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stoneroller

Lab goes down

6 posts in this topic

Saturday I was working my 3 yr. male lab which I have been doing all spring, it was about 70 degrees and I believe he is in very good shape, he weights about 90lbs. His legs gave out first with very heavy panting and then he gets sick. I had to pick him up and put him on a fourwheeler and bring him home were I got the hose out and cool him off. This not the first time this dog has done this. Any thoughts on this???

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Without more detail I wouldn't say for sureut it could be an EIC episode. Normally the hind legs would go out first and the dof would continue to drag them along until full collapse. Some dogs have died in severe cases while others will show no affects once the episode has passed. EIC is a very serious gentic disease in labs for which a test became available for about 1 year ago. What is the pedigree on this dog?

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Was he hot the other times this happened or does it happen randomly? We have a dog that has seizures now and then. Sometimes they are full blown and other times they're like what you described. He goes down with heavy panting; sort of a mild seizure.

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With the mention of the legs going out, very heavy panting, and the addition of him getting sick (vomiting?) I would lean towards this being more heat stroke related vs EIC. I have not seen or heard of vomiting associated with EIC, but it is a normal symptom of an over heated dog.

Also, the fact that you say he has done this before leads to the thought that he is more susceptible to it now. Once a dog experiences heat stroke once they are more susceptible to it. I would start carrying a thermometer and in warmer temps where he is exerting himself I would check his temp occasionally. If he is getting up around 105*-106* I would start taking it easy and get him cooled down. 106* and above the dog is in danger of heat stroke, and if this is what he has experienced in the past maybe he does not even need to get that warm to show symptoms?

I would recommend calling your vet and see what they recommend based on what you saw. I'm not sure if much can be checked out after the fact.....obviously he is past the episode now but maybe there are some things they can test.

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My vote is heat stroke. Very large dog and warm temps, heavy panting. Earlier in the year too so he may not be used to the heat yet. You may want to get some tips from the vet on how to quickly cool the dog down in the case it happens again.

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i say heat stork i gave this happen to my a few time working them when its a little to warm i brought her in and thats what they said if it happen agian put cold water on top of him or hers head and under the ears it will do the trick good luck

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