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Carp-fisher

7" max size for "minnows"?

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So the law is now that you can't have any baitfish over 7" in length in possession, including bullheads. This probably isn't a big deal for most people, but for catfishermen, this law sucks. A 2 lb catfish can swallow a 7" bullhead. Why was this regulation implemented?

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So the law is now that you can't have any baitfish over 7" in length in possession, including bullheads. This probably isn't a big deal for most people, but for catfishermen, this law sucks. A 2 lb catfish can swallow a 7" bullhead. Why was this regulation implemented?

Your statement is not correct. See the definition of minnows on page 3, 2009 minnesota Fishing Regulations. Suckers not over 12 inches long are classified as minnows and legal as bait. Also, there is action pending by the MN DNR to amend the rule on bullheads to allow them to be used up to 10 inches in length.

Your question as to why it was implemented - think about it. This is a method to control the spread of unwanted rough fish from one body to water to another. For some fishermen, cat fishermen, this is an inconvenience but the rule has helped control the spread of invasive species of fish.

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Yep page 3 of the 2009 reg's:

Quote:
Minnows–

Members of the minnow family, except carp and goldfish; bullheads,

ciscoes, lake whitefish, goldeyes, and mooneyes (not over 7 inches

long); suckers (not over 12 inches long); mud minnows, leeches, tadpole

madtoms and stonecats. (Note: border water regulations may vary.)

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...This is a method to control the spread of unwanted rough fish from one body to water to another....

If that was really the case, wouldn't they all be banned and not just the larger ones?

Their must be another reason.

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If that was really the case, wouldn't they all be banned and not just the larger ones?

Their must be another reason.

You are looking for a one size fits all answer to the issue. Taking minnows is bigger than just invasive species it also has to do with controling how we take bait. They impose restrictions on traps, seines, nets to keep us from harvesting game fish along with the minnows. These restrictions keep us from harvesting bait from deeper water and taking young game fish at the same time we harvest minnows.

This size thing about minnows is just one piece of the fish management puzzle. There is no way they are going to ban all minnows, it would impact all fishermen. Most fisherman don't harvest bait and those of us that do are a small minority so the regulations and the rules slide in under the radar but they still provide controls and help slow the spread of invasive species. Each year they add more controls and more rules and most fishermen don't see or feel the impact.

Look at the bait harvest rules and you can see how they have put together a system of controls that supports reducing the spread of invasive species and lessen the impact of bait harvest on fish management. You ban the size of certain minnows which are a rough fish and by themselves could be considered an invasive species and you take a bite out of the apple. Next you make rules that place controls on how to take bait (size of traps, length of seines, closed season on taking of baits, etc). Next you start restricting what waters you can harvest bait from and you actually close the taking of bait from other waters (I bet you didn't know that it was illegal to harvest bait from the St Croix River but it is, because it is infested with zebra mussels).

One day (like today) a couple of you wake up and say "How come they restrict the size of minnows and what is their reasoning for that?" You guys are a day late and a dollar short. This rules and regulations ship sailed a long time ago and it is only going to get tougher in the future. Each year the DNR adds to and further restrict waters we can harvest bait from and they add additional regulations to restrict how we can harvest bait.

I study the rules and I try to keep up with how and where it is legal to take bait. It gets tougher each year as the waters are closed or restricted and it gets harder to find legal locations that hold bait that is legal to harvest. I'm more careful about who I tell where I harvest bait than I am about a few of my favorite flathead spots.

So you want a reason for a size limit to bait - the answer is because they said so.

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