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Bushwacker

What strength of Rods does everyone use?

25 posts in this topic

Just wondering what power of rods everyone uses. Light, Medium Light, etc. Just wondering what others favorites are and what they use for different species.

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i like the medium light for all the species i go for. they have alittle backbone with enough bend to have some fun.
my favorite rod is the ugly stick right now.

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For my all around every day rod I like med.fast-fast action with solid im-7 graphite for sensitivity(jigging,casting, 3waying)

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You talking ice fishing or summer? Either way, there's an answer for every type of fishing you can imagine. I have a number of rods that match different types of fishing situations better or worse.
For ice fishing I typically prefer light to medium-light rods with very fast action. The speed of the tip is by far the most important spec for me with a jigging rod. Action vs. speed is an often misunderstood deal for many people. For most of my ice fishing I prefer a light rod with a really fast tip- it equals a good fight and lots of sensitivity. However, I also own a noodle rod and a few stiffer rods depending upon the situation. You gotta match the situation or you'll be missing out. cool.gif
Scoot

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Speed is a description of the length of flexable area in the tip. A fast rod might be a graphite medium and heavier. A slow rod might be a medium-light old fiberglass.

I use a medium/fast graphite one-piece for a general purpose spinning (with a major in walleye jigging), an 8' medium-light/slow fiberglass for shallow water bassing and a 5' ultralight for panfish. I don't have it yet, but I'm gonna get a medium-heavy midspeed 7' fiberglass for river cats. My back-up general spare is a 6' mid-speed fiberglass.

If it's sensitivity you want - fast action. If you want the rod to take a lot of shock for you - slow action. The slower the action, though, the more hook-set sweep your arms are gonna have to perform.

Experiment - some decisions can be made purely for fun - tht's why I use a short ultra for panfish so I can make more accurate casts and small fish feel bigger.

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RobertC

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RobertC,

I followed all of your description of rod speed in terms of applications, but I'm missing something on the description about what it is. You obviously get the gist of it, though. Fast = sensitive, slow = good shock absorbtion.

The speed of any rod blank is primarily determined by the taper seen in the blank. Rods that have a dramatic difference between the diameter of the butt and tip will have faster actions. Ones that have less difference between the two will be slower. Admittedly, diameter proportions aren't the only factor here (one foot vs. two foot guides, amount of windings used per foot, other characteristics of the blank), but they are the primary one.
I also agree with RobertC on what goes into deciding what rod to use- pick the one that results in the most fun and function.
I've written this elsewhere, but my dad's been a custom rod builder for a long time and he can talk for hours on this subject. If anyone is interested in getting a really great ice or summer rod, he's a great guy to call. Even if you decide not to get a rod from him, he'll be happy to give you lots of good info for deciding what type of rod will suit your needs. Give him a shout at (218) 891-4415 or e-mail him at: rodsbyengel@netscape.net
I hope all of this info helps!
Scoot

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Thanks for clearing that up, Scoot. My description wasn't real tight, and I'm honestly no expert.
I'll be in the custom rod market when my son (4) gets taller and he's too tall to use an ice combo for open water spinning, and too short for an off-the-rack spinning rod. Hard to find an off-the rack 4' spinning rod.

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RobertC

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I have twenty rods that can handle between 1# test line up to 30#, in open water, rivers, or for ice fishing. Each rod has been chosen for fairly specific purposes. I would recommend starting with a 6 1/2 foot medium action, moderately fast spinning rod. Get a "house" label such as Gander Mountain, Galyan's, or Cabela's (graphite IM7 or IM6). In time you will discover that this is a decent all-around rod but it lacks something in certain situations. After you find yourself frustrated often enough in these special circumstances you can mention the exact problem you are having and we in the FM family or others that have had similar problems can direct you to a specific rod. My own rod rack is fairly adequate but I may need to consult with a custom rod builder (such as Backwater Eddy's friend) to refine my selection. Baitcasters are the next step and a similar middle ground rod is a good place to start.

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Speed of a rod as I know it is determined by how far down from the tip it begins it's bend under load. If the tip folds over it's fast if it bends in the middle of the blank it's slow. Which as stated has alot to do with what's considered limp or stiff. For trolling a down rigger for example you can't have a soft tip. For jigging a 1/64 oz. you logicaly can't have a poplar pole. If you can afford but one pole you need something you can horse a fish if neccesary but have enough feel for finesse. So when you go to look, pull the tip down and compare taking note of what the blank says in terms of heavy medium light or fast slow they all run different from each manufacturer. Even bring a piece of string with a weight and lift it off the floor to get the idea of how it feels,especcially if your spending over 100 clams.
A FISH FOR EVERY CREEL!

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I'm kind of partial to the Genz Rods but I have others as well.

Crappies/gills: 28 inch light ation Genz Rod (2 of them). HT Enterprises 26 inch light action. HT Enterprises noodle rod. Croxton dead stick.

Walleyes/pike: Home made 32 inch medium action (Fenwick blank). Medium action Genz Rod. South Bend Black Ice medium action. HT Enterprises 28 inch medium action.

Perch/walleye: 29 inch medium/light Genz Rod. Thorne bros medium/light.

Lake Trout: Genz Rod Baitcaster. First Ice medium/heavy.

Depending where I'm fishing I might interchange a few.

Good Fishin, Matt.

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Interesting, So let's see if I got this straight.

fishing for panfish, crappies, probably light/fast?

trolling for walleye, medium action, and a little slower?

casting for bass and northern, heavier yet and something slow?

Am I on the right track here?

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Yeah - you're on the right track. The Gapen's rep at the Expo gave me a good summary and demonstrations, and most manufacturers will steer you right - it's in their best interest to educate their customers.
Whaler Madness gave a good bit of advice - 6'-6" medium/fast for starters, and then use your own experiences to guide you further.

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RobertC

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Sounds like most have it, but for those who are talking only about heavy, medium, light, medium/light- these are the action of the rod, NOT the speed. Faster and slower is a different deal than light or medium.
The previous posts about where the rod does most of its bending are true- slower rods bend nearer the butt more, faster tips bend nearer the tip more- but this is primarily determined by the ratio of diameters of the blank at the butt and the tip.
All this talk about rods is getting me excited to get out and jig up some walleyes outta the boat this spring. I can't wait to use my 5'10" med/light fast action jiggin' special. To quote my dad, "when they banned commercial fishing on LOW they tried to take this rod out with the nets."
Yeehaa! I love spring fishing!
Scoot

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Crappie Killer, you need to get to work and quit spending so much time on this site. Taxpayers don't like it. Your buddy Mac has a slow action fishing rod as in SLOW fishing all day.

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That's funny Ripper, I guess all my rods are fast action then!!!

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My favorite open water rod is my gander mountain im8 medium light, it works great for walleyes and just as good for smallies. I also have to put my ultra light pole in here, it is so much fun in to catch smallies on it. For hard water I like my galyans light action ice rod, just enough backbone for 'eyes and light enough for crappies.

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Where I teach we only have school from 10:00 - 1:00. I have 5 hours of prep time smile.gif

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And Mac's a good fisherman. Everything he knows about fishing he shared with me.......

in one afternoon smile.gif


Actually, I wish I knew as much about fishing as he does about bb. Move over Ted Takasaki.

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We talked with Ted at the boat show in Fargo on Sunday. He said he can't wait to go to Saginaw Bay in his new Ranger boat and smash the first 4 foot wave he sees.

Get to work Killer!

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Hey I could do that. What would a 4 foot wave do to a 20 foot pontoon?


You'll soon be forgetting about Mr. Takasaki.

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