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pikehunter

Help a Rookie

18 posts in this topic

Ok boys. Here's your challenge, should you choose to accept it.

I'm taking up Musky fishing. I'm 31, have caught nearly everything that swims (including a few accidental muskies)and (gasp!) am becoming bored with it all. Muskies seem like the ultimate challenge, made even moreso by the fact that I'm desperately naive about the intricasies of it. I know the basics, but delving further into it is what intrigues me about it as well.

So I come to you for help. I have zero musky gear, a small budget, and will be celebrating my new pursuit with a week off in 13 days. In my situation, what would be the not-so-obvious things I need to make sure I have? What would be the first, say, 5 lures you would buy? What advice do you wish someone would have told you about musky fishing before you started? What are some GPS cordinates of places you've released large fish? What's your favorite muskie shorelunch recipe?

Ok, kidding about the last two. Simply said, I'd like to hit the ground running, and figured there was no better group of people to ask to help me do so.

Many thanks!

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Lures:

1. Cowgirl

2. Bulldawg

3. Topraider

4. Phantom Softtail

5. Squirko

Reales tools (just as important as lures and rod/reel):

1. xLarge Muskie Net

2. Hook Cutters

3. Hook Extractor (I like Simply Fishing The Extractor)

4. Measuring Board

Rod/reel:

1. There are so many choices here.

2. Last time I was at Thorne Brothers, they had a a Abu Garcia 7000c3 reel and 8'6" Tica rod (which will throw the lures 1-3) for $230.

3. Depending on what gear you have for northerns you could throw lures 4 and 5 with that gear.

Since you are on a small budget, you could go with the top 3 lures above and skip the last 2 so you have more money for the release tools and rod/reel.

Go to Thorne Brothers, tell them your situation and budget and have them set you up.

Next, pick a lake, and hit it hard. I know you have alot of fishing experience, but if you want to speed up the learning curve for fishing muskies exclusively, hire a guide on that lake. They'll teach you alot spots, how to run the lures, when, why and how to fish different spots.

Good luck!

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actually you couldnt have timed it better if your available next tuesday night june 9th..

The Twin cities chapter of Muskies inc is having its swapmeet,,,

there will be 'LOTS' of used and unused muskie tackle for great deals to be had,,lures- a ton of lures!!!,rods,reels,dvd's everything muskie,We are the biggest chapter in Muskies inc so there will be alot of stuff

we meet at the knights of columbus in Bloomington right by 494 and lyndale at 7pm.

two of the best shortcuts to get rolling are

joining muskies inc and attending the monthly meetings and outings we do many fishing get togethers in the metro where you could hop in with people

buying some muskie dvd's has a picture is worth a thousand words these will help you with how to work lure styles equip yourself etc.

thorne bros is a great source has we are lucky to have one of thee best musky shops in the world.

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What advice do you wish someone would have told you about musky fishing before you started? What are some GPS cordinates of places you've released large fish?

Honestly, I wish someone would have told me about all the release tools that you have to have for muskie fishing when I first started. Knipex to cut hooks for safety reasons for both the fish and yourself. If you accidentaly get hooked while trying to unhook a fish you will wish you had a pair. I learned the hard way as I was cut very bad. Also some fish get hooked badly and the only way to get a good release sometimes is to cut the hooks. Hooks are cheap, fish are not.

Long pliers (carry a couple of them in case you drop one in the lake), jaw spreader, and I like to carry a scissors in case the fish gets wrapped around the line (cut line when fish is in the net of course). The line can really do some damage to a fish when wrapped, I've even cut my net up when a fish has been tangled in the net. A hook-pick works ok for deeply hooked fish as well.

I recommend spending some time with someone who has spent a lot of time muskie fishing. Joining muskies inc. is good advice as you will learn a lot in a hurry. You could hire a guide as well or I'm sure someone from this forum would be willing to help out.

As for GPS coord's.

N 45*33.324

W 94*09.760

N 46*13.175

W 93*38.496

Just don't tell anyone. Huge fish.

Oh, and I would add a 10" suick to the lure list above and maybe a jackpot.

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N 45° 11.234' W 93° 32.242'

Stupid big, easy to find, always there and in plain sight!

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As a college student, I understand the small budget part.

If you're just starting, I wouldn't rush into super expensive stuff. All lures catch fish, to me its more which lures you feel confident with when using and the only way to find those are to get a bunch and start using them smile As said earlier, look at forums or swap meets for lures. Buying a couple used lures over a couple new will almost cover a new rod.

While most people buy high end rods and reels, I've been very happy over the last 7 or so years with the 3 combos I got at cabelas. 7'6" heavy-med rods with various abu reels for around 150-180 i think. I keep telling myself I'll get better equip soon, but haven't had a reason to yet.

Otherwise, perhaps the best way to hit the ground running is to fish with other more experienced anglers your first couple times out. Even maybe a guide if you really want to shorten the curve.

Hope this helps, good luck

Zelmsdawg

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Pikehunter, love a guy with a sense of humor! Redig, you sure those coordinates and description aren't for a replica hanging somewhere? All of the above excellent advice. I started at the ripe old age of 45 'cause my 10 year old got me into it, and now he's outfishing me. Though I still have him on big fish! We've given up practically everything else we used to do, which was generally some other kind of fishing and some hunting. Wouldn't have it any other way. I'll admit I was lucky early on - the first two fish I caught 2 weeks apart were 51 inchers. That'll hook a guy in a hurry. Best of luck, and enjoy the week.

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I was just about to post the same thing about starting off with Musky fishing. The guys at Thorne Bros started me off with a Extra Heavy rod that can handle 1-3 oz lures. I was thinking of going bigger but they said that I won't be able to throw the common light lures. What lures would you recommend with this type of rod? Thanks.

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Just a general thought and analogy I had, not a comment on anyones post.

If you were to go deer hunting, the first thing you do is talk to people who have hunted deer before and learn as much as you can. Also to see if you can find someone that you can go with. Next, you get the right kind of gun you are going to use for deer hunting, then ammo, then go to the land where those animals are at and then spend time in the areas on that land where you are going to have the best chance at getting one.

So in Muskie terms:

1. This Forum, Go to Muskie's Inc Meetings, Thorne Brothers

2. Spend your money on a good rod/reel. (I liken it to you want an accurate gun that is reliable and isn't going to jam when that big buck walks out)(in muskie fishing I always thought I was reeling fast when I was burning with Abus. Then I got a Saltist and was double as fast and 1/2 as hard)(also going from a 7'6" rod to min 8'6" how much easier it is to keep the cowgirls in the water, figure eights, hooksets, and casting distance)

3. Release tools are just as important as the rod/reel.

4. Then get the lures. This should be the cheapest part of it if you do what others have already posted: [YouNeedAuthorization], [YouNeedAuthorization], the classifieds here, MI lure swap.

5. Then go out with a guide, guys you meet at MI meetings, people on this forum (search whatever lake you want to fish)

6. Put in your time.

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CT, if you bought a rod only rated 1-3 oz, I don't think that would be an XH. I could be wrong, I guess it depends on the brand, but 1-3 oz sounds like a M or MH. I would throw most topwaters and smaller bucktails with that rod.

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Great advice all. And many, many thanks. It's truly appreciated.

Any books that might be worth my time?

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Pikehunter, love a guy with a sense of humor! Redig, you sure those coordinates and description aren't for a replica hanging somewhere?

Definitely not a replica!

As far as books go, i'm a bigger fan of a year or two of the magazine descriptions. Muskies on the Shield by D i c k Pearson always gets praises though from many on the web.

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CT, if you bought a rod only rated 1-3 oz, I don't think that would be an XH. I could be wrong, I guess it depends on the brand, but 1-3 oz sounds like a M or MH. I would throw most topwaters and smaller bucktails with that rod.

It's the Shimano Convergence Line.

Shimano Convergence Specs

Thanks for all the advice guys. I have been picking the brains of several other muskie guys which has helped me get up the curve faster.

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For books, The Complete Guide to Musky Hunting by Jim Saric and Steve Heiting, is pretty good. Covers the basic well but also gives more advanced info. But you gotta read Time on the Water by Bill Gardner. It will prepare you for what you are getting into.

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i second what propster say and i also like pro tactics; muskie by rob kimm and jack burns imo is very good book, cover pretty much of minn, wisc n canada compare to complete guide to musky hunting which is little too general imo. and pro tactics is easier to read and understand at least to me.

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Originally Posted By: propster
Pikehunter, love a guy with a sense of humor! Redig, you sure those coordinates and description aren't for a replica hanging somewhere?

Definitely not a replica!

haha, google the cords propster.

maybe make a trip there, I wouldnt' reccomend buying any of this store's signature lures, but the aquarium sure is nice.

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Forgot about Rob's book - sorry RK! That one is even better!

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So Jredig, would those fish possibly be swimming around in a fish tank at a very very popular store?

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