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Bucksnort101

Anyone Build a Cedar Strip Canoe?

15 posts in this topic

Have been thinking about building a Cedar strip solo canoe for a few years now and was wondering if anyone on the site has built one?

Been debating over builing one or just buying a plastic canoe, but the thought of building my own boat really appeals to me.

Any input on what to expect?

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If you are going to do it, you should consider the class in Grand Marais. A friend took it and said it was great and taught him some things he wouldn't have thought of on his own.

They have some kind of school thing up there.

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Thanks Del, the school is the North House Folk School up in Grand Marais. I've looked into the class but tuition alone is $1800+ and then add to that material costs of $1500 it is a bit to spendy for my pocketbook.

Been in contact with aprominant Kayak/Canoe builder today that seems pretty helpful. Going to go with a set of his plans, book, and expertise. Hope to start work over the Winter?

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That is the place. I couldn't remember the name. If you can talk to an experienced guy he might at least be able to give you some tips.

It sounded like there were a few shortcuts, and the glassing is sort of tricky. A temperature controlled place to do it is said to be important since it lets you get the set up time on the resin right.

That's about all I remember at the moment of what he said. Also I think they stapled the strips to something and said you won't notice the staple holes.

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I did notice they have a class for $450 that covers just going through the process of building and glassing the boat. Still a bit spendy.

I've been reading about the process, staples are used to hold the strips in place on the framework when the glue dries. The other method involves a ton of clamps. Clamp method takes much longer as you can only glue a couple strips on at a time, staples allows you to glue as many strips in as you want at a time.

The part the will intimidate me the most is laying up the glass as you mentioned. Looks like a person will need a few extra pairs of hands for that portion of the project.

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I'd say go for it if you think you would like a woodstrip canoe. I've built several wood boats and a canoe, and I've found that it really is not very difficult. The main thing is to use good materials. The fiberglassing is not difficult either - you need a place to work is all. I wouldn't do the fiberglassing in hot weather though - it sets up too fast. I would recommend using epoxy resin rather than a polyester resin, because the epoxy will actually penetrate into the wood and seal it better. Use a good, well-known brand of epoxy - don't skimp. The Minnesota Canoe Assn has some plans available - you might even be able to get a good deal on some forms if you contact them - http://www.canoe-kayak.org/pages/plans.html

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Well, been doing some research and got a book on order, now I'm just trying to find a lccal sourch for Cedar stripping, or lumber I can cut into strips myself.

Looks like I'm going to build a Guillemot Nymph Solo stripper. This is a 10'boat that I'm going to stretch to 14' or 15' to accomodate my weight. Been asking the owner of Guillemot Kayaks several questions on doing this the last day or so and he thinks it will be no problem doing this, in fact he wants to make a longer version himself, just hasn't gotten around to it.

Hopefully this is what it will look like if and when I get started.

Nymph-Bow-Black_1_preview.jpg

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Looks like a nice little canoe - wouldn't be for me, since I don't care for the kayak style seating position, but that's a matter of personal preference.

The hardest part will probably be to find the long pieces for the gunwales - you want good strong, straight grain material for the gunwales - ash is most commonly used - I've also seen sitka spruce and douglas fir used. Douglas fir can add some weight, but it's strong.

The strips for the hull don't need to be full length - you can scarf shorter pieces together because they get covered with fiberglass anyway.

Good luck with your project - post some photos when you are done.

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Yes, the low seat concerns me. If this project comes to fruition i willbe making the canoe longer and wider so am hoping to bring the seat up off the "floor" a bit. Will be using a double paddle for this too so the extra height may be needed with the wider boat?

We'll see what happen, got a lot a reading and researching to do before I even consider starting. Hope to gather tools and materials over the Winter and start on the Canoe in the Spring of 2010.

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There is a place in downtown St Paul that sells supplies. Near Lafayette Bridge. One of the guys I went canoeing with last week pointed it out as we went by.

Just searched. I think it is Northwest Canoe Company. Just off Kellogg Blvd. Very nice web site.

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Me and my dad made a redwood strip canoe a couple years ago. We made everything from scratch except the strongback that the strips go on.

DSC02733.jpg

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If it were me, I wouldn't change the plans too much - by changing the plans, you will also be changing the dynamics of the canoe - building a "prototype", so to speak. Better off just finding a different (proven) plan to start with, if you're not satisfied with the design.

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mrfish:

Nice looking canoe.. Just curious - what are the dimensions of the canoe, and how much does it weigh?

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If you've looked at many different canoe designs, you will find that they are always a compromise - you will always give something up to gain something else.

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The canoe is almost 18ft long and weighs 74lbs. it gets very heavy on long portages. It is very fast in the water but it needs weight in the middle like loaded duluth packs to weigh it down so its not overly tippy.

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