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MARINERMAGNUM

CFL light bulbs?

88 posts in this topic

Anybody use them? I put 12 in my new shop and so far I'm pleased with the light they put out. These are about 20 watts each,but give the light of a 100 watt incand. bulb. I used the "daylight" variety,and when you install a 100 watt reg bulb next to the CFL,the CFL does indeed look brighter. They're a little more money-I think I paid $25 for the dozen,but 240 watts versus 1200-they should pay for themselves.

Anyone else use them?

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I would say that 75% of the bulbs in are house are now CFL. There has been so much incentive by Minnesota Power with the instant rebates it is dumb not to do it and I can make it brighter for cheaper-win win in my book.

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Use them all over.

One thing to be careful about. Not all CFLs are rated for use in enclosed fixtures or recessed cans and the sales clerks at many places that sell them rarely know this. I was in a Menard's recently and asked for some CFL flood lights to use in the recessed cans in my kitchen. They assured me that the ones they sold were okay to use. I showed them on the packaging where it specifically stated that the bulbs were not suitable for enclosed fixtures. Their response was that it must be okay because their display case used them that way.

In fact, I find it difficult to find CFLs rated for use in enclosed fixtures and recessed cans. You'll waste your money to do so because they won't last as long as an incandescent in that application. I found out the hard way when I used them without first verifying the application.

Something to keep in mind.

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They are better than they were. when we first got em I took em back out and went back to regular bulbs. They also are not any good in fixtures that stay on for less than 10-15 minutes at a time, something about the warm up time it takes, and if not allowed to warm up they blow out early. We have certain lights that pretty much stay on at all times just do to the layout of the house and they have been flawless for 2 or so years.

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I refuse to use them in my house. Heres a little sample of what the Goverment recommends

Carefully pick up glass fragments and place them in a glass jar with metal lid (such as a canning jar) or in a sealed plastic bag.

Use sticky tape, such as duct tape, to pick up any remaining small glass fragments and powder.

If vacuuming is needed after all visible materials are removed, vacuum the area where the bulb was broken.

Remove the vacuum bag (or empty and wipe the canister), and put the bag or vacuum debris in a sealed plastic bag.

4. Clean-up Steps for Clothing, Bedding, etc.:

If clothing or bedding materials come in direct contact with broken glass or mercury-containing powder from inside the bulb that may stick to the fabric, the clothing or bedding should be thrown away. Do not wash such clothing or bedding because mercury fragments in the clothing may contaminate the machine and/or pollute sewage.

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I refuse to use them in my house. Heres a little sample of what the Goverment recommends

Carefully pick up glass fragments and place them in a glass jar with metal lid (such as a canning jar) or in a sealed plastic bag.

Use sticky tape, such as duct tape, to pick up any remaining small glass fragments and powder.

If vacuuming is needed after all visible materials are removed, vacuum the area where the bulb was broken.

Remove the vacuum bag (or empty and wipe the canister), and put the bag or vacuum debris in a sealed plastic bag.

4. Clean-up Steps for Clothing, Bedding, etc.:

If clothing or bedding materials come in direct contact with broken glass or mercury-containing powder from inside the bulb that may stick to the fabric, the clothing or bedding should be thrown away. Do not wash such clothing or bedding because mercury fragments in the clothing may contaminate the machine and/or pollute sewage.

Uh,OK. I guess I'd follow those same guidelines if I broke a 4 foot flourescent light tube-how about an 8 footer? Sounds like common sense directions to me. I guess if you want a safe light bulb that lets you leave some shards of glass in your bed or undies-that's cool. That's always a big turn on for my wife-a few chunks of razor sharp glass in the bed and a few in her skivvys. crazy

Seriously,I've heard the argument about the mercury in them,and it sounds pretty scary until you remind the person telling it that they have a mouthful of mercury fillings in their teeth-then watch their eyes bulge out. grin

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Originally Posted By: skee0025
I refuse to use them in my house. Heres a little sample of what the Goverment recommends

Carefully pick up glass fragments and place them in a glass jar with metal lid (such as a canning jar) or in a sealed plastic bag.

Use sticky tape, such as duct tape, to pick up any remaining small glass fragments and powder.

If vacuuming is needed after all visible materials are removed, vacuum the area where the bulb was broken.

Remove the vacuum bag (or empty and wipe the canister), and put the bag or vacuum debris in a sealed plastic bag.

4. Clean-up Steps for Clothing, Bedding, etc.:

If clothing or bedding materials come in direct contact with broken glass or mercury-containing powder from inside the bulb that may stick to the fabric, the clothing or bedding should be thrown away. Do not wash such clothing or bedding because mercury fragments in the clothing may contaminate the machine and/or pollute sewage.

Uh,OK. I guess I'd follow those same guidelines if I broke a 4 foot flourescent light tube-how about an 8 footer? Sounds like common sense directions to me. I guess if you want a safe light bulb that lets you leave some shards of glass in your bed or undies-that's cool. That's always a big turn on for my wife-a few chunks of razor sharp glass in the bed and a few in her skivvys. crazy

Seriously,I've heard the argument about the mercury in them,and it sounds pretty scary until you remind the person telling it that they have a mouthful of mercury fillings in their teeth-then watch their eyes bulge out. grin

Excellent points, but there's no need to make fun of people in order to make those points.

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My wife really does not like that stuff.

I've never personally met anyone who likes glass shards in their undies. winksmilegrin

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Quote:
I've never personally met anyone who likes glass shards in their undies.

Lol,I resisted the urge,but I almost googled it. Sure as heck there's probably some site devoted to the joys of broken glass in your underpants.

What a world. crazy

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Quote:

Uh,OK. I guess I'd follow those same guidelines if I broke a 4 foot flourescent light tube-how about an 8 footer? Sounds like common sense directions to me. I guess if you want a safe light bulb that lets you leave some shards of glass in your bed or undies-that's cool. That's always a big turn on for my wife-a few chunks of razor sharp glass in the bed and a few in her skivvys. crazy

If you have 4 or 8 foot flourescent light tubes in you bedroom you need to do some serious remodeling. I just dont see the point in being forced to place items in my house that if/when they break one of the government suggested remedies is to hire a hazmat team or to throw out my belongings. All this so some brussel sprout eating tree huggers can feel good about themselves thinking they are "doing their part" to fix a non existant problem. These are also the same people that evacuate entire schools when a kid breaks a thermometer in class, yet somehow its perfectly ok to have in my kids bedroom.

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We're making the switch over to CFL bulbs in our house. One thing to watch for...if I remember right, these bulbs are not suitable for outside use...they can't handle the cold.

And if you are concerned about the dangers of breakage, don't use 'em in your bedrooms or kitchen. Entryways, bathrooms, unfinished basements, utility rooms...these are good places for CFL bulbs.

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We're making the switch over to CFL bulbs in our house.

It's the only way to go. I replaced 10 bulbs in my basement in-ceiling lighting about 2 years ago and have yet to have one burn out. The initial cost is nothing compared to the savings. I replaced 75 watt incandescent with 18 watt CFL's and over the life of these bulbs I'll save about $400 - $500.

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Been using them on a limited basis for years.

While they use less energy I've found they do not last long and not even close to what they claim. In fact I'll guess and say 25% of my lighting is with CFL but the majority of bulb replacement are CFL. Of coarse no one keeps track of when they replaced a light bulb, it goes out and you put a new one in. At some point something didn't seem right with those bulbs. So same fixture with standard light bulb and CF, guess which one burns out first?

I might be using less energy but its costing me a lot more in bulb replacement.

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Been using them on a limited basis for years.

While they use less energy I've found they do not last long and not even close to what they claim. In fact I'll guess and say 25% of my lighting is with CFL but the majority of bulb replacement are CFL. Of coarse no one keeps track of when they replaced a light bulb, it goes out and you put a new one in. At some point something didn't seem right with those bulbs. So same fixture with standard light bulb and CF, guess which one burns out first?

I might be using less energy but its costing me a lot more in bulb replacement.

Actually, Frank, I have kept track. As I mentioned earlier, I found out the hard way about using them in recessed cans. I actually went so far as to mark the installation date because I knew they weren't lasting longer than my incandescent bulbs. I was right. It was after then that I learned most CFLs are not rated for use in enclosed fixtures including recessed cans. You have to look for them but they are available.

At the same time I installed CFLs in my basement as well as other places over 10 years ago and haven't replaced one yet.

Someone mentioned that they are not any good outside. NOT TRUE! Again, you can find them rated for outdoor use. I have been using them in our pole barn and outbuildings for years. The ones I use are rated to start at temperatures down to -40 degrees F. Even those that are not rated for the low temperature have been working fine. They just take a little longer to get up to full brightness. Probably about 60 seconds or less.

As far as mercury goes, if my memory serves me correctly, the amount used would fit on the head of a stick pin. Conversely, thermometers used many times that amount and your home heating thermostat might contain as much as a teaspoon of mercury. Pop the cover off. If your thermostat is a mercury switch you'll see it in the glass tube. We probably ingest more mercury by eating fish from our local lakes or taking a drink from our tap.

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I agree with Frank and have had the same experience. What they claim for life expectancy is hogwash and a gimmick to get people to switch over...hoping that will ease people's mind when they look at the price tag.

I've noticed that the el-cheapo CFL's are absolute junk and worse than the more expensive Sylvanias and GE's as far as life expectancy goes, but after spending the extra for the better bulbs what are you really saving? Not to mention the light they give off is "fake" looking (yes I've tried the different color temperature bulbs), and then there's that little item of bringing a toxic chemical into the house. I believe the amount of Hg in a single CFL is enough to contaminate 1000 gallons of water.

Why isn't this thread in the "Equipment" forum?

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We have some CFL bulbs that are four years old and still going strong. And these are the cheapos. We don't keep track like Bob did, but we put these in several fixtures (non of them enclosed) when we bought our house four years ago and haven't needed to replace any of them.

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Same here Steve,we have a few in outdoor motion lights that are going on 5 years old and still work fine.

Maybe folks aren't getting them installed right. grin

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I don't know.....everybody I've talked to say they don't last just as Frank has mentioned.

Maybe someday affordable and practical LED lights for the home will be available and everyone will wonder why they fell for those gimmicky CFLs.

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The different bulbs have different electronic ballast components depending on the stated usage. Heat is the killer of electronics and the bulbs used in enclosed fixtures need higher grade components. Same for the cold starting ones. If you have spiky power to your home, you may notice them dying faster also. The ballasts don't like spikes anymore than any other electronic device.

CFLs are a short term solution anyway. Soon LED lighting will be cheap enough for mainstream. Then you'll be talking 3 watts for 75 equivilent.

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I don't like them to be honest. The color was bleh in the bedroom, and if you do the math, the savings are minimal.

I can say however that I switched over to them outside for the exterior of my garage (drive lights) and they have performed significantly better than incandescent bulbs for life and brightness.

I can confirm that the cold doesn't affect them as they work fine is sub-zero temps.

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Isn't the life cycle issue a question of how many times they are turned off and on? Hours of operation would be about impossible to keep track of. The CFL's probably are best used in applications where the light is going to stay on for at least 15 minutes. That's why we don't use them for isntance in a hallway or on stairs - you turn the light on when you enter to move through the area and off as you leave it.

I'd bet someone could do the Google and come up with some 'real' data rather than just off the cuff commentary.

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