Guests - If You want access to member only forums on HSO. You will gain access only when you sign-in or Sign-Up on HotSpotOutdoors.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
bucketmouth64

canoe type

7 posts in this topic

Interested in a canoe, but I would like more info. about any advantages of non-aluminum canoes. Also, how do you know what length to buy? Is it just personal preference? Would like a durable and light canoe. Will be used for duck hunting, fishing, and canoe outings. Any info. would be helpful in the decision making process.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have owned an Alumacraft 15CL for about 5 years. I have asked a few people about what is appealing about Kevlar canoes too. They say they flex when you scrape rocks and such allowing a more streamlined float. They can be a few pounds lighter too.

I would say that I feel much more comfortable mounting a trolling motor bracket to metal when clamping it down tight. You can drill thru aluminum anywhere for rigging the canoe which I have found extremely useful. I have mounted rope and cleats for anchoring, rod holder mounts (nice for trolling in BWCA), and a 6 slot rod saver (for portaging). I don't think these would be possibilities with a Kevlar or fiberglass canoe.

Also, mine still only weighs 55 lbs. Next drilling mission: portage shoulder pads!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kevlar canoes are nice because they are a bit lighter. Me and my dad made 2 wood strip canoes with another father/son and they are amazing. But in all honesty if you are not going to get too involved into canoeing, aluminum is the way to go.

They can take just about anything you throw at them, and like Miner said they are much easier to drill into if the need arises.

another thing i have found is that aluminum canoes seem to be a little bit more stable which would be ideal for duck hunting.

My advice would be to go out and paddle a few different types of canoes in several different lengths and beam widths to see what you like best. in the end it all comes down to personal preference

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are lots of different non-alum options. There are a couple different plastic options, fiberglass, royalex and kevlar. Not all kevlar is flexible. It all depends on what material is used to hold the kevlar together. Most kevlars are actually pretty rigid which is how they got a bad rep for being brittle in canoe country. They could pop holes by hitting sharp rocks. Some companies have used a more flexible material and the boats can flex a little more without breaking.

Choosing a length is based on how you plan to use it and how you paddle. The longer a boat is, the easier it is to paddle straight. Shorter boats are more maneuverable but less efficient with paddling. 15-16ft is in the middle. Short boats are good for rivers and moving around alot. Longer boats like open water and handle waves better and also provide more room for gear.

Also, the material a canoe is made of does not mean anything about how stable they are. In fact, flexible boats can be more unstable if they flex too much. Having a stable boat has a flatter bottom. A lot of racing-inspired boats are really narrow to go fast and they can be very tippy. Many of the canoe companies went for this design because it made the boats faster, but they can be difficult to balance and keep steady. I don't like them. Find a boat that feels good to you.

I have two canoes, one is a Coleman RamX 15' plastic (polystyrene) and the other is a Souris River Quetico 17 Kevlar. They serve totally different purposes, but both could be used for everything.

My plastic 15' boat weighs ~80lbs. My kevlar 17' boat weighs 42lbs. I get more room, more capacity, more efficiency with half the weight and no sacrifice in durability or capacity.

I like my boats cause they are wide and stable. I can fish or hunt out of them. I can load them down with weight and still bring my dog. I can carry both, but I can do the kevlar much easier. Also, if I drop something in the boat it only makes a "thud" instead of the ringing of an aluminum.

If I were you I'd be looking for something made of royalex in a 16ft size. Its about the best all-around canoe you can find. Try out as many as you can to find a hull design you like and are comfortable with.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I were you I'd be looking for something made of royalex in a 16ft size. Its about the best all-around canoe you can find. Try out as many as you can to find a hull design you like and are comfortable with.

_________________________Totally agree. Plastic blows aluminum away. You do need to go the Royalex route to keep the weight down however. Pretty much any drilling, mounting, etc...you can do in aluminum you can do in plastic, without the noise of aluminum.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I looked at the river rogue 14 at GM. It is pretty wide in the middle for gear. Anyone have personal experience with this canoe?

Where can I find aluminum canoes in the North Metro area? Tried to look at some websites with no luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are you looking for a new aluminum canoe? If so, I got my last one at Hallberg Marine in Wyoming. I forget the name of the place but there was a boat dealer in White Bear Lake on 61 that also sold aluminum canoes. If you're looking for used, you might try calling some rental places to see what they may have for sale.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0