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Cret Jigs

Texas Riggin for Bass ....

11 posts in this topic

  Hi .... How are you all Texas rigging for Bass.   I have planted my Boat in deep water and a long cast into the shallow weed line's and let it sit for a long time and work it back slow?   Is that an ok plan?   I do have success and other times nothing.   I fish in clear water with a red Texas rig hook 1/0 with variety of 5" garlic/salted Senko's?   Looking for ways to enhance my Texas Rig Fishing?  (new to Bass fishing)

Cret

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Switch up your baits a little bit (curly tail worms, creature baits, flipping tubes, craw baits). Senkos can be great but if you are throwing them texas rigged you should be using at least a 4/0 offset hook. Are you using a bullet weight or going weightless? T-rigs can be used all over the water column. They are great around timber, docks, rocks, and shallow grass. I always have a weighted t-rig tied on. I very rarely throw a weightless t-rig just because I am not patient enough haha. In the spring I will usually have 1/4oz or 3/8oz bullet weight with a missile baits dbomb or a strike king flipping tube. Good luck man. Also check out YouTube for videos on all the types of techniques. It's a great resource. 

RuddyDuck likes this

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Hi Cret..

Texas rigging may be one of the most versatile ways to catch bass.  Great advice in the post above mine.  Your hook is a little small for the lure you are using.  Also, shape, as stated can make a difference.

As for why you catch them some days and not others.. Well, the fish move depending on seasonal patterns and weather patterns.  Some days they are on the weed edge, some days they are in the weeds. and some days they are IN the weeds.  And this all can change throughout the day as the weather changes.  Your job is to find out where the fish are and then the most effective way to catch them.  Texas rig is not a bad idea, but its not the only way.

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BF24 has some good info there.

I like ribbon tailed worms and even though it isn't flashy anymore, I assume a T-rigged 6-10inch ribbon tailed worm has caught more than it's fair share of bass for us bass guys! I like the Culprit and Yum versions. Alot of people like the Berkley power worms also. They seems to tear quicker for me though.

I also think a good rule of thumb( which I picked up form reading on here!) is to use a more compact bait like a beaver or d-bomb for heavier weeds/cover and maybe the worms in thinner weeds/cover. I also like the beavers for holes as it seems to drop down a little straighter, where a worm arcs out a little more. Just to warn you, you may now end up with 20lbs of plastics in your tackle bag!

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ONLY 20lbs Ruddy?  You amateur you!!!  Kidding.......but sadly I have WAY to many plastics.  I have a bin that is probably 60lbs of my "spares"

rascal23 likes this

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Funny, I meant for Cret! I know I have more than 20lbs. That did get me thinking as I typed it, about how much I have. I'm gonna weigh my bag tonight! I'm guessing between 30-40lbs. 

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Don't do it!!!!!  There are some things best left to never know.  This way you "probably" only have like 20lbs of plastics so what's a few more bags....

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I'm pretty similar bf24 above, I fish a ton of T-rigged baits, tubes, craw, and creatures from inside the weed line to out side the weed line just about any time of year, and fish curl tail worms the most in the heat of the summer, say July/August on the outside weed line. I'm sort of an edge guy, I follow,the weed line edge out from spring into summer, then follow it back in from summer to fall as it starts receding. Generally speaking I keep my boat pulled off the weedline prolly 20 yards and cast at angle into the weed line, not quite parallel, trying to work my bait back to the boat always staying from within a few yards in/out of the edge, I'm not sure if that even makes sense.  I guess what I don't do is cast straight perpendicular from the boat torwards shore, as the bait is only at any one depth or distance from a weed edge for a very narrow window. From there I mess around with profile and drop speed, and then color. 

Something I over looked for years was drop speed, based on how fish might be positioned, sun light, water clarity, time of day, natural forage, sometimes you I want the bait falling quickly for a reaction bite, other times having it fall slower and staying higher in the water column. For example, if I get bit on the initial fall right away after the bait hit the water, I usually stay lighter with my weight and bait, as fish are more than likely higher in the water column and prolly looking up.

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So the weight is in. Thought it would be more. My main plastics bag came in at 20lbs 4oz. This was pretty much all stuff for T-rigs. In the pouches of my main tackle box I had 5lbs of plastics.Mostly Trailers for swim jigs/spinnerbaits and also swim bait stuff. If I can include platics up north at the cabin, I might have another 5lbs of stuff to include. I guess now I know what it all weighs.

JP Z likes this

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Anybody who tells my wife I have more than 2 lbs of plastic baits is no longer my friend.

 

JP Z likes this

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I just tell my wife that the extra box of worms I have in storage is really holding the spare anchor, she does not bother to check what I really have in their. I really can't pass up a table with clearance plastic worms and trailers..

JP Z likes this

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