Guests - If You want access to member only forums on HSO. You will gain access only when you sign-in or Sign-Up on HotSpotOutdoors.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
shizzy

how sharp should the hooks be?

16 posts in this topic

I lost a good sized Northern yesterday on Minnetonka. Im positive 99% of it was me not getting a good hook set as I was sitting and having a smoke while casting, but upon checking out the treble hook on the new Mepps I was throwing I noticed the hook wasnt as sharp as most hooks. it didnt pass the "scratch your fingernail" test.

Its a Mepps "Musky killer" and the lure and its treble are larger then what Im used to throwing.

should I hit the points with my trusty hook sharpener or do I just need to learn to set the hook like a real man?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am going to blame it on the hooks. You get some that are just not up to par. Give them the once over and sharpen them up. On that note...set the hook like a man!!! Just kidding.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On that note...set the hook like a man!!! Just kidding.

All kidding aside, a bucktail like the Musky Killer has thick, heavy treble hooks ---- and it takes more force to drive them through for a good hookup than the smaller, thinner trebles you'll find on crankbaits and rattlebaits, etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I always set the hook 2 or 3 times quickly. Sometimes they have such a grip on the lure that 1 set does not get the hooks to slide into flesh. It's not the sharpness of the hook as much as the fish's grip on lure that gives us the misses.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I rarely pitch any hook out, be it fishing bait for sunpike, trolling for nortons, or waiting for a flathead, without sharpening my hooks myself...I like upping my odds, and I can make ANY hook sharper than it is off the shelf...You never know when big Louie will show up, and I want every chance to snag em'!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

give it a good sharpening. On a second side note, the mouth of a pike and muskie is quite hard and can be very difficult to get a hook in.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"give it a good sharpening. On a second side note, the mouth of a pike and muskie is quite hard and can be very difficult to get a hook in."

Agreed! And as stated . Those fish can clamp into a lure where you get little hook movement so you need them sticky sharp!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good topic!

When I do my fishing seminars I often start it off with a simple question..."What is the most productive thing in your tackle box?".

I get the answers I expect...Rapala's...Jigs...a Hoopa Popper, a Gitchi-Goomy Gambler in Granny's Panty's Pink....ect...ect..ect.

Then I tell them, for me, it's this...and whip out a $4.00 hook file. I get a blank stare most of the time..but I'm dead serious.

Lures do not catch fish, hooks do, and sharp hooks do it more effectively.

The best investment you can make is a good hook file, and build from there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In your opinion Ed, what's the best hook file on the market?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What's the proper technique to getting the sharpest hook possible. Any pictures or diagrams? I sharpen mostly 4/0 - 5/0 hooks.

WS

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like the reasonably priced high carbon steel files...your basic 2 sided $5 file you see with the bright yellow or red handle. Stones tend to get wet and do not last long. DMT makes an exceptional file, it is called a Diafold Diamond Flat File, but far more expensive. I'm cheap so the $5 file is good tell it is worn, than I replace it.

Thin cheap-o flat files can reach into any hooks, beveled sides, light and easy to store but have a handle long enough to manipulate well. The tiny hook files, I loose them in a day..not sure where..they are lost when I need them none the less.

t_184.jpg

I stroke the hook so the file works to the point away from the shank. A couple pass's on each side will usually do it.

1) Firmly hold your hook

2) Draw your file across the barb toward the point. Repeat this stroke several times while making sure you hold the file at the same angle each time.

3) Repeat the same strokes on the other side.

4) Make a few final strokes on the bottom of the point. This will form a triangular point.

5) Test the hook for sharpness by running it across your finger nail as described earlier.

If the point is beaked slightly, I roll out the damaged point straight first and than make even passes on each side tell it is sharp.

There is always the point where replacement of the hook or jig is the best option...just too far gone to repair. So I carry common sizes of treble hooks in my crankbait box's so I can swap them out as needed. Same thing with other bait hooks, or jigs, plenty of spares on hand.

Often a light coating of rust on a hook slows the hook effectiveness, so as a practice I stroke the kook a pass on each side right out of the tackle box before it gets wet. Than I know, it's ready to do it's job.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great tip. Last night I got hung and when I finally got it loose I checked the hook and the tip was actually bent over. A few strokes from the file and I had it razor sharp again. It pays to check your hook often.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How sharp should they be? As sharp as you can get 'em!

After an outing in salt water relying on equipment provided for me where the hooks were dull, I realized how many fish could be lost due to bad hooks.

I'm in fact purchasing a hook file sometime this week so I don't repeat the same incident.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use a small flat file like the kind you find in the mini file sets..It's easier to use on small hooks, as the big ones are just to bulky to easily get in there...Also works fine on my trebles and big hooks...I also don't like stones for the same reason...I sharpen mine stroking towards the bend, but thats just how i taught myself...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have both a small smooth file,for larger treble hooks and a small hone stone for jigs. I cut a small groove into the side of the stone for hook to follow. It makes them sticky sharp.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know I won't use a gold jig until I have run my file across it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0



  • Posts

    • We live in some sort of Bizarro world now - Sarah Palin calling Trump sinfully stupid.     Here's another one from Ann Coulter, who literally wrote a book "In Trump We Trust"    
    • You do realize that if the taxes were done that way, the cities would get $2.53 billion richer, and rural areas would get $2.53 billion poorer. The 7 county metro pays substantially more taxes (nearly 2/3 of the states total) than the other 80 counties in Minnesota combined, but only receives roughly half of the state expenditures.   Sorry to break it to you, but rural America is not fiscally solvent. Those citiots you speak of are bankrolling the entire country. It's easy to see on this chart: more urban states are to the left (givers) and more rural states are to the right (takers).  
    • I tried to purchase the screws yetti uses from Fastenal who is their vendor for the screws. They are only sold in large reels designed for a self loading screwgun. I finally called Casey at Glacial lake docks where I purchased my yetti and he sent me out the amount I needed. They work great to add additional fir strips. The plastic used to tie them together comes right off as you screw them in. Hope that helps. 
    • Sorry...was wrong on the specs.   Manufacturer is Core Ice.  It was 1450# for a 12' and 1250# for a 8'.  
    • I believe you want to use a zinc coated or galvanized steel according to the charts.  I'm sure someone will come along to correct me
    • In the back room there is a company that is using bonded foam panels (similar to garage door panels, but really clean looking), and had weights of 1250# for a 12' and 1450# for a 16'.  Aluminum trailer frames that could convert to a skid frame.  Can't recall the name.  I'm sure they were spendy, but I can see a concept like that going somewhere for the hardcore fishing crowd.   Yetti, Firebrand, Big Bite, and Glacier all had really nice display models.      Lots of campers (disguised as fish houses) out there at prices that make me want to jump into the business.  I was in two different manufacturers houses with prices well over $30k that had wire nuts for connections.  That is going to be a fun adventure for someone 2-3 years down the road when they find out their manufacturer saved $15 on their wiring.           
    • Thank you for all the help!  Ended up going with the Marcum VS485C.  After some research, there were a few other Marcums that were on the list (825 & 625), the Aqua Vu HD, and the Pan Cam.  The mini cams from all manufactures weren't what I was looking for, but they are cool and do have their place.     After seeing everything in person, I think the Aqua Vu HD had the best camera/screen.  The Marcums were a little bit behind, but the 825, 625, 485, and Pan Cam had similar real life clarity.  The 485 won out because of the $300 price point vs the others at $450-700, and was almost identical for resolution, other than the HD.
      I honestly think these cameras are all about 5+ years behind in technology in comparison to the broader camera/tv screen market.  Running off a 7-9ah battery is probably one of the limiting factors.  Another may be the cold.  The main reason (IMO) is that the manufacturers are hoping they can incrementally rape us by trickling out technology each year, similar to the computer manufacturers of the 90s/early 2000's.  For the price of a middle of the road underwater camera, I can buy a Chinese made 50" TV (these all have Chinese made 5-8" screens) and a GoPro or Sony Action Cam (which is 10x's the picture quality).       
    • Any newcomers in the wheelhouse business at the Ice show in St. Paul?
    • Im sure it's hard to see through your Liberal tears.  
  • Our Sponsors