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Adventures in Lure Making! - - inline spinners

3 posts in this topic

Welcome to the first installment of Adventures in Lure Making!

I've decided to try my hand at making fishing lures, so I figured I would document my efforts, who knows it might come in handy for someone else in the future laugh

After a bit of reading, I figured I would start out with inline spinners. Why inline spinners? They seemed easy as pie to make, with components readily available for purchase, and I love to use them to fish for everything in fresh water.. SM bass, LM bass, northern pike, musky, trout, salmon, all will hit spinners of one variety or another.

Here's my build of an inline spinner. Sorry if some of the photos are out of focus, lighting in my apartment sucks.

Here's the generic components of an inline spinner, listed from left to right:

Wire frame, spinner body parts, blade and clevis, and of course the hook.


I used a couple different parts for the spinner body, just because I could and I'm experimenting.. I used a standard body(from a bag of random spinner parts), two metal beads, and a brass cylinder.

It's important to size your body, hook, and blade to each other, otherwise you'll have a spinner that isn't weighted correctly and perhaps has other problems.

After acquiring the components for the inline spinner, it's just putting it all together. First thing is to slide the hook on:


Then comes sliding the body components on over both sides of the wire at the bottom of the frame:


The last pieces, clevis and blade. Put the clevis through the hole on the blade, and slide both of the clevis holes over the wire. Make sure the blade's concave side faces inwards, towards the body:


All the parts are on now. All that remains is to make the top loop. B1gf1sh posted a great tutorial somewhere but I lost the link to it.. I'll try to dig it up but I did my best to follow his directions with the tools I had.

Grab the wire with pliers.. rounded are better, but standard needlenose like mine work just fine, the loop ends up being D-shaped instead of circular but it's pretty much just cosmetic.


twist the wire around the tip of the pliers 270 degrees(mine is wrapped just beyond that because I was tightening my loop up around the pliers)


Now all is needed is to continue to hold the loop with the pliers, and wrap around the main wire shaft just below the loop. 2 loops is good enough for most small lures, Big size 8+ blades and such inline spinners probably should have 3 loops.


The finished product, except I still have to trim the end of the wire.. Left my wire cutters at work (doh!)


Hope this is helpful to anyone also wanting to build inline spinners. It's very easy, heck I think this would make a fantastic cub-scout or similar group activity.

Any suggestions or constructive criticism is very welcome!

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pretty good. your on your way cool .. and i have some constructive critisizm for you.

round nose don't only make them look nicer they also have no teeth to nick up the wire that can cut line. file or grind those needle nose teeth for the same effect, but the sharp edges on the sides of needle nose are still a problem. also a round loop is better balanced at the tie point or where the snap connects when using one, helping to prevent twisting of your line. if you want that tutorial it's under ''loops in wire'' here in this forum or on my HSOforum under tutorials... link is Heckler wire tute ...round nose are readily available at hobby stores. top quality or cheapo's. good job.

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