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DrJuice1980

Brule

7 posts in this topic

Spent some time there on Sunday, 1st timer.  Cool area, nice to see plenty of locations to stop and fish as well.  Stopped at a few, spoke to a couple guys, nobody was doing much if any, I blanked.  There a special way to fish this river that I dont know about?  I watched a guy throw what looked as is it was a vertical jig presentation, rod length away.  He stood there in the same pool for what was probably hours, doing the same thing.  Im more of a run and gun and put a ton of miles on, ripping 100's of casts, up and down banks, like to throw spinners.  Is that way successful here or do I need to dumb it down to holding a rod out and lightly jig or rake over rocks?  

 

 

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There are many who fish the same hole or run for hours, this works, but I move, a lot.  I drift yarn and spawn and its deadly.   Many throw spinners, they work, usually see more of that in the fall.  However, you can't fish all the water with a spinner and I'm not a treble hook fan.   Find water that's not pounded if you can.  

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Spring fishing differs a bit from fall fishing in that the fish are significantly more aggressive in the fall, readily chasing spinners and flatfish. I would speculate that drift fishing probably accounts for 99% of legally hooked fish in the spring. The principle key to success is learning the river. Once you're able to identify the types of water that will hold fish in any given condition, most of the battle is over. Then it's just a matter of executing what you've learned. Be patient. There are an awful lot of guys who might fish all season for one hook-up. After you figure things out, you'll probably be disappointed if you're not hooking an average of several fish a day.

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Thanks for the info fellas!  Sounds like switching tactics is the way to go.

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Paying attention to flows, water temperature, and clarity will tell you what tactics to use on a certain day. In water below 40 degrees, the fish won't move very far or fast to hit your presentation, so you need to get slow and deep. Drift fishing always gets you slow and deep in all flows of water. Bobber fishing can accomplish slow and deep in medium too light flows, and will do it with more stealth, plus you'll hang up less. In 40-50 degrees fish will start moving around a bit, but bobber and drift fishing will still catch more fish most days. Later in the spring when fish start dropping back they'll get aggressive again (especially in water over 50 degrees) and will chase spinners, plugs, and swung flies...keep them moving slow and deep though. This can be a really fun way to fish. Also, switch your trebles out for a siwash single. It's better for the fish and you'll actually get more solid hook-ups. A 9-11 foot spinning rod, baitcaster, or fly rod with mono can be rigged for all three techniques. Try em out for yourself and see what you like.

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Seemed like it was a little quick and murky.  Havent busted out the fly rod in years, sounds like the way to go.  Thank you!

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Dr. Juice try float fishing. While anglers are really starting to embrace the centerpin a simple float fishing set up on a spinning rod will keep you in the strike zone and allow you to avoid snagging up all the time. Attaching the float with surgical tubing will let you know where you are in the water column. If the float points downstream you are set too deep, if it points upstream you need more split shot on your line, if it stands up and you see a nice tick once every couple feet you are in the zone. Adjust depth consistently and play with the amount of split shot on your line. Beads, black bugs, spawn and yarn all work great under a float. This is a highly effective and under utilized method to hook Brule River steelhead. Good luck! 

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