Guests - If You want access to member only forums on HSO. You will gain access only when you sign-in or Sign-Up on HotSpotOutdoors.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Scoot

new tool for hunting in MN

102 posts in this topic

Just wanted to let you guys know I tried out a new product this weekend called MNTRAX. I had heard how great it was in ND (NDTRAX), so thought I would give the Minnesota version a try. It is advertised as being an all-around sportsman GPS map for Garmin and Lowrance. I bought it primarily for two reasons: to find any and all public land that I could hunt in MN and because the topo info I had for White Earth Lake (where my mo-in-law has a little cabin) was not too great. ... and I just got a new Garmin so thought I would try it out.

The WMAs and WPAs were spot on and looked good as well as other public lands. I had no idea I went past so much public land on the way to the lake. Unfortunately I didn't end up bringing the boat, so I couldn't check out the topo info for the lake. Assuming the lake contours are as good as the land/hunting info, this is going to be sweet!

Just thought I'd give you hunters a heads up- this little tool will make finding land and the boundaries between private and public land in MN really easy!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This may finally convince me to upgrade the old Garmin GPS72. smirk Need one that can take cards.

Thanks for the report!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So this has all public lands AND lake maps to boot? Sweet!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah Jameson, the 72 is old school!!! Time to upgrade!

DonBo- yes, it has both lake topo and all public lands. It also has highways and county roads, hiking trails, boat ramps, parks, and a bunch of other things. I talked with the guy who sells it and he also said that I could get (at no extra cost) PLSS (PLAT) information if I wanted it. I'm not sure I would need that level of detail, but I'm sure some guys would love it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't we already have this on our LM chips? Or is this something new?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

MNTRAX is something new. It is differant from lm but does have 1100+ lakemaps on it.

Th MNTRAX has topo available on a ton of lakes, but that's not why I posted it here-- I posted it because it's got all of the public lands marked in the state. I posted it here (hunting forum) because I think it'll be a great deal for anyone who wants to hunt on public land and know that they are on public land. Like I said in my original post- there's a ton of land I can hunt between my place and my mo-in-law's place in MN that I didn't even know was public land. Also, when I'm out chasing grouse I'll know where the state land ends and where the private land begins, so I can stay off private property. I think it'll be a great little tool for hunters.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So what is the cost of your new gadget? Is it still reasonable?

Fish

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wonder if it would update as land changes?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So what is the cost of your new gadget? Is it still reasonable?

Fish

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My LakeMaster chip gives me all the public hunting land in MN. I've been using it for that purpose for the last two years. Could it be the older versions of the LakeMaster chip don't do that?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My LakeMaster chip gives me all the public hunting land in MN.

That's not true.

I hadn't heard about LakeMaster having any hunting data so I contacted them and they indicated there is a limited amount of land information including WMA and some forest information shown on only the Minnesota chip and not sure of what year or version of the chip you would need. From what they indicated it doesn't sound nearly as in-depth or include all of the information MNTRAX does.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the info Scoot. This looks like something I would use, I will check it out!

Thanks smile

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Scoot I am getting one of those what a great addition.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dang too bad I don't have a card slot on my 76 cs. This would be helpful.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do get some public land on my lakemaster chip, but I know not all the WMAS aren't on there.

I'll have to check this out cause I use my GPS primarily for hunting so this would be a great investment for me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

got mine in the mail today. now im bummed cause it wont work in my I-finder plus the old one black and white version. witch stinks cuz I wanted to play with it tonite. dang now I have to buy a new GPS.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

b-b, nothing wrong with an excuse to buy a new toy, right? wink

However, I'm pretty sure it will work with your I-finder. I've got a buddy who has (I think) the same gps as you and he had the same experience- he didn't think it worked. However, he updated his firmware and it worked fine for him. Also, make sure your map setting is for Lowrance, not Navionics (might want to try this first).

If these things don't work, outdoorprostore- customer service has been excellent for me and I'm sure they'll take good care of you.

An example of this happened last week- I broke the little MNTRAX micro SD card in half while trying to put it in the case. This was due to me not paying attention and stupidly trying to force the case shut (D-U-M). They replaced the broken chip with no questions asked.

Point is, they'll take care of you if you can't make it work in your unit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thanks scoot i will try it again and if I cant figure it out i will give them a call

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

FYI- I've taken this little gem with me from Fargo to the Twin Cities, Fargo to White Earth Lake, and Fargo to LOW. So far, I have yet to find a place where the public/private land boundaries didn't match up really nicely. I got both the MNTRAX chip and the NDTRAX chip. I'm headed to Western ND in a week or so and I'm looking forward to using it there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So which GPS model would you recommend for this card? I have an old GPS (no card slots, blk & wht, etc) and was thinking of upgrading this fall. This chip sounds like it would be great and fit my all needs. Is there a Make/Model that would be recommended or most commonly used? I would want a hand held unit for fishing and hunting. Thanks in advance for your opinions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

definitely couldn't hurt. always helpful to know exactly who's land you are on at a given time!

cool

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So which GPS model would you recommend for this card? I have an old GPS (no card slots, blk & wht, etc) and was thinking of upgrading this fall. This chip sounds like it would be great and fit my all needs. Is there a Make/Model that would be recommended or most commonly used? I would want a hand held unit for fishing and hunting. Thanks in advance for your opinions.

gurkster, no right or wrong answer to this. I just upgraded my gps and I got a Garmin 60CSX. The Oregon looks pretty cool, but it's pricey and I got a good buy on the 60CSX. However, any newer gps that takes SD or micro SD cards should work with this product (as I understand it).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I finally had a chance to give this MNTRAX chip on my Lowrance Expedition C. It is a sweet little tool, when you are looking for public lands in areas that you aren't that familiar with. I am located in east-central Minnesota and my hunting takes my all over the state, but I think I am especially going to enjoy it during pheasant season.

Thanks for the tip Scoot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Does the chip outline county land too? I hunt areas where state and federal forests border county land. Our hunting party has always wondered where these lines are. This definately sounds like a must have. If it had the land topo'd like the lakes it would be the ultimate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0



  • Posts

    • I guess the one positive regarding this Carrier deal is at least, of what I've seen from watching some of them, the press starting to question government involvement in  private enterprise and cronyism.   It only took them eight years but better late than never, I guess.
    • They're made by NGP, an industrial producer in Ningbo, China. Good luck getting service or parts on that, is all I'll say. I know all the other augers engines, etc, are made in China, but they also have been around for years with an established company, which is a huge difference. I'd be real cautious...
    • I use 100 pound power pro braid never had any issues with it.
    • I've been looking into them.   I believe 33 is a typo.
    • Old fashioned black Dacron musky line. Durable tough  Have thought of trying  50 or 100lb flouro but knots are hard to do in it then you have to use crimps etc more point to fail. Interested to see what others do.   Mwal
    • I kinda wish Parise would have opted for the surgery this offseason and miss the first month or so, rather than to rehab it.  Its starting to show.
    • Here is good overview article that might be interesting...   https://www.dgif.virginia.gov/wildlife/diseases/cwd/science-behind-cwd-management/   The Science Behind CWD Management Why Manage CWD? Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) has the potential to negatively impact deer herds wherever the disease occurs. CWD is always fatal and while there have only been 13 cases detected in Virginia, as of February 2016, CWD could have serious negative impacts on the state’s deer population if it became established and widely prevalent (Almberg et al. 2011). CWD infection decreases deer survival odds and lowers total life expectancy (Miller et al. 2008). If a large percentage of the population were to become infected there could be negative impacts for the population, including: A decline in doe survival, which results in an overall reduced population (Gross and Miller 2001); Fewer older bucks, as male animals are more likely to be infected due to specific male social and behavioral tendencies (Miller et al. 2008, Jennelle et al. 2014); and An overall decline in population (Gross and Miller 2001, Almberg et al. 2011), as exhibited in Colorado. In the area of Colorado with highest CWD prevalence, mule deer numbers have plummeted by 45%, in spite of good habitat and protection from human hunting (Miller et al. 2008). DGIF is concerned about the impact CWD could have on Virginia’s deer herd; once CWD has become well established in an area, its persistence in the environment makes eradication extremely difficult, if not impossible. Taking action to keep the percentage of infected animals low helps to prevent (or at least slow) the spread of CWD to new areas, and also helps to slow the transmission of the disease between individuals. Understanding the Spread of CWD CWD prions, which are the infectious proteins that cause the disease, are found in saliva, urine, feces, and blood (Mathiason et al. 2006, Mathiason et al. 2009). They can persist for years outside the body, in soil and in other substances, and can be transmitted by animals that are not yet showing symptoms of the disease (Miller et al. 2004, Mathiason et al. 2009). Halting or slowing the spread of CWD is therefore a matter of reducing transmission between deer and making deer less likely to pick up prions from the environment (Mathiason et al. 2009, Grear et al. 2010, Storm et al. 2013). Differences in behavior make tracking the spread of CWD different between does and bucks and between younger and older adults. Bucks are more likely to become infected, for reasons that are not well understood (Grear et al. 2006, Miller et al. 2008, Jennelle et al. 2014). Higher CWD prevalence is found in older age classes of bucks (Grear et al 2006). Adult bucks make long excursions outside their home range, bringing them into contact with a wider area and more individual deer (Karns 2011). Young bucks are more likely to disperse from their mother’s home range and can cover many kilometers, thereby potentially spreading the disease across the landscape (McCoy et al. 2005). Young bucks infected with CWD may not be indicative of established CWD presence at the location they were killed because the buck may have been traveling. Does are relatively sedentary, usually spending their lives near their place of birth and with a related social group. Does only rarely make excursions (Kolodzinski et al. 2009, Miller et al. 2010, Grear et al. 2010). Locations where infected does are found are likely to be a source of further infected deer (Grear et al. 2010, Magel et al. 2013). An infected doe suggests that CWD is established in the population where that doe was killed (Grear et al. 2010, Magel et al. 2013). Of Virginia’s thirteen infected deer (as of February 2016), just four were does. Of the nine infected bucks, seven were harvested within just a few miles of the does, suggesting a small cluster of infection. The last two bucks were killed several miles from the cluster. The fact that these two outliers were young bucks makes it likely, though not certain, that these individuals were on the move, dispersing from their birth places. Managing CWD Due to the nature of the prions which cause CWD (please see the What Are Prions page for more information), treatment of diseased animals is not an option. Research suggests that there is some hope of managing CWD, and that the best methods available are: Decreasing transmission opportunity by:Lowering the density of the deer population A lower density population surrounding a location of known infection reduces the chances of deer picking up CWD prions from the environment, or from each other. Research indicates that indirect transmission is just as important as animal-to-animal transmission (Storm et al. 2013). Population reduction could reduce contacts between infected and susceptible individuals and consequently reduce the disease transmission rate. Analysis of spatial data indicates that CWD is clustered on the landscape, from which one could infer that deer near CWD-positive deer are more likely to be infected (Joly et al. 2003.) Earn-a-Buck, currently in effect in Frederick, Warren, and Clarke Counties (the cluster of infected deer is located in Frederick County), is designed to reduce the overall deer population by focusing more hunting pressure on the female segment of the population. Banning feeding or baiting of deer in areas with CWD CWD prions can be found in saliva (Mathiason et al. 2009), and feed or bait piles are excellent modalities to transfer saliva between deer. Feed and bite piles also artificially congregate deer, thereby facilitating transmission through urine and feces. Prevent the introduction of CWD prions into new areas: VDGIF prohibits the movement of deer carcasses out of the CWD Containment Area until after they have been processed according to guidelines described in Transporting Carcasses Within and Out of the Containment Area. VDGIF prohibits the transport of carcasses from states/provinces listed as CWD Carcass Restriction Zones into Virginia unless they have already been processed according to these guidelines. VDGIF prohibits the possession and use of attractants made from real deer urine or other natural body fluids from deer while afield. CWD prions may be found in the urine of infected deer even if the deer is not showing symptoms (John et al. 2013). There is no live animal test for CWD that is approved by the USDA, therefore deer farms producing and bottling urine cannot guarantee that they are collecting urine from healthy animals. There is no economically viable way to test urine for CWD after collection. Doing nothing to manage CWD is not a satisfactory option, as shown by a number of studies that have examined hunters’ attitudes toward current and potential strategies for managing CWD (Vaske 2010). Among hunters in most states and studies, (a) testing harvested animals for CWD and using hunters to reduce herds in CWD areas were acceptable strategies, (b) agencies taking no action and allowing CWD to take its natural course were considered unacceptable, and (c) using agency staff to reduce herds in CWD areas was controversial. Hunters also generally supported efforts to minimize spread of CWD and eliminate the disease from animal herds (Vaske 2010). A VDGIF survey conducted following the discovery of CWD in Frederick County in 2009 concluded that respondents supported five of seven potential strategies to control CWD in affected areas, including mandatory disease testing of hunter-killed deer, deer feeding prohibitions, deer carcass movement restrictions, restrictions on deer rehabilitation, and reduction of deer populations using hunters (VDGIF 2010, unpublished data). Respondents did not support the use of sharpshooting to reduce localized deer populations (42% opposed, 36% supported, 22% were neutral), but the strongest opposition was recorded for the option that described a complete lack of effort or attempt to manage CWD (79 % opposed, 8% supported).   (the references are at the link and appear to all be from various scientific type journals)
    • The recount effort underway in Wisconsin is turning out to have some disappointing results for former Green Party nominee Jill Stein and former Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton. By the end of the fifth day, and after more than 1 million votes were recounted, Trump grew his lead by just over two dozen votes.     Meanwhile in Pennsylvania, Clinton has only gained five votes after the state’s two largest counties completed their recount.     
    • It turns out that there haven't been many studies of long term impact of cwd, that I could find.    Here is a write up about one of them, from Wyoming.    http://www.wyofile.com/study-chronic-wasting-disease-kills-19-deer-annually/ and this one... http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0161127 Chronic Wasting Disease Drives Population Decline of White-Tailed Deer David R. Edmunds , Matthew J. Kauffman, Brant A. Schumaker, Frederick G. Lindzey, Walter E. Cook, Terry J. Kreeger, Ronald G. Grogan, Todd E. Cornish      
    • I use a thin super-line/braid. That said,  a friend of mine swears by mono in really clear water and I've sat with him and seen a lot of wary fish that still get close enough to ruin their day. Not sure if it matters or not... I just like the assurance of braid.
  • Our Sponsors