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Big Game Knives

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I don't remember ever seeing this topic here. I am wondering if anyone can recommend a must have set of field knives. I see a lot of different types on the Outdoor Channel. Outdoor edge kits (and/or the swing blade), Primos has a set, etc. I have always just used a folding lock-blade, but I could see where a gut hook and skinning blade could be very helpful.

What are some thoughts?

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I use a Buck Pro-Line General knife, 7" fixed blade and also use a saginaw saw for the pelvis and have another skinning knife.

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Original Marble's Knives are the best I have ever used. They hold a razor sharp edge and with little care seem to last forever. I own several that are well over 50 years old.

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I use a small 3" lock blade and a tail stripper for trapping. Cut in at Y of chest and insert stripper and pull down to pelvic area. Pulling towards rear keeps the hair down . All small so they fit in a pocket or fanny pack. I have 2 or 3 put together so I can have 1 with me at all times when hunting. Been using them for many years and seem to be faster than bigger knives. Also doesn't cut into guts. I don't split the pelvic bone, just cut around rectum and have I have learned not to make a mess. I reach in and pinch off on inside as far to rear and cut. I have seen more folks cut using bigger knives than small ones.

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I have the buck folding lock blade an a buck skinning fixed blade, an the saginaw pelvis thingy, a great set up for the price. Boar

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I have a LeBlanc's knifeworks knife that is the best thing I have ever had my dad bought it for me for trade school graduation the are made buy a guy in theif river falls at a shop in his yard I have gutted 20 deer,cleaned four turkeys and gutted and quartered a moose with it and it's still scary sharp.

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Opinel makes a great knife for the price. I skinned 3 bevaer with one before it needed touching up, and if you have ever done any skinnign that is saying something. Dunn knives are great but you pay for them. If you just need a gutting knife, buck would be the way to go.

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For gutting deer I use a fixed blade buck small game knife. I don't split the pelvis, I cut around the rectum like Motely man mentioned and then tie it off with string before pulling it through. I like a smaller knife for reaching up into the cavity to cut the pipe. For skinning and boning I use a Wustof boning knife. It really does the trick. If I wasn't so lazy I'd proably make a case for it and use it for everything.

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