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chasineyes

Union Dues???

97 posts in this topic

We are in a union at work and I was wondering if were paying a little too much in dues. We have no pension or health plan through them. We pay 76$ a month. Does this seem in-line??

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Most dues are based on your income. Some unions may have a sliding scale depending on your work classifications.

Glenn57 is a union rep, but he is on vacation until Monday and may be able to help you out some more. I was making approx $20/hr and paid $58. Those making $25 or more paid $65.

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What are union dues? what do you get for joining a union and paying dues ? my shop is not union but I have a friend that does HVAC service in the cities and he has been out of a job for a long time he says theres more people than ever on the Bench? why is that doesnt the union nmove people to differnt jobs or employers?

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Generally you have to fund your own pension through a health and welfare plan. your dues go to run the local hall and the international hall some internationals have a pension that pays say 30 bucks per year of service so 300 a month per 10 years.

The cost of dues is something Ive never had a problem with due to the fact we maintain our market share with a portion of our dues.

As for fear of the bench I dont get it, its a tool that the non union uses to frighten its employees, I see it in another way; when I get laid off I have a collective bargaining agreement and a contract that I vote on.

A good friend of mine got laid off in February collected 600 a week for 5 months now he's working 6-7 day weeks for 2000 1 1/2 from home; so if you want to ride the "Bench" you can; if you want to make money there are opprotunitys but they may not be across the street.

I would ask your BA about what the dues go for and how to form some type of health and welfare plan to get a retirement and insurance coverage.

The union is about as scary as the check I cashed today and those union thugs are some of the best guys Ive ever met with good family's supporting and fighting for a living wage in their areas, don't ever be afraid to talk to your hall,, remember they work for you....

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Yeah I have always been interested in unions. I think your right muskiefool I should listen to a Rep or somebody from a union hall.

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Quote:
don't ever be afraid to talk to your hall,, remember they work for you....

Probably the most important statement you could have ever made. Unfortunately, this isn't always the case. My personal experience with union shops wasn't too positive but that doesn't mean they are all bad.

I was a member of the United Steel Workers. We had local unions, which were a part of a national organization and so part of our dues were used for financial support of other non-working members even from other locals within the national group such as those that were laid off or on strike elsewhere in the country.

Part of our dues were used toward paying a salary for our local officers and national officers and staff for the work they do in the union. Sometimes, well probably more than just sometimes, I questioned whether the rank and file got our money's worth but then that's why you vote for new leadership. In my situation the union liked to talk about "all for one" but didn't do a very good job of walking that walk.

My dad was in construction and he belonged to the Ironworker's Union and in fact was a member of two different locals, one out of Duluth and one out of Fargo. In addition to the items I've already mentioned, his union was often instrumental in helping him find employment when he was laid off. This was one time when I saw a union serving its membership.

If you're wondering what your dues are used for, talk to your officers and representatives. You have a right to know.

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I am retiring as of Sept. 1st at 58 yrs of age and 30 yrs of service in the Carpenters. My only regret is that the 41/2 yrs I spent on my ownin a partnership ment that I had to wait until 58 vs 55.

BTW..After being own my own at 30 and then going back in at 34, Mrs. B always had the dues paid up. She didn't want to go through "that" all again. Our window dues are $22/ mo and working dues were right around $2/ hr, as I recall.

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I belonged to the fire fighters union and the dues that came out where near a 100 a month. We had to pay our normal fees, then a part of the went into a pact fund for lobbying. I was able to retire at 46, with enough time to go back to school and find a new career. Do they always work, no, but when it comes down to the BA, everyone will be represented. I agree talk to your rep, go to the meetings, and educate yourself on what is going on with your local. They may be spending your funds on big screen tv's and expensive dinners, if you do not check into it, no one will. Good luck.

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I would encourage you to get involved with your union and learn about it by attended rank and file meetings, unit meetings, etc. I have belonged to the UFCW for over 10 yrs and have been involved in unit meetings, union steward for 2 yrs, voted on to a contract negotiaton commitee, sat on a greivance board for 4 yrs. It is really a learning experience trust me. Now as for your question I work under a 5 yr contract and our union dues increase every yr that we get a raise. So right now we pay $30.70 a month. Under our contract we have 3 classes of pay, class 1 is $15.73 an hour. We also have union health care and a union pension. The health care costs $32.36 a week for family and thats 90/10 co-pay coverage. Our pension is set this yr at I believe .95 for each hr of service.

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Wow you guys pay alot more for dues than I do. Ours are about $30 or $35 a month.

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One important issue to remember, 'the Union' isn't a seperate entity, it's the membership. Learn how the union works, where your dues go, what benefits has the union won for the members?

Apathy is the most prevalent force in every union I've ever belonged to. Any union is only as strong as it's membership.

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'the Union' isn't a seperate entity, it's the membership.

That's the fallacy that gets spread around. While this may be the original intention or goal of organized labor, unions are gradually becoming less of a union for the membership and more of a business entity for itself.

Even in this thread we see indications of unions that offer member benefits that quite frankly should have come from the employer. My guess is they failed to negotiate these things effectively and in order to satisfy their membership, created a plan of their own. Health care is one example. The fact that in order to become employed a person must belong to the union is another example. If unions were strictly for the benefit of the many as they claim, they wouldn't need to force "the many" to be a part. The many would jump at the chance to be part of it.

The line that defines who or whom one works for is getting more gray all the time. Do the rank and file work for the company or the union? How long will it be before the union negotiates a contract as an entity and then fills job positions from its rank and file? How long before the rank and file get their paycheck from the union rather than from the company that hires them? I can see it coming some day similar to a temp agency.

I realize that there is a lot of work involved with serving as a union official but I can also remember the amount we appropriated for the salary of our local union staff and it was equivalent to the same salary I received as an employee of the company I worked for. What exactly was our staff working for....the rank and file or their pay? In the end my position was one of those in our union that was nothing more than one of the pawns used in the negotiation process. We didn't receive the same benefits, such as incentives, that other members within the same union local enjoyed. All for one eh?

One thing that is absolutely correct is that a union is only as powerful or effective as its membership, at least for the time being anyway.

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ours are $76/month. I am a local chairperson and also sit on the executive board, any questions just ask.

Wolfman's statement is right on!!!

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Quote:
they wouldn't need to force "the many" to be a part.

No one forces anyone to do anything you can go work non-union at anytime but probably for less, unfortunately.

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I'm a member of the Minneapolis Plumbers union for the last 11 years dues are $125 a month. I joined at 18 right out of high school and it has been the best decision I have ever made like has been stated above go to your union meeting and see what is going on or speak your concerns to the board they don't know what is happening unless you go to the meetings and let them know.

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Quote:
they wouldn't need to force "the many" to be a part.

No one forces anyone to do anything you can go work non-union at anytime but probably for less, unfortunately.

Not for that company you can't. Once a union is in place at a place of employment, new hirees are required to join or they don't get hired.

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Dont apply its as easy as that, I won't work non union so you wont see me applying at those places; I would bet that they disclose the union status to you when you apply so I don't know why it would be a problem for anyone after disclosure.

My working dues and quarterly dues add up to over 2000 a year but I make 6 bucks more an hour than the average in my county; so the extra 12000 a year makes up for the 2000 pretty fast; I don't mind dues at all.

If you want to see if your dues are doing you any good go to this site and find your occupation and county and compare.

Wages

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I work for a quasi-government agency, and co-workers aren't required to join the union. They do however recieve the very same benefits and pay as the membership. If you ask why they don't join, they usually reply something about a personal difference with whoever is currently in place as the top union rep. in the facility. That being said, I've NEVER heard of any of the non-members offering to give anything back in the form of pay or benefits, or grievance payments, for that matter!

I've also worked in closed shops where you had to join, and yes, it was disclosed before being hired.

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The disclosure part is fine and all but the fact still remains that the union has the company locked up and if the company wants to hire me for my skills and I want to work for said company, I have no choice but to accept a membership in a union.

You say you would never work for a non-union shop. Call me some time when you get laid off, can't find work, have mouths to feed, roof to pay for, and clothing to put on your kids back and tell my you refuse to accept non-union pay.

Talk is cheap.

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This is actually a good discussion and one we talk about a lot. I respect any comment on this thread whether you like or dislike unions. I myself in the line of work I do would never work non-union. The wages, senority, paid time off, vacations, health insurance, and pension is well above the avg. for this area. I was also raised blue collar and pro union and still remember the Hormel strike and Wilson strikes like it was yesterday. We were brought up to rather starve than to scab. Yes times have changed and yes some unions are weak and some are very strong. It all starts with the reps and business agents and then the membership. I do believe that in todays times the unions have changed, most companies have "the right to manage" and the good old days of wild cat strikes and union rallies are gone. Im sure that some locals are instructed by the national union to "not rock the boat" and to keep everyone happy and keep the dues coming in. But IMO working union is a way for me as you have a say and voice in your workforce. And as stated early in the thread about negotiated benefits such as health care, the reason we carry a union national health care plan is because the company could not even come close to getting any health insurer to come close to the rates of Preferred One, and since our labor aggreement has the company paying 90% of the premiums, which comes to be around $1200 per employee each month, it was to their advantage to carry our plan.

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All I knew was low wages and substandard conditions Bob; you'll never get me back LOL, obviously that company is making a good profit off that union labor or it would be different.

The biggest contractors with the highest payrolls and largest contracts are all union around here, one large customer tried doing it the other way many years ago and their still paying 10 fold for it in higher remodel costs.

The city has also learned lessons the hard way and have signed agreements to use only union contractors to get the jobs done ahead of schedule and under budget.

We could argue all day long about this and that and its all good and fun till your checks no good, have card and a wife that can mix her own gas for the weed whipper, will travel.

Player cool

John

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Quote:
obviously that company is making a good profit off that union labor or it would be different.

This is a good point. Can't argue that. There are times when things get carried too far, though....in either direction. It's then that the economy forces a correction and some of us get hurt.

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Ask everyone in Fon Du Lac how good unions are after Mercury moves to Oklahoma in 3 years. Nuff' said.

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I also know of a company that faced hard times and wanted to negotiate some rather painless concessions from the union so it could survive. the union stood fast and the company went under. Thanks for negotiating the workers right out of a job.

I guess I would prefer that MY performance and MY negotiating skills are used to get me what I deserve. If someone else wants to let the union negotiate for them, by all mean, join today. So far, that has worked for me.

And BobT, I agree with you. I dont like it when an employer is locked up. Sure doesnt seem fair. If union life was so good, why not give the employees a choice?

My experience in hiring union subcontractors has also not been that good. Almost all of them take longer than non-union in my personal experience and the cost is more as well. Quality wise is a little more random as well. Some are good, some are not so good. Non-union can be fairly random as well in all fairness.

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Mercury Marine, the world's largest manufacturer of boat and recreational marine engines, issued a statement after the vote saying it would move many of its Fond du Lac manufacturing operations to its nonunion plant in Stillwater, Okla., over the next two to three years. The company said it will continue to operate the Fond du Lac facility for now under the terms and conditions of the existing contract, which expires in 2012.

The average hourly wage now is about $20, the union said. The proposal also called for lower wages for new hires and workers called back from layoffs, and changes in pension benefits

that workers said would have made retirement unaffordable.

Are the union/members there stupid??? So for all their members, instead of making 19$ or 20$ an hour, they will make $0. I guess that makes sense.

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