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fishlips

Adding Glycol Solution to a Taco boiler (in-floor heating)

12 posts in this topic

Our cabin has a Taco boiler that heats the water/glycol solution for the infloor heat. The pressure is very low (20 - 30 psi) and needs to have fluid added according to a neighbor.

There is a spot to add fluid - its a standard hose outlet, but I'm not sure if this is an easy task, what pressure I should be seeing or what specific tools are required. Can anyone shed any light on this? Is a certain grade of glycol required? The current glycol/water solution is fairly clear with a very slight tint (yellowish tint?).

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When in doubt, keep out.

I would start calling around and find someone with a boilers licence. Preferably someone with a licence and someone familiar with a "Taco" boiler. And systems like yours.

Special care has to be taken when adding water/glycol to a boiler loop. To much and KABOOM!!!!!

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What kind of pressure are you seeing now?

Why do you think you need to add glycol?

Your pressure will rise when you begin to heat your system.

More than likely you have a 30lb. relief valve. If your pressure exceeds that it will pop.

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my shop system has worked flawlessly for years on 20lb pressure. you could check the presure relief valve to see what pressure it'll open up at, I think mine is 30lb

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Plumber here. When we install new boilers residental units, we keep pressure between 18 and 25. Relief valve will go at 30psi.

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Schmoe -

I'll have to re-check the current pressure. Is the 18-25 figure that you quoted for the wall mounted, Taco brand system? Is it normal for an enclosed, infloor heating system like this to slowly lose pressure over time (from very slow fluid loss)?

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Shouldn't be fluid loss unless your relief valve is going off. If that's the case, you may have the pressure too high or the temp too high. Otherwise, you are going to want to find the leak and fix it.

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Pressure will rise and fall as the temp rises and falls. I have in floor heat and only run around 15-20 psi and that is at 140 temp.

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Had a chance to check the pressure - its running at 14psi, whic is a little on the low side. I would assume that these systems have to slowly lose some pressure over time. I'll contact an installer to add the solution.

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Plumbers are plumbers not pipefitters someone that knows what a boiler system is suppose to run like and why! not what their boss told them to fill it to. PSI 15-20 you shouldnt need to add pressure unless there is a leak somewhere. or you might have an automatic airvent which might cause this. there is only one way to test your glycol take a sample to a heating contractor.

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I do many handyman jobs around the house, even "plumbing" that consists of unclogging drains, placing shims under bathtubs so they don't squeak, fixing leaks, etc. ("plumbing," ha!) But for this I would call in a professional as you may save a little making your problem a whole lot worse. We have in-floor heat and I got it checked out once for just over a hundred bucks (labor). At the time, it seemed like it was struggling and indeed, something was wrong with the circuit board and not the boiler, tubes or fluid. The circuit board was another $150 on top of the previously mentioned labor. But my point being, unless you are really sure of what you're doing, the quickest, easiest and inevitably CHEAPEST solution in the long run is to call in the professional.

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