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Harmonica Bear

Canvas Repair

10 posts in this topic

Hi everybody!

I have a fish trap with some holes in the canvas. Anybody have any ideas on inexpensive canvas repair? Thanks in advance - Bear.

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Depending on how big the holes are. This might sound funny but I used roofing tar on mine 3 years ago and it still holding up today

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I use the heavy-duty iron on canvas patches, they can be found at most craft stores.
They work great and come in many colors, for high use areas put them back to back.

GF

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Go to your local hardware store and ask for some "Tear Grease". If they don't know what it is, leave (politely of course). Find someboday that has it (look in yellow pages under 'tents' or anybody that handles canvas) and buy some from them. We've used it on our hunting camp canvas for years.

You will need some scrap canvas of approximately the same thickness. It comes out as liquid and sets up kinda like rubber cement. Just follow the directions on the bottle, and stick on your patch. Very easy to use, durable, and no mess ... as opposed to things like 'roofing tar'.

Tear grease is a canvas standard.

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Good advice Matt. I've used the "Tehr Greeze" many times on my trap and all patches are still intact. It is a blue and white bottle that says VALA-A Tear Mender on it. Dont get it on anything that you dont want glued cause it wont come off

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Yup, Matt has it right, fixed many a hole with that stuff. Works great on repairing blue jeans, coveralls, etc. Know a bunch of iron workers who reinforce the high wear areas of their clothing right off the bat with that stuff. As mentioned above, don't get it where you don't want it!

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You can use the iron-on patches, but they are more hassle than the better option. Go to the fabrics section in Wal-Mart and buy patches made from the same material as the iron-on, but are self-adhesive. Never thought they'd hold, but the patches I put on are on their second season, and a couple of them are on those sections that curve and wrinkle when you collapse the trap.

Make sure you put them on the inside of the trap. Make sure the fabric is flattened so you don't put the patch over wrinkles, and press and rub and buff like the devil to make sure you've got a good seal.

I think you get a bunch of nice-sized patches for about $2.99.

Good luck.

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Use sportsmans goop. You can buy it in the adhesive area in your local hardware store and that stuff works great. Plus it dries clear. Good luck

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