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Choco Taco

Milfoil jig help

23 posts in this topic

Fellas,

New to fishing this heavy milfoil stuff on Tonka. I bought a bunch of heavier jigs but trying to figure out what to do. Do you guys pitch these things in deeper water? Inside weedline? Outside weedline? Do you cast them a short or long distance? I am not used to playing around this stuff. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.

-CT

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All of the above. smile Jigs work great in deeper water as well as shallow. As far as pitching, you'll wanna find small pockets in the milfoil and just drop it in, wiggle it up and down a few times and move to the next one. Just make sure you're using some pretty heavy gear for this, since you basically have to lift anything you get outta that milfoil, or it's gone!

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Choco, make sure you bring some patience with! The most frustrating thing about flippin into the pockets is that you can go a LONG time without getting a fish, then you will hit the motherload.

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Last night fished outside weed edge with 3/8th oz brown / orange jig tipped with a green pumkin berkley chigger craw. Had my 4yo son and 5 year old daughter with... It was slow going for the most part but I did hook into three nice ones - a 19.25 incher, and two 18's. All came out of fairly thick cabbage in 7-9 fow. I just flipped into pockets and watched line, popped it up a few times then moved to next pocket.... I'd say I spent a good two hours with that approach but did end up with about 10-11 lbs with those three fish. Kids love just seeing those big bass. Took some pics with the camera phone with kids and let them swim. I'd agree that you do have to have some patients with the jig but I will also say that it simply works and often times if you are patient it will pay off with a nice bag of fish. I think the main problem with people new to jigging for bass is they aren't confident in the approach and have little patientce with it / hence the switch to something else and the jigg confidence never gets established. I suggest just forcing yourself to fish with the jig until you have success. That is basically what I did a couple summers ago and I'm very glad I did as it is one of my most often used techniques now.

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I've fooled around with flipping a little, but not long enough to catch a fish. For beginners, is it easier to open the spool up and use a heavy jig? I've tried it a couple times with a swim jig, but had trouble getting distance on the flip.

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I like using a jig that has more of a bullet head shape instead of one that is more rounded... I also prefer to fish the milfoil vertical instead of horizontal, which means short accurate casts and pitches/flips... smile

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Instead of pitchin in pockets does anyone pitch the the thick matted up foil? I mean like there's a thick nasty clump and you cast right on it hoping to have enough weight to bust through?

Saw that on a bassmasters show last year. I haven't really tried it. I need heavier jigs or heavier bullet weights.

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Thanks for all the replies. I seem to give up on jigs to early because I am not used to the feel of the bite. Several times, I got a fish but it felt like a snag so my confidence on detecting a strike is low when it comes to jigs. I figure to go out only one day with jigs and leave all my other lures at home. That will force me to learn jigs.

So, here are my newbie questions. When you guys look for pockets in the weeds, are you looking at what's on the surface or below the surface? I assume both. I have a hard time spotting those pockets. Second, when do you decide to swim, pop, or drag a jig? Again, thanks for helping me out.

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Look for the pockets in the top of the weeds. The pocket is there because of whats on the bottom. Be it a rock, wood, or just a harder spot in the bottom where the weeds aren't growing. The pockets may only be the size of a basketball, but thats all they need. I usually let the fish tell me how they want it. Usually its a couple hops a brief pause, then onto the next hole. If they are there they will eat it. There have been times where they want it slower, but you have to know they are there in order to do that or you would be using up a lot of time. No need to swim or drag it when fishing in the foil, it will just get hung up in it. Like Tonka said, stay as vertical as you can, it will make your life a lot easier...

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Thanks for all the replies. I seem to give up on jigs to early because I am not used to the feel of the bite.

As far as the feel of the bite; You may feel a light tap, a noticable bump, or you may just see you line twitch or move slightly one way or another. There is no real science to feeling the bite as it varies from fish to fish. You can only concentrate and focus on your line and the feel of the rod and jig in your hand. Typically anthing that varies from the norm signifies a potential fish. Remember; Hook sets are free.

With no stretch line and an above average Rod you should feel at the very least a tap or a bump unless you have a lot of slack in your line. Also, excess Wind will hamper your sensitivity greatly. Good luck.

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And don't forget, go easy on the hookset! Since they're usually 10-15ft away and there's no stretch in the line, I can't count how many bass I've broken off on a jig cuz I set the hook too hard.

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i have broken rods doing that to with braid just have to wach your self

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Ok, so I tried jigging a little bit today. Tried the outside weedline in about 15-17 fow and tried some holes in the milfoil in about 10-12 fow. No takers. I flipped the jig about 5-10 ft away from the boat and popped it some, shook my rod tip, and dragged it back a little. Used a 1/2 oz jig with a craw trailer. Any tips on what I should do better next time? Thx.

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Has anyone tried dropshoting in the milfoil pockets? I thought I might try that this year to see how that works.

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yes sir.. can work quite well at times.. but go with a regular flipping stick not your typical drop shot rod set up.

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I'd have to respectfully disagree fishahaulick. I drill my hooksets just about as hard as I can in attempting to get the heavier gauge hook to bury itself into the thick upper (roof) of the bass's mouth. I've never broke off nor have I ever busted a rod. Again, I use med/heavy bait casting rods coupled with 30 - 50 lb Power pro often times directly tied with a back to back uni knot to 20 lb flourocarbon. I have though lost fish because I thought I had a bite and did a half [PoorWordUsage] hook set... I you have the proper equipment you can set the hook and not be afraid. Have you ever seen a bass pro on T.v. set the hook soft while fishing a jig? The only time I'd set the hook softly if I were using a lure with small hooks or a circle hook type tension hook set. But I suppose if you are fishing lighter mono or flouro I could understand it but to me that is using the wrong tool for this application.

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Agreed. I don't back off one bit, maybe give em a little more. Lot of stuff to get through!

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I know I'm using the wrong tool. I only have a couple of bass sticks, one's a med/hvy baitcaster another's a med/hvy spinner, both spooled w/ 12lb mono. Since I only have 2 I need to set them up to be as versitile as possible. If I set as hard as I can when they're 10ft away with 12lb line, they're gonna break it if they have any size, plain and simple. I spose I could start using one of my muskie sticks! laugh

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Another reason to cross their eyes with a hookset is that you want to get them moving in the right direction immediately before they can burrow into the weeds/pads/milfoil/wood you found 'em in.

But - be careful if you swing and miss because that jig is coming back at you at a pace good enough to drop you if it hits you in the head - happened to a guy I know this weekend who shall remain nameless.....Another guy I know put a jig hook through his finger when he tried to catch it.

For the really thick stuff I sometimes flip a heavy jig way up in the air and let it free-fall in an attempt to use the additional momentum to break through whatever cover it is. Another tip is to use streamlined plastics (tubes or beavers, etc) either alone or as trailers so they don't hang up the presentation.

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Do you guys always connect a Flourocarbon leader to the braided mainline? I was originally thinking of just tying my 50# braid directly to the jig

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I don't... I do like coloring the last couple feet or so of my braid with a black sharpie though... Not sure if it makes a huge difference, but it doesn't seem to hurt! smile

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    • Lots of different fish to chase in that lake. Just switch up your target fish and try something different.


    • Minnesota DNR News
      For Immediate Release:
      July 21, 2017
      In This Issue

      Conserving Mille Lacs walleye population requires regulation changes

      Mille Lacs Lake Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) for summer 2017

      Conserving Mille Lacs walleye population requires regulation changes

      Walleye fishing on Mille Lacs Lake will remain closed until Aug. 11 to protect the walleye fishery, and ensure its long-term health and sustainability into the future

      To extend the walleye fishing season through Labor Day, the state will allow for an additional 11,000 pounds of walleye harvest on Mille Lacs 

      New solutions are being sought to rebuild and sustain a healthy Mille Lacs walleye fishery

      New fisheries data collected by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources show the total safe harvest allocation for walleyes on Mille Lacs Lake (44,800 pounds) has already been exceeded this season. To protect the fishery and ensure the long-term sustainability of Mille Lacs Lake’s walleye population, the DNR announced today that walleye fishing will remain closed until Friday, Aug. 11.

      In order to extend the walleye fishing season through Labor Day, the state will allow for an additional 11,000 pounds of walleye harvest. Catch-and-release walleye fishing will run from Friday, Aug. 11, through Monday, Sept. 4, for the Labor Day weekend. Walleye fishing will then be closed from Tuesday, Sept. 5, through Thursday, Nov. 30.

      As these regulation changes were announced, Minnesota DNR Commissioner Tom Landwehr reiterated the state’s commitment to rebuilding and sustaining a healthy walleye fishery in Mille Lacs Lake.

      “Improving the walleye population in Mille Lacs is a top priority for the DNR,” Landwehr said. “We deeply regret the hardships these new regulations will cause for anglers and business owners. But they are essential to protect and enhance the future of walleye fishing in the lake for future generations. We will continue doing everything we can to understand the challenges facing the walleye fishery, and take whatever actions we can to resolve this very difficult situation.”

      Landwehr and DNR fisheries chief Don Pereira noted that allowing for additional catch-and-release fishing in August is essential for area anglers, businesses, and Mille Lacs area communities. The decision to allow for this additional harvest was made with input from the Mille Lacs Fisheries Advisory Committee.

      “We want to allow as much walleye fishing on Mille Lacs as possible,” Pereira said. “So even though state anglers already have caught their quota of fish, the DNR will dip into the allowed conservation overage to reopen the season on Aug. 11.”

      Through the closure, anglers on Mille Lacs Lake may fish for all other species in the lake including bass, muskellunge and northern pike. When fishing for other species, only artificial baits and lures will be allowed in possession, except for anglers targeting northern pike or muskie, who may fish with sucker minnows longer than 8 inches.

      A prohibition on night fishing will remain in place from 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. through Nov. 30. However, anglers may fish for muskie and northern pike at night, but may only use artificial lures longer than 8 inches or sucker minnows longer than 8 inches. Bowfishing for rough fish also is allowed at night but possession of angling equipment is not allowed and only rough fish may be in possession.

      Understanding walleye fishing quotas on Mille Lacs this year, and why that quota was reached earlier than predicted
      The DNR and the Chippewa bands that cooperatively manage Mille Lacs Lake agreed this year to harvest quotas of 44,800 pounds for state anglers and 19,200 pounds for tribal fishing. They also agreed that up to 75,000 pounds of walleye could be harvested from the lake from Dec. 1, 2016 to Nov. 30, 2017.

      That agreement allows the state to use a built-in buffer – the 11,000 pounds difference between the 75,000 pounds conservation cap and the 64,000 pounds combined harvest quotas – in an attempt to allow catch-and-release walleye fishing through Labor Day, following the mid-summer closure. Bi-weekly creel surveys show that state anglers already have reached their quota.

      “The DNR is using its full allotment to maximize opportunities to fish for walleye on Mille Lacs without violating our agreement,” Pereira said. “The DNR, just like area businesses, would greatly prefer to not have fishing restrictions in place. But sustaining and stabilizing Mille Lacs’ walleye population is our primary obligation and public responsibility.”

      Continuing the walleye fishing closure will reduce the number of fish that die after being caught and released, a condition known as hooking mortality. The likelihood of fish suffering hooking mortality increases as water temperatures warm.

      High walleye catch rates on Mille Lacs have increased DNR fishing projections. A hot walleye bite attracted more anglers to the lake, resulting in angler effort that is about double what it was in 2016.

      “Cooler than normal temperatures kept hooking mortality rates low, but more anglers fished Mille Lacs, particularly catching walleye longer than 20 inches,” Pereira said. “That increased the poundage of fish caught and put us over our walleye quota.”

      According to the DNR, bigger fish are biting, in part, because there is a shortage of food for larger walleye. Last fall’s assessment showed that larger walleye were thinner than average.

      Mille Lacs’ hot bite also reflects the findings of studies done in many other fisheries that show catchability actually increases when fish population drops. In Mille Lacs, walleye congregate in preferred spots rather than disperse evenly throughout the lake. Fewer fish in the lake means there is more room in the preferred spots for fish to gather, creating a situation where a larger percentage of the population is in position to be caught rather than gathering in a less preferred but less fished area.

      More information about Mille Lacs Lake, the regulation adjustments and management of the fishery is available on the DNR page at www.mndnr.gov/millelacslake.

      New solutions are being sought to improve and sustain a healthy walleye fishery
      The DNR announced in June that a new external review team of scientists will take a fresh look at Mille Lacs Lake’s walleye fishery, using all of the best science available to gain a better understanding of the lake. This new review, led by walleye expert Dr. Chris Vandergoot of the U.S. Geological Survey, will provide additional recommendations to improve fisheries management of the lake, and contribute to a long-term solution to improving and sustaining a healthy walleye fishery for future generations. The group’s report is expected in time to help guide and inform fisheries management decisions for the 2018 season.

      DNR encourages Minnesotans to fish for other abundant species on Mille Lacs Lake
      As today’s walleye fishing regulation changes were announced, the DNR encouraged all Minnesotans to visit Mille Lacs Lake to fish the other abundant species that the lake has to offer. Mille Lacs Lake’s other opportunities for top-notch fishing will not be affected by the regulation adjustment.

      Bassmaster Magazine named Mille Lacs the nation’s best bass lake in June and will send 50 of the country’s best anglers to the lake In September for its Angler of the Year tournament. Northern pike abound in Mille Lacs, along with muskellunge. In early July, a woman from southern Minnesota caught and released in Mille Lacs what may have been Minnesota’s largest-ever muskellunge.

      To learn more about Mille Lacs Lake and its many great fishing opportunities, visit the DNR page. To plan visit to the Mille Lacs area, visit the Mille Lacs Area Tourism Council page.

      ###

      Mille Lacs Lake Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) for summer 2017
      Q: What is happening with the walleye season this summer on Mille Lacs Lake?

      A: The closure that began July 8 and was set to end July 28 is being extended by two weeks. That means walleye fishing will reopen at 6:01 a.m. on Aug. 11 for catch-and-release only through Labor Day. A night fishing closure also will remain in place from 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. through Nov. 30.

      Q: How does this affect fishing for other species?

      A: Fishing regulations for other species such as smallmouth bass, muskie and northern pike remain the same. During the night closure, there is an exception for muskie and northern pike anglers using artificial lures and sucker minnows longer than 8 inches.

      Q: Why did the DNR extend the closure?

      A: While the DNR wants to allow as much walleye fishing on Mille Lacs as possible, the state is also required to abide by cooperative agreements made with eight American Indian Chippewa bands. The two weeks of additional closure allows the state to abide by a harvest quota set earlier this year with the bands.

      The DNR and the bands agreed to harvest quotas of 44,800 pounds for state anglers and 19,200 pounds for tribal fishing. They also agreed that up to 75,000 pounds of walleye could be sustainably harvested from the lake from Dec. 1, 2016 to Nov. 30, 2017 in order to conserve the population

      That agreement allows the state to use a built-in buffer – the 11,000 pounds difference between the conservation cap of 75,000 pounds and the combined harvest quota of 64,000 pounds – in an attempt to allow catch-and-release walleye fishing through Labor Day, following the mid-summer closure.

      The latest creel survey data shows that state anglers reached their quota of 44,800 pounds of walleye caught from Mille Lacs in early July. Even though state anglers already have caught their quota of fish, the DNR is dipping into the allowed conservation reserve in order to reopen the season on Aug. 11.

      Q: Why has the walleye population in Mille Lacs declined? What is the DNR doing in the long-term to try to conserve the population?

      A: The vast majority of walleye that hatch do not survive to their third autumn in the lake. Walleye numbers have declined to the point that it has become important to protect spawning-sized walleye, particularly the class of walleye that hatched in 2013. It is important to protect the large 2013 year class to replenish aging spawning stock.  Most males from the 2013 class are now mature, but females will not start to contribute in large numbers until next spring. The state is committed to conserving the population of walleyes born in 2013 to improve and rebuild a sustainable population for the future.

      Q: Why do we count hooking mortality during a closed walleye season?

      A: The amount that state anglers can kill (as spelled out in state-bands agreements) also must include fish that die as a result of hooking mortality, the fish that die after being caught and then released back into the water. During the closure, some anglers still catch walleye incidentally and some of those fish die after being released. Under the state-band agreements, those dead fish must be calculated and counted against the state’s allocation.

      Q: How did this cooperative management between the state and the bands of Mille Lacs Lake come to be?   

      A: Recall that in 1999, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld lower-court decisions that allowed the Mille Lacs band and seven other Chippewa bands to exercise off-reservation fishing and hunting rights. The lower federal court also set up guidelines, known as stipulations and protocols, for both sides to follow. These stipulations and protocols provide a framework for how the bands and the state must work cooperatively to manage shared natural resources, including Mille Lacs fish.  In their agreements, the DNR and the bands are required to annually establish the number of walleye that can safely be harvested from Mille Lacs while ensuring sufficient remaining walleye in the lake for a healthy fishery.

      Q: If the walleye population is in decline, why are anglers catching so many?

      A: Fish are biting for two reasons. First, there is a shortage of food for larger walleye. Last fall’s assessment showed that larger walleye were thinner than average. Second, studies in many fisheries show that catchability actually increases when fish population decline.

      In Mille Lacs, walleye congregate in preferred spots rather than disperse evenly throughout the lake. Fewer fish in the lake means there’s more room in the preferred spots for fish to gather, and anglers find these spots where they can catch a larger portion of fish. Finally, while the walleye population has decreased considerably (by half or more), the amount of fishing pressure has declined by a lot more. This means that there are more walleye per angler fishing Mille Lacs today.

      Q: How is the DNR using science and research to help the walleye population?

      A: Mille Lacs Lake is the most studied lake in Minnesota. It is also a complex and changing system. The agency conducts a large number of surveys on the lake annually. These surveys include assessing the abundance of young walleye; setting 52 nets to assess adult abundance; using fine-mesh nets each summer to determine abundance of food (prey fish) for walleye; and using interviews with anglers around the lake (called creel surveys) to estimate the number of fish anglers are catching. The DNR also periodically tags walleye and other species to provide actual population estimates. We are tagging bass this year in cooperation with angling groups, and will be tagging walleye in 2018 and 2019 when the 2013 year class will be reaching full maturity.

      Q: What is the purpose of the external review the DNR has initiated?

      A: The DNR has asked Dr. Chris Vandergoot to lead an independent review of the DNR’s scientific approaches to manage Mille Lacs Lake. Vandergoot is a key member of the international team that co-manages a very significant walleye fishery in Lake Erie. He works for the U.S. Geological Survey in the Sandusky Lake Erie Biological station in Ohio. His review report will be available to the public in early 2018 and will help inform fisheries management decisions for the 2018 season.

      Q: What does the future look like for Mille Lacs walleye?

      A: It is unlikely that Mille Lacs walleye production will return to the levels that state anglers enjoyed over 20 years ago.  The ecosystem of Mille Lacs is going through extreme change, starting with increased water clarity in the mid-1990s, to impacts today from aquatic invasive species such as spiny water flea and zebra mussels. Longer growing seasons are also helping some species such as smallmouth bass but may be hurting others. While walleye will still be abundant, the future fishery will be more diverse, offering angling opportunities for a greater variety of fish.

      ###
    • Lots of politics.  Probably more info in the mille lacs section 
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    • So what is going on with Mille Lacs?
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    • Anyone have any experiance with these?   http://northernlightsrattlereel.com/    
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