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slick2526

What made you purchase your auger size?

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What hole size/flighting did you choose for gas auger and why?

I have always used a 10" and I swear by it for ice fishing big pike. if you get a a pike over 15lbs I think it would be quite a struggle getting it through a 8in hole.

I have noticed for a lot of anglers the 10" auger has became a thing of the past and I don't really understand why? Is it just the weight issue and staying portable?

I know the auger topic gets beat to death and I am trying not to make this brand vs brand battle. I just want to know whats others think the pro's and con's are of hole size's. Thanks for your time

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Target Fish = Panfish therefore 8"

That's literally the only reason.

But, if I need a bigger hole I can pop 2 side by side.

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Been using the 8in my whole life. Have never had trouble getting a fish through it, 32in walleye, 40in northern. Might go smaller in the future but never will I own a 10in. Seen too many kids get wet legs because of the bigger hole over the years.

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I went from an 8" to a 10" in the wheel house so I can get a few days before the holes shrink to an 8"

Still like an 8" for fish in the portable.

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simple answer for me. First when you have the Transducer and the foam float in a 8" hole. it gets to crowded for me. especialy when Iam jigging.

Second, especially in a wheel house. The ice hole shrinks in Diameter, starting with a bigger hole means I might be down to 8" by the end of a weekend on the ice.

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I only fish in a portable or on a bucket, no need for anything over 8"... Stepped in a few 10" holes in the past,no fun...No float to clutter the hole and yet to see a fish in any waters I fish that won't fit through an 8" hole...

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I also fish lots of panfish and mainly out of a portable and it's a pain to walk around 10" holes. Normally when i do fish walleyes i don't have a problem getting them through the hole anyways.

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I went with a 9". I don't think they make them anymore. I fish lake trout a few days a year and I wanted to make absolutely sure a giant would make it up the hole. I've found that everything I've ever caught would fit up an 8" but it's nice to have a little more room to angle the larger fish up the hole. Larger fish will sometimes get suck with their backs across the hole if you don't pull them straight up properly. That extra inch helps but doesn't eliminate this problem. If I had to buy new I't not sure if I would go with an 8 or 10. I'm happy with my 9" I have stepped in 9" and 10" holes too and once while fishing alone on a lake. Not fun.

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I use a 6". Like the extra room in the portable plus I fish for panfish and stream trout almost exclusively. For the first time a few weeks ago I wished I had an 8". I ended up landing a 25" splake on trout opener and it took multiple tries to get it started in the 6" hole. If this continues to be a problem I may consider stepping up to an 8". The odds are pretty good that the 6" will continue to be just fine. I always pull the transducer at hook up.

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I fish an 8" and that primarily was to minimize the amout of gear able to be lost down the holes. I know for a fact that neither of my flashers nor my kid (my kids head anyway) can fit down an 8"er.... I used to fish with a 6" auger but foud that When I hook into decent sized fish I'd have to fight them a lot longer to land if I landed them at all. That's why I BIGGIE sized. Don't forsee moving to a 10" unless I get a wheelhouse and I dont forsee that happening anytime soon.

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I used an 8" for years and had no problems fitting any fish through it, although a 36" laker was a bit touchy. I now make two trips every winter to Canada for lakers, though, so the last auger I bought was a 10". It's a little easier to get them to turn the corner with the larger hole, and if I do ever hook into that 30 pounder, I'll be glad I have it. I do end up using the 10" almost all of the time now. It's nice for sight fishing perch late ice, and even panfish around the metro I like not getting tangled in the transducer as much. I pretty much only use the 8" when I have the wheelhouse out just because a 10" auger won't work with out HSOList.

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8" on my power auger for me was a no brainer. I fish panfish a lot, followed by walleye and sometimes northerns. the 8" hole gives plenty of room for a transducer and float, and any fish I expect to catch. I caught a very girthy 42" musky last winter and it came through the 8" hole easily enough. With that said, if I fished somewhere that had good potential for 20 plus pound pike or lake trout I can see how a 10 inch hole could make landing them a little easier.

Reasons for me to not get a 10" hole:

- Stepping in them IS a very real possibility. I've done it even wearing my bulky Lacrosse Ice Kings (wind blown snow covered the old hole).

-Extra couple pounds on the auger bit

-longer time to cut a hole

I'm sure some people have reasons a 10" hole is best for them, but 8 is perfect for me.

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Lots of pros and cons to both. One thing for sure is that a 10" hole has a lot more sluch to scoop out. This past weekend up at LOW I used both 8" and 10" holes. We actually drilled vexlar holes next to our fishing holes to avoid the messy fish/transducer tangles. It worked very well. I have an 8" and I am happy with it....

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I still use my 10" for pike fishing with tip ups.

But I like my little 8" elect big volt for the wheel house, it does a great job at reopening holes, which has more to do with the stepped chippers and really nothing to do with it being an 8". But I'm targetting eyes in the wheel house, so even an 8" hole that's shrunk a little from being a few days old is plenty for the walleyes.

Bigger the diameter, the more leverage it takes, more power/strength etc.

I'm not getting younger... grin

I lost a pike in a 10" tip up hole on LOTW when the leader broke with the fish mouth at the top of the hole. There was no room along side that big girls head to slip a hand alongside, she was a tight fit in a 10" hole.

No gaf, not so much as a glove or even a stocking cap to stuff in her mouth to try and pull her out.

It all only lasted about 8 seconds and she was gone.

She wouldn't have even started up an 8" hole.

So, when I'm targeting big pike, I like a big hole.

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When I purchased my first power auger I got the 10 inch because I had a 8X16 perm on Mille Lacs lake and thought it would be better than the smaller size , was I right Yes and No, The ten was great for fishing out of and running a transducer in the same hole, but that in my opinion was about the only plus for it. It meant more ice in the hole and on the shack floor it also meant it was a little slower and it worked that old mag3 quite hard, and I got to see a couple of big eyes do a 360 degree turn aroubnd in that hole with ease

another thing was once the house came off and it was time for late ice or even early ice it was deffinatly more weight to lug out on the ice.

I was given a 7 1/4 auger bit with a chipper blade and it was really alot nicer it also didnt seam to freeze up as fast in the house.

I purchase a used auger and it came with a 9 inch lazor blade while its fast and all, I still think its a bit much but still use the 7.25 chipper the most. Its like the blades just don't get dull I know they do but this one has been on for 3 years and still cuts good.

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Wish i had the problem of not being able to get a fish through a 8 inch hole

lol I do think any of the fish i have caught or seen caught would of fit through a 8in hole. I know there is reasons why a gaff was made... I just think a 10in hole makes things easier specially if you are fishing tip-ups.

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Fish can turn & go down easier in a bigger hole. I lose less in the 7" than the 8" but the 7" just seems too small after all of these years. A splash of boiling water a couple times a day will keep those holes wide open if your house is banked properly.

I have a bud that uses 6" on LOW. I don't mind fishing with him at all but the big pout can be tricky.

ND. You always have been a wordy bugger. grin

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A 10 inch hole has a 31.42 circumference. An 8 inch hole has a 25.14 inch circumference. Both will handle a very big fish. The hardest part about getting a big pike up a hole is just getting them started up the hole. In my opinion, where the fish is hooked in the mouth (snout vs side) has a bigger effect on getting the fish up the hole successfully than hole size does.

10 inch holes claim more lost gear and more wet feet than an 8 inch hole does. They also take up more valuable real estate in a potable fish house.

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I like the bigger hole in the house, but with kids an 8" seems just fine. She even said she don't think she will fit in the hole. If I pull the transducer it works just fine. Just being able to get out and fish is the most important I guess.

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I have always used a 10". It is nice that you have plenty of room for a transducer and don't have to worry about hole freezing up as fast. The only time I ever stepped in a hole is when my size 15 slipped in a 6" hole. Sprained my ankle and slowed me down for three weeks.

I have heard the stories of guys losing there Vexilars down a 10" hole. I checked. Only way mine will fit is if I bust it into pieces.

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