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eyeguy 54

yotes

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My son has never hunted them but wants to give it a try this year. I don't think he really knows what to do with them once he shoots them as far as skinning them out or where to bring them after that? Any ideas from those that have. Or do you just trash can them? :confused:

Edited by leech~~

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at least keep the tail.  We used to have a contest when we hunted them in AZ.  Had to keep the tail to prove the kill.  It was warm there though.  If I was a kid I'd tinker with skinning one and experiment with tanning it myself.

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Rebel you are not using my Chihuhua's

Of course not!  My neighbors little black ones that go YAPYAPYAPYAPYAPYAPYAP all day long......:mad:     

Why, I even have a chihuahua....:grin:

1a116dd673ab39d16bc0dc87d0002de2.jpg

Edited by RebelSS

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My son has never hunted them but wants to give it a try this year. I don't think he really knows what to do with them once he shoots them as far as skinning them out or where to bring them after that? Any ideas from those that have. Or do you just trash can them? :confused:

He can go to either the Minnesota Forest Zone Trappers Assn, or the Minnesota Trappers Assn for information on how to take care of the fur and potential markets.  Both organizations have web pages, and are happy to help new fur harvestors get started.

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Melby fur in New London will buy them in the round. Not sure what they are going for this year though. IMO it's a waste to hunt them if you're just gonna leave them lay. On another note if you happen to get one that looks a little mangy don't even touch it. There are kits you can buy for tanning your own or you can have it sent away and get it back in a few months. You tube has a lot of videos to help also.

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Did the old shoot and let lay today while pheasant hunting. I was walking a ten foot wide berm in a picked cornfield and had one jump up five feet away and I hammered it as it ran across the corn stubble. That thing was sleeping so soundly it let the dog go right by and I was right on top of it when it woke up and took off. It had a big open sore on it's back so I let it lay. That was the fourth coyote I have shot over the years while pheasant hunting. Got a couple of roosters too.

 

 

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I'm with eyeguy and hate to say that but yes please shoot trap do whatever it takes I guess legally to put a hurting on them as they are serious fawn killers each spring until the fawn makes it to 10 weeks old, then predation drops heavy so think about mid-May to end of june also, as there's no season and I know their fur looks like a great uncles beard but please, their numbers are at all time highs in many places in MN. I know mange will eventually even the score but can't hope for that so please thin them out as much as possible, trying to get as many onboard as possible due to such a poor crop of fawns following the mild winter/spring last year, save a fawn drop some yotes,bears(in season),bobcats(in season),stray dogs like I really care about calling a CO to do that job, go ahead fine me for these dogs that have partially ruined 2 deer seasons for me, these jack owners could give a rats or they would have them under control talking dogs.

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Coyotes in Minnesota are an unprotected species.  There are no closed seasons for unprotected species and you do not need to have a license to take them.

Residents and nonresidents are not required to have a license to hunt unprotected species including coyote. (MN Hunting Regs. p24)

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Thx !  I always thought that but a guy told me different. As big as the reg book is I missed it. LOL

from the regs

WHAT ARE UNPROTECTED ANIMALS? • Unprotected birds include: house sparrows, starlings, common pigeons, Eurasian collared dove, chukar partridge, quail, other than northern bobwhite, and monk parakeets are unprotected and may be taken at any time. • Unprotected mammals include: Weasels, coyotes, gophers, porcupines, striped skunks, and all other mammals for which there are no closed seasons or other protection are unprotected animals. • Unprotected birds and mammals may be taken in any manner, except with the aid of artificial lights or by using a motor vehicle to drive, chase, run over, or kill the animal. • Poisons may be used only when the safety of humans and animals is ensured and in accordance with state and federal restrictions. Do I need a license to hunt unprotected species? No. Residents and nonresidents are not required to have a license to hunt unprotected species including coyote. Nonresidents do not need a furbearer hunting license in addition to their small game license to hunt fox. 

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I thought that also but figured you already had a small game license and most people do.  I also couldn't find it handily in the Big Book of regs.  Good to know in case my son wants to go since he isn't Mr Small Game.

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Are there any legal issues with leaving yote carcasses on public land? I know they don't want people dumping deer remains on public land so it seems like they powers that be would probably want you taking the yotes with you and dumping them in the trash or something.  Do you guys do anything different whether you are on public or private land?

I have never hunted yotes so I'm not very well informed on what people do with them and so far I haven't encountered one when I had the chance of killing it.  Seems I mostly run across them either in places I can't discharge a firearm or when I don't have a weapon with me.

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I think the last coyote I got was consumed by coyotes lol. Sure seems like each rifle season they vanish pretty well and I don't hear them like I do on every calm night, maybe the next full moon period they'll get yappin. I think they busted out of our sections as no 1 shot a deer in either section this year so no gutpiles, no yotes it seems, but don't doubt the crafty yote is still meandering around but they've been silent since rifle opened and not visible not that they are too often and nofish's last sentence says it all.

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For guys that have hunted them what calling do you start with when you first set up? And is a rabbit call better then a fawn call?

I think my son and I are going to try and clean a few out of our Deer hunting area this winter. There's a lot of Wolves in the area as well. Hope we don't make any mistakes in ID? :whistle:

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I'm with eyeguy and hate to say that but yes please shoot trap do whatever it takes I guess legally to put a hurting on them as they are serious fawn killers each spring until the fawn makes it to 10 weeks old, then predation drops heavy so think about mid-May to end of june also, as there's no season and I know their fur looks like a great uncles beard but please, their numbers are at all time highs in many places in MN. I know mange will eventually even the score but can't hope for that so please thin them out as much as possible, trying to get as many onboard as possible due to such a poor crop of fawns following the mild winter/spring last year, save a fawn drop some yotes,bears(in season),bobcats(in season),stray dogs like I really care about calling a CO to do that job, go ahead fine me for these dogs that have partially ruined 2 deer seasons for me, these jack owners could give a rats or they would have them under control talking dogs.

https://youtu.be/5KhlZZ0KZL8

You mean like these! :(

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@leech~~

There is a time and place for fawn in distress, this time of year I don't have much success using it. It is a great sound in the summer or early fall, but winter not so much.

If you are in an area that gets a lot of calling pressure the electronic calls might not get any response. Most guys hit the e-caller and let it ride with rabbit in distress. Because it works. But try a bird sound like wood pecker or partridge or pheasant distress and you might do better.

I prefer hand calls as nobody blows a distress call the same as anyone else. I could give you my calls and have you blow a sequence and it will sound way different than my sequence. But they take time to learn.

Keep the wind in your face and set up where they will have a hard time working in behind you. Then kill what you call, because an educated dog is very hard to call in a second or third time.

 

good luck!!!

 

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