Guests - If You want access to member only forums on HSO. You will gain access only when you sign-in or Sign-Up on HotSpotOutdoors.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Scott M

DIY mounting boards are done

8 posts in this topic

This was actually a pretty simple project that got dragged out forever. I wanted some nice boards to display some DIY mounts of grouse fans and pheasant skins. I had a few pheasants tucked away, and I got some help gathering a few grouse fans this fall. Over the winter I had the fans spread and dried, and my 6 month old pup decided she wanted her first taste of grouse, and wouldn't you know it, she wrecked the only chestnut red fan I had. Those being quite a bit rarer than the gray morph, I was a little teed up. Luckily, shackbash had an extra chestnut fan he was willing to part with, so he sent one out to me. Shack, if you're reading this, thanks much, and the next one I shoot has your name on it!

So I once again had my skins and fans, but not being the handiest tool in the garage grin and not owning a router, I had to go looking for some help in getting some nice wood boards to mount to. Enter boilerguy. Boiler sent up a whole freakin' box of boards. They all looked really nice. I took a few, and mounted the skins and fans, ordered some engraved plates with the species common and scientific names, and now have a pretty neat looking final product. BG, there is an extra mount with your name on it, and shack, if you would prefer a pheasant, I've got one of those too. I tried to save the better specimens.

I'll once again be giving this a try this fall. It all sort of stemmed out of me wanting to have some grouse boards to put up at the family cabin smack dab in the middle of grouse country, but then it moved into some grouse work.

I don't pretend to be any expert on this, but it is pretty simple. Keep your grouse and cut out the fans and on pheasant work the skin off slowly with a good knife, but go SLOWLY! It gets tricky around the wings and legs. 50/50 salt and 20 mule team borax soap seems to work great on preservation...They've been in my garage all summer and I haven't seen any bugs in them, knock on wood. I have to worry about my dog more than the bugs smile

It was a good project to show what you can accomplish with a little help from some friends. Good luck to all the small gamers this fall, hope you get some birds and give a little DIY mounting a try.

0808092139.jpg

pheasantskinmount.jpg

The pheasant skin is free moving...once on a wall it will hang down straight

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chise....in central Wisconsin the red's are a lot more prevalent than the gray's. It all depends where you are hunting I guess. Good luck on your project. I'm working on covering an entire wall of my garage in grouse fans. I only get 15 or so a season that are big enough and in decent enough shape to hang up, so I'll be at it a while.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Been waitin a long time to see these!!!! grin

Sharp lookin to say the least. Nice work, dude!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quote:
Shack, if you're reading this, thanks much, and the next one I shoot has your name on it!

Do not worry DC31~ smile It was pleasure and I glad it went to something other than hanging on the wall in my garage grin

I hope to get a couple more like that myself this fall wink

Looking very nice by the way!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice work Da Chise!

If you don't mind me asking, how did you do the full body skin mount of a pheasant?

Did you just salt it down afterwards?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just so there is no confusion, I'm using the word mount to describe putting the skins up on a plaque. I'm not actually creating a 3D, skin on form mount.

I usually start my cuts on the keel bone on the breast (the big bone that bisects the breast meat). I'll work down to the vent and up the neck to the head. You have to go slowly along the legs, back, and head. That is where you are most likely to rip the skin since it adjoins to bones in these places and not as much flesh. If you work slow enough, you can use your fingers and only occasionally need to use the knife.

Finish by salting down liberally. Sometimes a second rub of salt is good, especially if you have a bird with a lot of fat under the skin.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, man!

I think I'll give that a whirl this fall. It looks like a great way to display a bird!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0



  • Posts

    • Thanks to Ufatz, I didn't have to make a wasted trip to my mailbox today...
    • YES, they DO shut down if not enough oxygen. Been dealing with that one for almost 15  years of teaching this. They DO NOT have a CO shutoff, that's what I'm trying to hammer into peoples heads. That's what all thermocouples do, shut the gas valve.  A thermocouple is a safety device for some gas appliances. One end of the thermocouple is heated by a pilot flame, and the other end is connected to a gas valve. As long as the pilot light stays lit, the thermocouple holds the gas valve open and lets gas flow to the main burner of the appliance. The sensor on the end of the thermocouple is heated by the flame of the pilot light. The heat generated is converted into micro volts of electricity. This Electricity is enough to open a tiny magnet in the gas valve, and allow the gas to flow. If the pilot light was to blow out, then the sensor on the Thermocouple cools, and then closes the gas valve to the burner. This ensures that when the pilot flame goes out, Gas cannot escape from the pilot. It is automatically shut down.  That's how it works....if there isn't enough O to support the pilot, you might as well hang it up. They've been petitioned to remove their "low oxygen shut off" from their labeling. Best they did was re-word it. 
    • I believe the v-fronts help, but there is always the vacuum on the flat back-end.  I have had both am always surprised by what I'd call the rear drag.
    • Do buddy heaters even have a low oxygen / CO shut off?  My understanding is they have a thermocouple that kills the gas flow if it's not lit, but it will burn as long as there is a pilot light and enough O2 for combustion, which is probably less O2 than what it would take to make you feel like dump.  And even if O2 levels are high, CO can still be off the chart.   Do people get a lot of alarms going off?  Seems like there is going to be CO in my porty just from the buddy heater going even if the conc is well below a danger level.  I figured those things were calibrated for use in places like your house which should be right at about 0ppm, unless it's right next to the furnace.   In a related story, my MIL was house sitting for a friend when the CO detector went off.  She opened some windows and went outside but started getting a headache, naseous, light headed, weak, dizzy, all sorts of symptoms.  Called 911.  Fire department rolled out, ambulance sent.... And the detector was alarming because the battery was almost dead.  CO levels were at 0ppm.    
    • I'll wait patiently on memorial day, veteran's day, the 4th of July, 9/11, Xmas, new years, labor day, or any of the other federally recognized holidays for you to throw up another post with no point.
    • Thinking about building a new Fish House.   Does a "V" Front really make that big of a difference in towing?   Campers aren't "V" front so just wondering. I think I could utilize space a lot better with a regular square front.
    • Did you ever weigh the house?
    • Thanks for the reminder.  The trash goes to the road tonight for tomorrow's pick up.  I'll drag it down the driveway on my way to the lake.    
    • Had to bring the wife back last night anyway but a 3 day run woulda been nice.  I got to play with and feed our granddaughter, get ice gear thawed out and recharge batteries, making lunch and gonna head out for the evening bite.   I have a dream!
    • Thanks Rebelss. You just can't emphasize the importance of a C/O alarm especially with the new fish  houses being built so tight. My service man just ran into a B/O furnace on a no heat after hours call.  Home owner was very lucky and of course no alarm.
  • Our Sponsors