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fishlips

Finished Carpentry Question - Ripping a board at an angle

12 posts in this topic

I have a 1" x 4" pine board (80" long) that I need to rip for some trim work that I am doing. The top width has to be a little narrower than the bottom width if that makes sense (top needs to be 2 3/4" and the bottom has to be 3 1/4"). I'm trying to compensate for a wall that isn't straight.

I have a basic table saw. Any tips on how to accomplish this? I'm in the cities, so would also be open to bringing it somewhere if anyone has a recommendation.

thanks....

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that's a pretty simple chore. Just make your marks from wide to narrow, draw a line with a straight edge or snap a chalk line and cut it with your circular saw. If you want to you can screw the waste side of the board to you saw horses to secure it while you are making the cut.

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I would draw the line instead of using the chalk line. The chalk has a tendency to blow off when you get the spinning circular saw near it which makes it harder to see. The entire line won't blow away but enough to make it tricky.

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thanks....I didn't even think of using a circular saw, for some reason I was locked on to using the table saw.

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Cut is a little proud of the line then fine tune it with a hand plane.

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Clamp a straightedge to the board to use as a saw guide for a near perfect cut.

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cut upside down, cause the blade will chip the top surface while cutting. just make sure to mark the board accordingly!

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chances are good it would still chip!

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Cut is a little proud of the line then fine tune it with a hand plane.

That will work as long as the cut is a fairly straight one.

If this cut going against a wall or ceiling chances are it will be wavy.

If you want a tight fit that follows the irregularities then use a compass to transfer the profile to the board. Clamp your work, set your circular saw table so you have a slight backcut. Leave the line.

Since the line will be wavy use a belt sander perpendicular to the cut. You'll also keep the angle of the backcut and sand to the line. It'll take the material down fast so watch it.

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Surface Tension's procedure will give you the best fit. This works best for fitting cabinets, v groove work and trim.

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