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leechlake

Please explain all the different line types

6 posts in this topic

I've been using 4-10 pound stren mono for years, I'm semi confused by all the "newer" lines out there. I've seen spiderwire and it looks like braided line to me. What's out there and what would it be used for. If you used a super line for walleye fishing do you then use a leader material. Any help would be great.

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I'm no expert, but I'll start and the seasoned folks can correct me and/or add info.

Monofilament - Single homogenous strand of nylon. Knots well, stretches some but if the filament is compromised in any way it fails. There's good mono and bad mono. Good mono might be Berkeley XL or Ironsilk. Bad mono might be the 300 yards fo $1.50 stuff on the bottom shelf.

Braided - Nylon and possibly other fibers spun into a braid, like the old black stuff. Superbraids are a tighter spin and coated to protect both the line and the gear. Knots should be a non-slippable type like a uni (hangman's), palomer, or surgeon's loop. This line also has a higher strength/diameter than mono. Most are rated on the packege with 2 numbers - the tested rating (20 lb. test) and the mono diameter of that line (6lb.) Superbraids don't snap-off. Keep clippers or scissors handy, and keep snagging probability in mind when rigging. Leaders are a good idea sometimes. Good braid might be Power Pro or Tuf Line. This is my first season using it, so I don't know any bad ones yet.

Flourocarbon - Kinda like a mono in principle, but a different plastic. Less visible than mono, greater tensile strength (my opinion) but less stretch therefore more brittle. Knots can burn easily and will snap in a heartbeat if they're not quite right. Smells funny when ya burn it. Give the line a day or two to adapt to your spool, or it'll nest up on you. I've only used one kind; P-line Xtra strong and I like it, now that I know what 'knot' to do. (no smilie for "cheesy pun").

Fusion - I don't know squat about fusion lines.

Hope that helps a little. Peace and Fishes,

------------------
Aquaman
< )/////><{
"I think we're gonna need a bigger boat."

[This message has been edited by Aquaman01 (edited 04-02-2003).]

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Great explanation - just a couple more things.

Florocarbon is made from extruded florocarbon crystals.

Fireline is a fused line. Couldn't tell you what they fuse.

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I still like mono for most applications. Braids/superlines (fireline, spiderwire, powerpro) are very different from mono in a couple of ways. The most important is that they don't stretch. This really increases sensitivity. However, it also increases the resistence that the fish feels when it strikes. When I first used fireline, I had it on a stiff, sensitive, graphite rod, and I was amazed at the sensivity. It felt like I could feel every pebble my jig touched on the bottom, and I definitely could feel light bites. The problem was- when a fish would hit my bait moderately hard, often times it was off before I could even react to set the hook. Between my line and my rod, I had almost no give between me and the fish, and this either allowed the fish to feel me and drop the bait, or it simply caused the bait to be "pulled out" of the fishes mouth inadvertantly before the hookset. This also made it harder to fight the fish. Imagine one dog tied to a tree with giant rubber band (mono), and another dog tied to a tree with a thin rope (superline). when the dog runs on the rubber band, the shock is going to be spread out, but when he runs on the rope theres going to be a quick shock. something's got to give and it won't be the line. The answer is to use a short mono leader, which gives you a little bit of stretch. I suppose you could also use a limper rod. The superlines are stronger than mono too, and people say they don't break, but I have found that- at least the smaller lb tests- are easily cut by toothies and rocks. I would guess that the lack of stretch is the reason for this. There are also small differences between specific brands and models of superlines that I'm sure others can comment on, but the important things are that none of them stretch, they are all strong with small diameters, and almost all of them float.

Florocarbon is another cool line, but I don't recommend spooling it on a reel as it doesn't handle right. It is a good leader material however, as it is VERY abrasion resistant, invisible underwater, and sensitive. Yo-zuri Hybrid is a nice compromise between Mono and florocarbon, and I use it for most of my leaders. Unlike pure florocarbon, it has enough stretch to use as a leader with superline.

If you like mono but are looking for more sensitivity, other good options are lines like sensation, supermono XXX, sensor, sensithin, etc. They have either thinner diameter or less stretch than normal mono of the same lb test.

I have heard good things about the new IronSilk, but I am pretty unfamiliar with it. My understanding is that it is very limp and very strong. I am unsure of stretch, but I think it is actually THICKER than mono of the same lb test.

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You're right about the iron silk diameter, jwill. I was looking at ****** mt. the other day and noticed that 6 lb. ironsilk was the same thickness as 8 lb. XL. I'll probably try some anyway, but I'm partial to smaller diameter line.

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i'm not a pro staffer, but this is what i was told by people in the line making industry. mono absorbs water, and the new lines won't. mono bellies in the water, the new lines run straighter, especially when making a turn while trolling, or fishing a current. a lure can be cast farther with the new lines cause the surface is kind of like a golf balls surface which allows less drag through the guides, air, and water. the new line wieghs less. sun and oxidation affects the new lines less.... i quit using mono altogether when one of the manuf. gave me a few spools of the new line to try some years ago. the trouble was that i used the same rods that worked well with mono and missed fish. i didn't replace my rods until toi from cny told me that a different action rod was needed for the new lines. since then, i purchased 7 ft. custom made rods from a builder in calif. who builds rods especially for the new lines. i troll with baby thundersticks and jr. thundersticks(discontinued), or jig, or cast top water stickbaits and chuggers. nothing over 1/4 oz.. i use 4 and 6 pound test line, depending on what i'm fishing for and thats strong enough. jwilli said it all when he mentions missed fish. everyone i know that's changed to the new lines has the same experience. it took me some time to get used to the new lines, now i really like them. most of us used mono for many, many years, our timing and reflexes become tuned for that, when we change to the new things we may need to re-train the reflexes. so i'm not sure if you need to replace rods. also,i can get 2 seasons out of the new lines, where as mono i'd change a few times throughout the season....whatever works best for the person is what is the best.... i'd give out the rod builders name but i'm not sure if that would be ok due to advertising restrictions. the rods are a little expensive. i'm sure the big fishing/sporting outlets probably have rods as good. Keebo

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