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dave12341234

light food pack list?

9 posts in this topic

Im heading up to the BWCA this summer, and i was wondering if anyone had a lightweight food list idea that they used in the past. maybe even accurate as to up to the ounce. we want to carry just enough food in for us to eat for 6 days, ubt we dont want to waste any. we will be fishing, assuming we catch something. that would cut back on alot of food that we bring in.

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What we bring is almost 100% dehydrated food. Then all you need for cooking is a tea kettle. Then each camper takes a small plastic contaner with a lid. We bring ramen noodles(all kinds) instant mashed potatoes, gravy pakets, instant milk, hot and cold cereal, dry pudding packets, minute rice and othe homade dehydrated meals like chile, hamberger and hotdish.

The trick is to consalodate allthe tiny packs into one large ziplock. For example put 10-20 ramen packs into a 1/2 gal ziplock and the flavor packs into another ziplock.

No canned food, no freeze dried no big pots or pans.

For fish you will want to pack some oil in a 20 oz bottle, small frypan, premade dry batter in a zip lock, and some paper towels.

We also have jerky and trailmix to snack on when we a re on the trail/water.

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There is a method called "freezerbag cooking" and if you do a search engine, you'll find a web site of the same name. It has recipes and such. It is absolutely brilliant. Nothing lighter and more efficient. The backpackers are huge into this.

Basically, you boil water and rehydrate instant mashed potatos, instant rice, ramen (toss that season packet and use your own) Foil pouch chicken, freeze dried veggies (trader joes, natural food stores etc), I even cook and dehydrate ground venison.

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if you look by the tuna and stuff there is chicken that doesnt need to be refigerated and add it to noodles and you cant taste a diff. from anyother- add a little kick to what everyour making

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I've found browning lean hamburger (93/7 or leaner), rinsing in it in extremely HOT water to remove extra grease, then dehydrating it works pretty good for using in hamburger helper. No need for a dehydrater if you don't have one. Just set your oven to low heat and keep the door open a bit for moisture to escape. I recommend a book called the Back Country Kitchen by Teresa Maroni (spelling?). Pretty helpful in getting away from the standard freeze dried foods. I do bring some meals of freeze dried myself, along with precooked bacon, hard cheese, salami, some vegetables, jerky, oatmeal, powdered soups, noodles, rice mixes, like broccoli and cheese. I also think the foil packed chicken breasts aren't too bad and easy to use. I like to eat well when camping so I'm willing to sacrifice a bit in the weight department. I always have enough food for the entire time I'm there plus one meal, just in case the fish aren't biting or I get delayed on my exit.

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check out the book Lip Smakin Back Pakin, it has a ton of recipees and if I remember corectly it has the detailes weight info you are looking for. A lot of the recipees use dehydrated hamburger as sugested above, and most of it you have to dehydrate yourself, however there are recipees for store bought goods.

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Be a bit careful about relying on fish as a meal...That being said, don't forget your hudson bay bread.

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Dehydrated veggies are a great pick. Porcini mushrooms and Sun dried tomatoes are great flavor.

You can leave the fish fry pan at home with some foil and lemon pepper. That's good on ANY fish!

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Lots of packaged meals in the regular grocery store are ideal and lightweight. Lipton makes lots of pasta meals. Zatarains makes beans and rice. Look for things that merely need to have water added, or just a little cooking oil or butter. Often those just help the taste and aren't necessary.

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