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DRH1175

What size pipe for my irrigations system?

7 posts in this topic

Can I use 1" for my mainlines and laterals or do I need to use 3/4" for the laterals. Also is everyone using line drains or is the winter blowout enough?

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If you doing a residential system, you can use 1" for everything if you wanted to. It is easier to just buy the 1" fittings rather than try to mix and match.

You can get the yellow saddle T's that clamp onto the pipe instead of cutting and having a T joint, and then use the 1/2" tubing to run over to each head. The flex tube (1/2") is nice to run to each head rather than having the head attached to the 1" pipe with elbow because if it gets hit or driven on it wont break the fitting it will just flex and you can dig it out and straighten it up with out fixing a joint. Generally the heads that are attached right to the 1" pipe with elbow and extension break off when driven on or caught with a mower or something in soft ground.

I dont see a need for a drain, just install the clean out so you can blow it out in the fall.

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Well under a reconmendation of an installer I will be using 1 1/4" for mainlines and 1" for Laterals. I have another question what is the difference between 100psi and 100psi nsf?

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Is nsf stronger or will it last longer than non nsf? Non nsf is about half the price of nsf.

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i believe so. the nsf may be a standard rating more than a drinkgin water approval stamp. google it and see what it says. i wouldnt chince on anything that you plan on burying and dont want to dig up. finding underground leaks is a pain in the you know what

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Quote:
Today, plastic plumbing products designed for potable water applications are usually designated with either "NSF-PW" or "NSF-61" to indicate that the product complies with the health effects requirements of NSF/ANSI Standard 61 for materials designed for contact with potable water. This standard also establishes similar guidelines for other plumbing materials, including copper tubing. If your pipe is not coded with one of these designations or if it is designated with an alternative code such "NSF-DWV," it is probably not meant for potable water applications and should not be used for such purposes.

The NSF Mark can be found on millions of consumer, commercial, and industrial products today. Products evaluated and certified by NSF International include bottled water, food equipment, home water treatment products, home appliances, plumbing and faucets, and even pool and spa components.

NSF is the company that certifies the pipe as safe for potable water. The individual companies that manufacture the pipe determine the strength of the pipe based on what they use to make it and how dense the ply is.

I know the pipe you get at Menards is a thinner pipe than you get at a commercial supplier.

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