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Taking pictures, photo tips

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1. Beware of your back ground. Look behind your subject. Make sure you have nothing unwanted in the photo. Anything that will take away from your subject usually makes a sub par photo.

2. Fill the view finder of the camera. Zoom in,Zoom out. Try to fit as much of the subject into the picture as possible.

3. Tuck your elbows into your body. Don’t have your arms sticking out. This will result in a blurry photo. By keeping your elbows on your body tucked in, you create more stability. Of course a tri pod if you have one is best.

4.Check the speed of your film and make sure its fit for your conditions. Also use quality name brand film and keep it out of direct heat.

5. Take shots from different angles. Kneel down on your knees, stand on a chair, different angles create atmosphere.

6. Take more than one photo. If your taking a fish picture for example, have your person in the photo look at the fish. Or maybe the deer they shot. The fish or deer is the main object, by having the sub-subject look at the primary subject, the audience will focus more on the subject. People looking into the camera tend to take away from the primary subject. This will give your fish or deer a more admirable look.

7. And last but not least, teach your friend or fishing and hunting partner these few tricks. After all, you’d like to be in the photos as well. And remember, its not how big the fish is or how many points the buck has, it’s the quality of the photo that counts.

Good Luck

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651-271-5459 http://fishingminnesota.com/millelacsguide/
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Good tips! Here's a couple: when taking the photo, keep the sun at your back & not behind the subject. Shooting into the sun can bleach out a good shot. But make sure you don't cast a shadow on your subject. I've spun the boat around or quickly changed spots with the subject to get better lighting. Also, use a flash when necessary. Even in daylight a flash can eliminate unwanted shadows, like around the person's face if they are wearing a hat. And try to smile once in awhile! I always have a camera or videocamera with me. You never know when you'll get that trophy fish. Plus, it's cool to look at old fishing photo albums. Vern

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The person getting their picture taken should be facing the sun.

Make sure the person taking the picture is not casting a shadow on the person getting their picture taken. (Ok, now I just saw vern said the same thing, oh well, it is very important)

Try taking pictures from different levels. Shooting slightly down or up and the object sometimes gives the image a whole different look.

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I would just like to add one more additional tips.
*when photographing fish take the picture of the fish not the person. The person will automatically be in the picture.
*Also keep the hands out the picture if you can at all help it at all.
* Take the sunglsses off.
I have had many picture turn out cruddy but I am strting to get theh knack of it now.

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Lighting/angle of the sun is critical.

Also, I often use disposable cameras, and I have found that you can usually get closer to the subject than what you see in the view finder. (This is especially true for people who wear glasses -their eye is just that much further from the viewfinder. Usually if someone is taking a picture of me, and they are standing too far back, I just ask them to take a couple steps forward.)
If you want to fill the picture, take some practice shots at varying distances, and learn what really is the best distance.

Fish also look bigger if the person holds them out from their body a bit. This can also help give more highlights to the fish.

Nels

[This message has been edited by Nels (edited 02-12-2003).]

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I always use the flash, even when the camera doesn't call for it. In the bright sun there will always be shadows and these are removed. On overcast days, the person and fish really stand out from the background.

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Derek and others offer tremendous photo advice here. As a serious amateur/freelancer who's been published in local mags, I'll chip in too.

1.The best camera to use is the one you're most comfortable/familiar with. The water is no place to be reading instruction manuals, so pack a model you can operate with a minimum of thought.

2. Zoom lenses give you great freedom of composition, and they give you more ways of telling the story.

3. When shooting people and/or fish photos, use flash 100% of the time. Flash eliminates shadows and dark spots, while adding sparkle and highlights to the subject's eyes.

4.The name of the game is "Fill the Frame". Get in close to the subject, and eliminate visual distractions. If you catch a ten pound walleye on Mille Lac, take a tightly framed photo of the smiling angler and their fish. DO NOT include a sweeping vista of the lake or your boat mates. (4B.) If you want to take separate photos of these other subjects, please do, but remember that each photo should have a clearly defined subject or purpose.

5.When photographing people and fish, compose vertically (north and south). This is almost always the most flattering aspect.

6. Be aware of your background. Don't have fishing rods "sprouting" from your subject's head. Avoid arms, legs, hats, etc. straying into the shot.

7. Mom was right...there's nothing wrong with looking nice. Remove sunglasses and tilt hats upward. We want to see your eyes!! Greasy, slimy t-shirts are not attractive, and most people don't remember Lynrd Skynrd. There's a reason that guides dress well--it makes them look professional.

8.Many aspects of fishing are interesting. Take close up shots of lures, rods, reels, bait etc. These all help tell the story.

9. Time on the water is valuable, but film is cheap. Take lots of shots of everything, and keep only the very best.

10. Keep your camera out and ready to go. Take pictures of the fight, the landing, and the release.

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Another tip would be don't frame the picture rectangular all the time. Sometimes turning the camera at a different angle creates some cool pictures.

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For pictures submitted for publication, include shots holding a rod so that it looks as if you just brought the fish in the boat. Have the person look at the fish instead of the camera. Also vertical shots will be chosen over horizontal shots every time for cover shots.

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