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esox49

24D Spray rate?

15 posts in this topic

Anyone know the mixing rate (chemical to water) for 2-4-D? I have 2.5 gallon jug of it and the directions wore off. I use just a basic 15 gallon Fimco lawn sprayer. Just need to know how many ounces of spray per gallon of water.

Thanks!

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Labels permit rates in the 0.5 to 2 lb ae/A rate (1-4 pints) for broadleaf weed control in pastures. Most applications go out in the 2 to 3 pint/A range depending on weed size and moisture conditions. Dry conditions require higher rates.

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What product and how much area do you cover per 15 gallons?

I use 1 oz/1000ft2.

In my 3 gallon back pack sprayer, I use 3 oz of the herbicide.

If you know what you have for herbicide, you should be able to find a label online.

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Anyone know the mixing rate (chemical to water) for 2-4-D? I have 2.5 gallon jug of it and the directions wore off. I use just a basic 15 gallon Fimco lawn sprayer. Just need to know how many ounces of spray per gallon of water.

Thanks!

Where did you get the jug of chemical?

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Labels permit rates in the 0.5 to 2 lb ae/A rate (1-4 pints) for broadleaf weed control in pastures. Most applications go out in the 2 to 3 pint/A range depending on weed size and moisture conditions. Dry conditions require higher rates.

That would be a LOT of 2-4D. I don't know where you're reading those specifications but when I broadcast on my small grain the rate is about 3/4pt. per acre with about 10-15 gal. of water per acre coverage.

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Fleet Farm

You need to go back to Fleet Farm and read a label then.

Either that, or if you know the brand, do a google for the product and find a label online.

Once you have the label, or the product NAME, not "2-4-d", I can help you out.

You can't really use what numbers people are throwing out because each product is going to have a different percentage of active ingredient.

Also, depending on what you're going to use to spray, you're going to use different amounts. Depending on how fast you're going to go with your sprayer, you're going to use different amounts.

Personally, the equipment I use, I use 50 ounces per 50,000 sq ft. That's about 3 pints per acre.

I use it in 10 gallons of water. If I mixed at 2 ounces per gallon, I would only have 20 ounces of chemical, and be applying at less than 1/2 rate, and wondering why nothing died.

However, if I'm using my spot sprayer to get close to bushes, flowers and trees, my chemical is rated at 3 oz per gallon in a handheld sprayer.

Lastly, I don't mean to be mean, harsh or rude either. I'm just trying to help you out to do the job right the first time, rather than waste an afternoon / evening, and then wonder or worry why nothing died, or possibly everything died, even the grass.

I could post many pictures where people thought they could just do it themselves, and "if a little chemical works, then alot of chemical will work better, right"?

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Got mine from the brother-in-law who farms. I usually use 1/3 cup per gallon which seems to be about right.

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I have worked with many chemicals and one needs to read the label as LwnmwnMan2 says as they are all different in rates. What works for one weed height may not work for another.

I always cut the rate down when I use a hand sprayer as one can apply a little too much very easily.

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1 pint/acre 43560sq ft = acre

24D under dry condition can be a little hot and may damage some grass roots causing grass to yellow if sprayed on too heavy

i assume you are going after broadleaves and dandilions in your lawn remember if sprayed on wet grass the chemical will lift and move as sun warms the ground and kill flowers and gardens

good luck

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I have found this to be something you need to experiment with to figure out what works best for your setup and the chemical you have purchased. A decent starting point is 1 oz chemical to 1 gallon of water. Try that, then check in a couple weeks to see how it worked. That's probably the lightest you'll want to go, and you might find that 1.5 oz per gallon really puts the knock on 'em.

1.3 oz per gallon is what I use in my 25 gallon sprayer. Ya need to be careful not to make it too rich, or it can kill the grass too or turn it yellow. I can say that because I have used up to 8oz in a 2 gallon sprayer, but at the time I didn't know any better, and that was a waste of chemical.

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With 2-4D you won't have to wait a couple weeks. It's a fast acting herbicide. When I spray my grains in the morning I can see wilting on a lot of plants before day's end.

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With 2-4D you won't have to wait a couple weeks. It's a fast acting herbicide. When I spray my grains in the morning I can see wilting on a lot of plants before day's end.

It's going to depend on the weeds, chemical formulation (percentage of active ingredient) and climate.

I did a yard about a month ago, and it was cool. The dandelions wilted fairly quickly, but the customer complained the creeping charlie was still green and growing.

I went back a week later, the temps had warmed up some, and the creeping charlie had started to turn yellow / red.

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Also, depending on what you're going to use to spray, you're going to use different amounts. Depending on how fast you're going to go with your sprayer, you're going to use different amounts.

I agree 100%. You need to know what the 2-4-D% is before you can tell what rate to spray. There are differnt % of 2-4-D in most kinds of spray so one kind might have a higher rate than another. Best bet is to do as LwnmwnMan2 says and go back to where you bought it from and look at the lable of the same kind you have..

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