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Jim Jensen

Red Berries

11 posts in this topic

And widely planted for birdscaping. That is what the waxwing is eating in my avatar. Hope these are in your yard!

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I gave thought to planting one just so the waxwings would be there in the spring for a photo opportunity.

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Aside from their proven bird-attracting abilities, high-bush cranberries add a striking and handsome look to a landscape. Their growth pattern is tall and full, and the leaves turn a beautiful autumn red. They're also very hardy and rarely winter kill up here.

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No they are not in my yard but they are in a public park not far from my house. I will be watching for the Cedar Waxwings. From what I read online they nest in late summer. Last year a co-worker pointed out a Cedar Waxwing to me while we were out taking a break. I kept my eye and camera on her and found that she was nesting in an crab apple tree. I was able to get pictures of here and her brood. Not very good pictures but since I had never heard of or seen a Cedar Waxwing I was thrilled.

P1010433.jpg

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Nice story, Jim. Very neat encounter, and thanks for sharing the photo that will always help you remember the moment. Both waxwing species are pretty darn cool, and it's a nice boost just to spend time in their company. smilesmile

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Wow didn't realize there was a Bohemian Waxwing also. I am going up to the Duluth area tomorrow. I will be keeping my eyes open for one. According to my bird book they can be found in that area.

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Jim, you only find the Bohemian waxwings in winter up here, but there are plenty of cedar waxwings around. Nothing quite like the sight of a red-phase ruffed grouse in an autumn high-bush cranberry. smilesmile

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When the mayflies are hatching on the Rush river I spend as much time watching the Waxwings as I do fishing. They are very adept at catching them on the fly.

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