time it is not a case of starving vs. eating it's more a case of eating well and maintaining all the other creature comforts or cutting back and no one in this selfish society ever wants to cut back.

As far as "affording" to look several years down the road, how can you afford NOT to?

If you saw and spoke with some of the people I met in my time at the non-profit you'd be able to answer all of those questions yourself.  I promise you'd learn more by doing that than all of your time working in a grocery store. 

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