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MN Hooksetter

Punching weights

6 posts in this topic

Hey guys, is a 3/4 oz tungsten weight enough for getting through most Minnesota vegetation (milfoil, pads, heavy slop) when it comes to punching or is a 1 oz or more weight preferred?  These weights aren't cheap so no need to overkill if I don't have to.  Thanks.

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I use to think 3/4 would do but some of the stuff I have run into the last couple of years would need a 1oz or 1.5oz. I had a lake last year where even an 1oz thrown up in the air wouldn't punch through. Had to go heavier and find small holes to get through. But fish were under there so I was happy :-)

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Like B24 says.. it really depends on the cover.  A lot depends on the plastic and hook you are using too.  If you are using a narrower worm and a flipping straight shank hook the 3/4 should be fine.  But if using a larger 4/0 or bigger offset hook and a brushhog or beaver type plastic you may want bigger at times.  Personal preference, never a bad idea to be prepared and have 1 or 2 of each weight.

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For me 3/4 will do the job most of the time. I carry a few 1 oz., but rarely find them necessary. 

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I usually use 3/4 as well, but have had to go as big as 1.5 when punching wild rice mats in the late summer/fall. It's worth carrying a few bigger ones, IMO, because if you don't have enough heft to get through the mats, you eliminate (or at least minimize) punching as a viable option.

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When you throw your weight up in the air at the highest point right before it starts back down snap your rod in a aharp downward motion.

The weight will accelerate and punch through almost anything. 

This technique will allow you to use lighter weights.

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