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Seaduck

Which GPS should I get???

16 posts in this topic

I have a Magellan 330M and am very happy with it. I have also had a Garmin but I find the menus and settings to be easier and more intuitive on the Magellan. It has a basic map of the US installed on it and came with a coupon for a CD with detailled maps that can be uploaded to the unit from the computer. I to thought I didn't need the maps, but now that I have them I find them helpful quite often.

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I am going to purchase a GPS but not sure which one.

I will only use it for hunting and fishing,so I dont need thr city roads and such.

I was thinking of the Garmin e trex legend,or the Magellan 330 M .

I don't know much about them,some say waas capable and such, not sure what that means.

Can I put in cord. from you guys and then go right to that spot??? How accurate are they?

I have been fishing on Big Winni and found 2 sharp breaks I would like to mark real soon, as soon as I figure out which GPS to buy. I think I could find them again,within the next week or so.

Thanks guys for any help and info.

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Don't buy one...You will become dependent and that is not good. Don't waste the money, give it to a church.

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i have an e-trex legend and i also got garmin's mapsource US topo software to support it. the legend has a built in base map,which i found comes in handy at times. i dont go in the woods without it, even when i know where i am at or going. its saves time trying to remember things(sign)from time to time and the locations. i just mark it and move on. when i get home i download it into mapsource and thats that. when you dont need it you delete it or upload it back into the unit. the software is in the 100,000 series, which i like the 24,000 series (more dtail). the makers of that software are unable to download their stuff into any gps.

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Bigfoot, I've had a couple units and I now have settled on the Magellan 330M. I really like it, I think you might too. Polar Bear

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I think that is the one I am going to get as well. Sounds like a pretty good unit,and it should do everything I want it to do.

Thanks for everyones help!!

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the garmin gps map 76 has waas capability
(which means it can pinpoint a smaller area)
It also can be programed from your computer
by downloading any hotspots fishing map software.
You can actually pre program your fishing trip right off your computer!
In my opinion, If you want a gps that is capable of downloading lakemaps ,this is the best available!
I have one and I just love it!
P.S. you'll never be lost, It has built in highway maps too!

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Have any of you guys noticed a large difference in positions between summer and winter? I know my lake spots I save in summer are not the same poition in winter. I can not change the date in my Garmin GPS 12 and I was thinking this may be part of the problem. Going back to the same places in summer is OK, but 6 months later I am always off. Now I have started saving the same positions between winter and summer. Thanks, iceyooper

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have any of you herd of the garmin GPS 72? This is everything this GPS has;

Built-in quad helix receiving antenna
High-contrast FSTN, 4-level gray scale (120 x 160 pixels) display
Backlit display and keypad
Permanent user data storage; no memory battery required
Water resistant, IEC-529, IPX7 (Submersible 1 meter @ 30 minutes) and floatable
500 user waypoints with name and graphic symbol; 50 reversible routes
Position formats include Lat/Lon, UTM, Loran TDs, Maidenhead, MGRS, and user grid
Audible alarms for anchor drag, arrival, off-course, proximity waypoint, and clock
"Large numbers" option for easy viewing
1 MB internal memory for loading MapSource Points of Interest data
Trip computer provides odometer, stopped time, moving average, overall average, total time, max speed, and more
Automatic track log; 10 saved tracks let you retrace your path in both directions
Course and speed filtering
Built-in celestial tables for best time to fish, plus sun and moon calculations It is also WAS enabled.

ALso, is 1mb of memory enough? It would mainly be used for fishing spots and sometimes trips to other lakes. I know one has 8mbs i believe. buts its about $200.00 more for the unit.

What other type of hand held GPS's should I also look at? I would like to save lots of points on lakes. Also I like the track back feature that Garmin has, do any of the others have that feature? Also, what about external memory cartridges? I Dont know if the make such a thing but im wondering.

open to opinions would only like to spend up to $250, or around the area.

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I'm a fan of the Lowrance I-Finder Plus. It is really easy to use, and of course the computer downloadability is nice also.

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I have had a Lowrance Global Map 100 handheld unit for about 2 yrs now. Have used it for hunting and fishing pretty steady in the past two years. Absolutly love it, easy to use, very accurate, and seems to be durable. It also has the software and computer cable if you so desire although to date I have not purchased it and haven't really needed it. As I recall the unit was around the $200 mark. Just my two cents.

Chow

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BIGFOOT,

I know a good HSOforum for you to check out if your still interested in doing some research before you buy. I tried to post it earlier but it got yanked. Let me know and I can e-mail it to you.

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northern blue

Thanks I went there before it got pulled.Saved it, lots of great info there.

Moderators,sorry we should have e-mailed each other.

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garmin 12 and dont buy it at a store. Go to www.gpsworldsupply.com. Here that unit will cost you $99 anywhere else about $140. This unit is user friendly and a good unit for the money. I also have a lawrance global map 100 and like it but for just marking your fishing hot spot go with the garmin

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Bigfoot,

Glad you got the info and saved the site. There is a lot of good info there. I really like the "What's new" link. It keeps you up to date with all the GPS software updates.

Moderators, I too apologize. The site I posted about doesnt actually sell GPS or accessories so I didn't think it would be a problem. I won't do it in the future.

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