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Maasta

Jump Starting my boat with trolling batteries

15 posts in this topic

Ive got 3 batteries - 1 for the motor, 2 in line for a 24v Trolling motor. If needed, is there any issue using one of the trolling batteries to jump my motor battery? Do I need to disconnect the two trolling batteries first or does it matter?

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Maasta, There'd be nothing wrong using 1 (one) trolling motor battery to jump start your OB. However, Be VERY careful that your polarity is correctly identified (pos-pos,neg-neg)BEFORE you make ANY connections. 2 reasons jump to mind immediately: 1)Batteries can and do explode! Either due to reversed polarity and/ or voltage mis-match. 2)If your polarity is wrong, your stator and/or diodes on the OB can, and usually do short out (not a cheap fix!) Even if it's only connected long enough to make A spark! If you do jump, err on the side of caution! Be careful! Phred52

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I would disconnect them and then jump it. I have had to remove my trolling battery before to bring it to the back to start my boat once or twice before, not for a few years but using jumper cables... I would make sure I am only sending 12V. JMO.

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Yea, I've had to do it before. Disconnect so they aren't running at 24 volts and then run your motor to just one.

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Straight deep cycle batteries (not dual purpose) msy not start a large motor. They have high internal impedance which drops a lot of voltage with the very high current draw of a starting motor. If your lucky it may turn over. I have been in two boats where it did not.

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I have the same setup you have.... and I have had my main battery die while on the lake... so I disconnected one of my trolling batteries and replaced the main battery with it. It did the trick.... but if my trolling motor batteries were low it may have had trouble turning over.

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Straight deep cycle batteries (not dual purpose) msy not start a large motor. They have high internal impedance which drops a lot of voltage with the very high current draw of a starting motor. If your lucky it may turn over. I have been in two boats where it did not.

One way this may work anyway is to connect the batteries and wait a while before trying to start the outboard. You can use one battery to recharge another. Once your starting battery has had time to pick up some charge it can do most of the work.

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I have used my deep cycle trolling motor battery numerous times to start the outboard. It worked just fine.

I have only used the trolling motor battery when I ran something too long without starting the outboard.

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They often can handle it but it's hard on deep-cycle batteries to use them for high current loads just like it's hard on starting batteries to use them for low current loads.

Starting batteries are designed and most suited to short-term high-current loads with quick recharge. Deep-cycle batteries are designed and most suited to long-term low-current loads with moderate to slow recharge. To use them any other way deteriorates their life span so to get the most from your batteries use them for their intended purpose.

Dual-purpose batteries offer a somewhat middle-of-the-road approach by having some capabilities to handle both extremes moderately well but the overall life expectancy of dual purpose batteries will not compete with using the right battery type for the situation.

If you want the best bang for your buck and the best all-around performance you're still better off using deep-cycle batteries for electric trolling motors, lights, etc. and use starting batteries for starting the outboard.

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bob t has it right on i have a bigger motor and carry jumper cables in my boat and have had to use my jumper cables twice to help start my motor when the voltage falls to low to start my big motor and have both time hooked up the cables from one of my trolling batteries to my starting motor and waited 5 minutes and both times my motor started..only problem is that it get motor running enough to get me back in but i still cant go full throttle to get in as volts in the battery still arent high enough to let me motor go over 3500 rpms and i cant use tilt and trim but i can get in and charge battery up for the next days fishing..

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I agree with you gys, but in an emergency it would be fine to get you back to shore.

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I made a set of jumper cables that plug right into the transom trolling motor outlet on my boat, only had to use them once, worked great.

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I have never jump started a battery in the boat, but if one dies I have pulled one from the trolling motor to start the boat.

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I carry a "jumper pack" that can be used to jump start the boat or the truck if you left your light on while fishing it also has a light on it and a dc outlet there around $50-$100 and some have an air compressor built in

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Some guys run a dedicated "Jump Circuit" to/from there trolling motor battery...just in case.

This can serve a couple of proposes when rigged to a Perco multi battery switch. You can flip it over and allow the alternator to charge the trolling motors up when trolling or running with the main motor...or use the trolling motor battery to jump the starting battery or stabilize it if low.

You need to be sure your running 12 V when hooking into a 24 V or 36 V pack....just hook it to the section that reads 12 V and it will pull or charge from that point depending on demand. They do not run it in the on position all the time, just as needed. You can set your battery alarm on most modern sonars to tell you if the voltage is getting low, and react before it's "D'OH" time. Most sonars wind up hooked to the starting battery line and hence the drain that often catch's up to us on the water.

They run heavy gauge wire, like duel welding cable or jumper cable wire and install a 60 amp breaker to protect both ends if something would backfire.

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