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SLABKILLA

Almost there boys (grouse opener)

23 posts in this topic

You can feel it in the air. Going to be a great season, anyone else pumped for the upcoming season? Opener is usally warm and the leaves are still up, but it's going to be hard to stay home with the grouse numbers this year.

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I gave the over/under a good oiling last weekend in anticipation. I can't wait to beat the brush for the first time this year. I'm sure I won't be able to see it (due to cover) but nothing compares to the heart stopping first flush of the season.

I did some scouting two weeks ago in the area I hunt and my GSP bumped a few coveys. It appears promising.

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Sunday afternoon I re-organized all my upland stuff in my "Hunt/Dog Suuply Box". Everything from shells to first aid kit in its proper place.

I am pumped as well!!!

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Quick question for you guys, can you legally harvest a grouse with a slingshot?

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I sure the heck hope so Duffer! Otherwise there are many young lads out there who got their first partridge illegally.

I have seen them killed with rocks, sticks, bow and arrow, shotgun, rifles, handguns, bb guns, and one that killed himself in a high speed collision with a popple tree as he zig-zagged to avoid a load of 8 shot.

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That's what I figured, thanks JPR. The pellet gun is staying home (trying to cut down on weight) for my fall trip, but I still want something for camp varmit control. And if Mr Partridge wants to challenge my wrist rocket skills around camp, I think I'm up for that challenge. smile

I've also had a tree jump out in front of a flying grouse. wink

"Partridge" you northern boys have been cracking me up with that term for darn near thirty years. laugh

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Getting very very pumped! It sucks that I won't be living in Northern MN this year, but will definatly still be making some trips up there. Going out for opener since its a tradition with some friends, but will probably wait until late season for other trips. I am guessing everyone is going to come out of the woodworks this year with the big drumming count increase.

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I am guessing everyone is going to come out of the woodworks this year with the big drumming count increase.

Mabe... I think grousing (pun intended) is growing in popularity, but I dont know that EVERYONE is going to start in on it just because counts are up. But we will see, I have been wrong about other things.

It will be hard not to venture out and about on opener, but I am leaning more twards a few of the weeks following it. Let the "one and done", and the "road hunters" get it out of their system the first weekend.

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I spent all summer up near International falls and there are definately a few around. I've talked to loggers and some park rangers and everbody is seeing some so I'm pretty pumped. I might hunt the first weekend a little but nice to wait a couple weeks. The best weekend to go is the weekend that pheasant season opens. The same once and done guys are all south that weekend and I like pheasant hunting in the snow anyway.

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There will be more people out this year with counts up, you can bet on it. I go out on the opener regardless if foilage makes shooting difficult or if there are a lot of people. It gives the dog work, worst case scenario. I also try to go every weekend: so too many leaves, too many hunters, crappy weather... I try not to let any of it bother me and go and enjoy what I like to do the most; walk the trails with Gus the Dog.

I try to plan hunts on other game openers as well. Pheasant opener this year I'll be in LOW Co. for 4-5 days hunting grouse. Usually try to time it with duck opener instead, but didn't work out this year.

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I don't know on earth what you guys are talking about..pumped....I'm beyond pumped....The gun is ready!....The dogs are in shape and chomping at the bit..The weather is cool at night..My upland box is stocked and ready. I got my high brass 7 1/2 's shined and placed neatly in the ammo box!...Now I'm just waiting for the Monday after opener when everyone else has gone home for the week to make my move...To my favorite covert to take a few early season tasty treats from the woods!!!

jingle jingle jingle..Stop.....silence......beep......beep........whir...........BOOM....thud....might be the greatest sequence of sounds known to man......At least this one!!!..Have a great season..uplander

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Wisconsin grouse opener is tommorow though for those who just can't wait until next week!

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Went to a game farm yesterday with some buddy and got our pups on some birds... cleaned the shotgun and packed my grouse box tonight... I can only make a day trip this weekend but I am ready to go. Good luck to everyone!

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The boots are clean. The guns are cleaned. The camper is ready except the food & supplies. My dog got trimmed last night to minimize the burrs and the heat. He's as ready as he can be. I just have a few more things to pack and I'll be ready. The 4 hours at work tomorrow are really going to be tough. Good Luck to all!!

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I've got everything packed and sitting on the table in the basement. Nix-waxed boots, recently treated waxed cotton chaps, 5 boxs of newly reloaded 1oz 7.5', and I even vacumed the feathers out of the vest from last year. My trucks at the body shop right now, I'm hoping I get it back tomorrow morning, or I'll be renting a pickup before heading north. I can't wait. I've even got two nice big bones for the dogs to work on while were at the shack relaxing at night.

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leaving work in 1 hr, 15 min & 30 s, 29 s, 28 s, ...

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No complaining! I have to work this weekend and have a wedding to attend next weekend. My countdown is still at 14 days. Good luck to everyone heading out, and I look forward to seeing some reports/pictures!

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