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Mid-Lake Rock

Minnesota Midgets

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I discovered this melon while reading this page.  I have a question to anyone who plants them: Can I successfully grow two plants in one five gallon bucket?  I have some in the garden, but want some extras.  Thanks in advance.  

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I have been planting these in my garden the last 2 years. I have 10 mounds in a pretty small area but it works if you help position the vines for spacing. They are the best! Mine started flowering a few days ago. I have never tried to grow in a pot but would think you would have to water at least twice a day like my tomatoes in the buckets. I do have a broccoli plant in a pot on the deck and it is way behind the ones in the garden and I don't think I will get a very big head on it. Let us know how it turns out.

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I planted the Midgets for the first time this year. I'm hoping the little rascals live up to their reputation. Mine are still quite small, which shouldn't be surprising I guess. 

 

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I had some seeds left from last year and they didn't grow so I had to order more so they got planted a little late. They should get about the size of a grapefruit or maybe a little bigger. They are ripe when you pick them up and they break off the vine by themselves. Cant wait, getting tired of the store bought when you have to hope they are good and tender...lol.

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Have grown them with OK success in 10 gallon nursery pots.  5 gallons would probably work, but as mentioned, would really need keep up on the watering and have a potting mix that would hold some moisture. Think Swamptigers "setup" in Raised Garden thread would be perfect for this.......

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Update.  I have two plants in one five gallon buck and two in the garden.  The ones in the bucket are growing extremely fast and are much larger than the garden plants.  They have about the same amount of sunlight, but I think the soil in the bucket is better.  I water them in the morning before work and in the afternoon when I get home.  It will be interesting to see the end result.  

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It don't look too close to being ripe to me. Aside from looking ripe, the rule of thumb with muskmelons is that when you push slightly on the stem it pops right off. Dotch grows a lot of melons he should have some good advice. 

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Agree on probably not ripe and that the stem is key, but yes, the midgets will most often net/brown up; and usually grow a little bigger. 

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I have a couple that just started to turn color this weekend. They should turn tan like the ones in the store. Roony is right on, I will pick them up and if they fall off the vine they are ripe. I am disappointed with my crop. They were looking great with a lot of flowers and then some plants started turning brown and died off. I wonder if it was too many plants too close. I have enough still going to have some to eat but not what I was hoping for.

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No I didn't check for borers. I will have to check and see if I can find any sign of them. I'm not real knowledgeable with diseases or pests. I mostly plant, water, weed and hope for the best....lol. I work hard at it though! I also never put any chemicals on except for a little miracle grow.

 

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Squash vine borers are rare in melons in my experience but not to say it can't happen. It has good fusarium tolerance so that probably isn't it. What you're describing sounds like powdery mildew. Haven't had the issue in the melons this year so far but last year 2 of the varieties I planted (Superstar and Roadside Hybrid) both got into trouble with powdery mildew and croaked before many of the melons were ripe. Athena which has good tolerance was fine. Minnesota Midget is an old variety (1948 release) and would question its powdery mildew tolerance under conditions conducive to its development. That includes cooler cloudy weather and free moisture on the canopy for extended periods of time. I see while I was gone powdery mildew made inroads into some of the other vine crops. 

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We harvested our first couple of Minnesota Midgets. I thought they were kind of bland tasting. In my limited experience it seems like muskmelons taste best if you have hot, dry weather when they are maturing. I have several left on the vines so we'll see how they turn out.

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I cut up my first melons today. I tried a couple as I cut them but I prefer them cold. They tasted pretty good though. Going to have some with the beer can chicken and sweet corn for supper. I see they are turning color fast in the garden.

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As Dotch says.....powdery mildew is a problem with the older varieties. I have planted Goddess the past few years and started eating them 2 weeks ago.They come from the same company as Athena, along with Minerva and Aphrodite.Those 3 are all good but a couple weeks later to ripen.My families favorite is a really sweet when ripe is A Santa Clause melon named Lambkin.They eat them as fast as they ripen.Picked the first ripe one today. My favorite is a Galia melon named Sensation.

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Being open pollinated, they can be pretty variable in color. Have seen them yellow like that, "normal", and darker green.  Suppose the same thing goes for taste. Some will be better than others. Like rooney mentioned, think a drier ripening season does help.

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I would cut it open. I had some that looked like that and by the time I cut them up, they were too ripe. I cut into a few that were still green and they were good. I noticed that they are not as sweet as in past years. I don't know if it is the cooler season or what but I am a little disappointed.

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First time I planted these, I'm not sure there will be a second time. I've had a couple that were worth eating but many went to the hogs.

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