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grizkid

why the change

16 posts in this topic

was out fishing this mon tues wed with very differing results. mon arrived at the lake 3 pm no fish until 6 had a upper 40s maybe 50 destroy the rear of my dawg no hooks though. so goes the night nothing now until sunset sunsets and 10 mins later mid 40s pounds the bait boatside good hookset 30 seconds later gone. 30mins later another strike boatside didn't see much of the fish as it is now dark but same thing about 30 secs and gone, next cast bam finally a 44 in the boat. On to another spot about 20 mins later another strike short battle and gone. so continue on and about 10 mins later a 42 manages to hit the boat. now fish tues morn and tues night nothing only seen 2 in 13 hrs wed same story 14 hrs and seen 3 what was the deal monday.

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NOt sure where you're fishing, but the change in weather has a lot to do with it. It has been a cool, cloudy, windy, and wet summer. The fish have been pretty active until this heat wave. The rapid increase in water temps have put many of the lakes in a funk, just as a severe drop would.

Just before a front/trend or severe barometric change fish will spike in their activity, then go into a lull during said trend. After a few days of stable weather they will slowly get active again.

During the slow times, make sure you pay attention to moon phases and weather patterns. If a system is moving near the area, there is your change. Wind shifts, pressure drops, and temperature fluctuations can make the dinner bell ring again. So pay close attention to the environment.

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IMO if you're talking about sugar lake, there is no explination. never fished a moodier more backwards lake in my life. i put hundreds of hours in on that lake the last two seasons and i'm glad i can fish different waters now. talk about a though nut.

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Welcome to muskie fishing {notice I didn't say catching}. grin

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There are a couple of us meteorologists on the forum and we will back up exactly what Jerry says. Even a subtle pressure or wind shift on an otherwise unremarkable day can give you a window of opportunity. Some keys I watch are the three hour pressure tendency, model forecasts of RH/Cloud cover, and not only the major fronts, but minor impulses that produce brief changes in wind direction. For instance, a week ago a minor upper level feature moved across northern MN and kicked the wind around to the south for three or four hours before switching back north. We put a 50 and 55 in the boat during that window. Weather information is now so freely available online that everyone can get the same stuff we do in the weather office. Take advantage of it. Jerry's the ultimate pro and can catch fish when most others can't. For me, I have to rely on a science background and being on the water at the right time and of course, the right place. Next time we do a musky weather seminar down here (this fall at the new Bass Pro opening here) I will post a note in case someone is really bored and wants to drive to Des Moines.

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This can happen on any lake, at any time, and Jerry and John already stated much more eloquently, and informatively what I'm sure a lot of people could only attempt to explain.

I came into this thread to tell you that you are not alone. Went out tonight from 7 to 10, didn't see a fish until 20 minutes or so after sunset, came in hot and bit twice on the figure 8, got hooks the first time, and finally stuck the second time. Boated that fish then kept moving, and moved 2 big fish in a 20 minute period, then everything shut down. Just the nature of the beast.

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griz - First, I'd have to agree with 50inchpig, if you on Sugar I got no answers for you. Its a tough lake. Makes me want to leave it for a month or two.

Second, like all the more knowledgeable people have mentioned it can be those certain instances that turn fish on. Had a trip early this year around a front, not major but some rain and a little wind. Contacted 7 fish within an hour and then it died. Just gotta be on the water when it happens.

John since your talking about wind you should chime into the other thread about wind. I'd be curious to see where you get accurate forecasts because most of mine haven't been too accurate.

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Next time we do a musky weather seminar down here (this fall at the new Bass Pro opening here) I will post a note in case someone is really bored and wants to drive to Des Moines.

John!

When is this going to happen so i can clear my schedule( I hope!)?

Please post this in the "IOWA" forum also! Thanks!

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Hey John, thanks for the ego boost. As for utilizing non fishing tools to be better on the water - I check the weather about 10 times a day. Also I check the barometer and moon phases. majors - minors, etc. On those tough days, you may only have a window that is open for a few minutes. When they open, hit those spots where you have seen fish or done well before.

I just got that SIrius weather station for my HDS 10. Haven't set it up yet, but it seems to be a pretty neat thing.

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1 reason I keep my Expedition on while fishing is to keep track of any barometer changes.

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thanks for the replies guys must have just hit it right before the streak of hot weather gonna hit it again next week try my luck again and FYI I was not on sugar. Sugar has been kickin my but this year as well.

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Under the wind question on the forum, I put a little graphic tip you can use from the NWS site. Pretty handy.

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I had the "change" happen at an inopportune time on Friday I think. I had had great action earlier in the week Tues/Wed from 6:30 on into the evening. Friday was just jacked up about a freaking great night upcoming, wind for a while from the S/SE, layed down a short time after we started fishing which was just after 6:15 and stayed calm. Distant lightning to the west and north of us. Fished till 10:15 when had to quit as had to work and needed to get off the water before bashed by huge storm (Lake Bemidji). Never saw a fish, no follows, not one swimming by, no tailouts, not even a pike, absolutely nothing. Sounds like fish went off earlier in the day, very late morning to around moonset 4ish pm and then just disappeared. Brother and some others nailed 3 fish in that time frame and lost another huge one. Just can't figure out exactly why the fish went hot and then shut down with the storms still roughly 6 hrs out? I saw plenty of other boats Friday night and never really saw anyone else really get into any "hot" figure 8's or anything either? Anyone got answers or reports on similar stuff from Friday?

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I was on lake Bemidji on Friday as well. Started fishing at about five wasn't getting much action. Went to the side of the lake the wind has been blowing into and started to fish the inside weed edge. I was casting shallow towards the deep over a cabbage bed with a WTD lure. From about 7:15 to 8:00 I was getting all sort of action. I lost a big one right at the boat. Only had her lip hook and she shake it off. That one really hurt. Biggest fish I ever seen in person and I should of had her. Oh well at least she's still down there. few more strikes and then it just stop. It seem that there was a feeding frenzy going on for about half hour. Kind of disapointing that I couldn't convert a fish in that window.

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