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smallmouth

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Does anyone have a temperature guide to tips on where to fish for smallmouth bass, such as depths. I be fishing in a deep sand bottom lake? I have not had much luck so far.

thanks for the help

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Maybe someone else can chime in but depending on where your fishing, I'd be fishing a little shallower this time of the year.

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I cant think of a temperature guide.. I see you are from arizona.. is that where you are fishing?

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Deitz, I think hes talking about temps smallies spawn, when they are in post spawn etc.

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Smallies spawn before largies, while largemouth tend to really get going once you have had water temps in the 60's, smallmouth will start moving in while water temps are in the mid 50's. Not sure the exact number, but 53-55 would be a good guess. Smallies have been known to spawn as deep as 20 feet. Although I dont know how common that is in Minnesota.

RK would know quite a bit more on this subject than myself.

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Hiya -

Missed this thread somehow...

Deitz is right on - smallies do seem to spawn earlier than LMB, and by the time the water's in the high 50s they seem to be in post spawn mode and things can be kind of tough, especially if you have to search for fish. I look for steep breaks near spawning areas, deeper flats, etc. They get their act together and get back to feeding fairly soon, but when they're post-spawn they can be tough.

Smallies ARE really interesting in their spawning habits. As Deitz said, they can spawn in really deep water (compared to LMB) when that's where they find the right combination of conditions. They require a pretty specific substrate, but want to spawn next to an object, so sometimes that's at the base of a reef or rock bar in 15 feet of water... They also will use the exact same spawning location year after year. Pretty cool fish...

Cheers,

Rob Kimm

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