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lindy rig

basement ceiling access

9 posts in this topic

I'd like to get access to my basement ceiling for some plumbing. Bought the house a few years ago and can't seem to figure out how to get past these ceiling tiles without tearing them down and ruining them.

They feel somewhat loose (you can move them around a little) but also seem very close to the floor joices above and so I cannot tip them sideways enough to get them out.

Any ideas?

basementceiling.jpg

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That might be the system that attached directly to the joists. I installed that type in my basement. Is the support system made of vinyl? If so, the cross brackets will tip out of the way and the tile will pull out.

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Just try lifting them slightly and moving them off to the side, on top of the neighboring tile. Then there is no twisting or chance of damage.

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Rangerguy is correct but for the occasional piece of wire that will be used to hold the supports in place. Nudge one tile up and see if you can move it out of the way, but do it gently. Once you get one out you probably can figure out how the system is held in place and work your way around it.

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Just try lifting them slightly and moving them off to the side, on top of the neighboring tile. Then there is no twisting or chance of damage.

This will not work if it is the type I'm referring to.

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There isn't much wiggle room at all. Yes, looks like they are made out of vinyl.

Still not sure how to do it though?

Dtro - Is it the smaller cut pieces of vinyl I should try to swing out of the way to then tip the tiles? I can kind of get a few to move (bend) but then the tiles are still encased by the other sides and still don't see how to get them out without busting stuff?

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It's called CeilingMax:

3. How do I remove a tile once the ceiling is installed?

To remove a tile once the ceiling grid is installed, you will first need to unsnap a runner on one side of the tile. To unsnap the runner, you will need to start at the end of the runner and pull down. The runner will pull away from the top hanger, similar to a zip-lock bag. When you have the runner unsnapped, you will then be able to rock the cross tees and remove the tile(s). After you have the runner removed, you could also back out the screw in the top hanger near the tile you would like to remove. This would allow you to twist and flex the top hanger to get the cross tee and tile out. After your work behind the tile is complete, (screw the top hanger back into place if the screw was removed), slide the tile back into place, once again rocking the cross tees, and snap the runner back into the top hanger.

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Nice! Thanks man!

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It's called CeilingMax:

3. How do I remove a tile once the ceiling is installed?

To remove a tile once the ceiling grid is installed, you will first need to unsnap a runner on one side of the tile. To unsnap the runner, you will need to start at the end of the runner and pull down. The runner will pull away from the top hanger, similar to a zip-lock bag. When you have the runner unsnapped, you will then be able to rock the cross tees and remove the tile(s). After you have the runner removed, you could also back out the screw in the top hanger near the tile you would like to remove. This would allow you to twist and flex the top hanger to get the cross tee and tile out. After your work behind the tile is complete, (screw the top hanger back into place if the screw was removed), slide the tile back into place, once again rocking the cross tees, and snap the runner back into the top hanger.

I put this in my bathroom in the basement as it gives you more headroom in your basement. Dtro is correct on it. You have to take the runners off and then put them back in. Not as easy as suspended ceilings, but you get more standing room.

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