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goose89

Powerloading VS. POWERLOADING

145 posts in this topic

I know this debate has been hashed before. I'm not against it, and do powerload my boat (18 Tin / roller trailer). I'm not afraid to back my trailer in the water enough to easily drive it up to the front roller and stop the motor. Most times the boat stayes in place and I can go up front and hook it up. If not, keep in gear at idle speed does it.

That said, I witnessed (several times) some serious POWERLOADING this w/e, and can't say I approve. Trailers with 1/2 the rollers out of the water, like they were afraid to get their truck tires wet. Then the full throttle run up the trailer. Once up the the front, if they could make it, they kept the motor gunned to keep the boat from rolling back, while taking there time going up front to hook up, while talking and joking around with his buddy in the truck (who could have hooked up) to wait a minute before pulling boat out.

I'm watching gravel and silt being washed out past me, for what seemed like a minute, one time. This gent didn't realize what he was doing, and seemed to enjoy the challenge and revving the motor, while seeing the "dust" fly behind his boat.

I though this was just a "one time Charlie", but sadly, saw similar POWERLOADING practices each time I was out Friday, Sat. and Monday. For those of us with roller trailers, esp., PLEASE, back the trailer in, run it up, get it hooked ASAP, and kill the motor. We don't need the motor at 1/2 or full throttle to keep it there, usually.

Then there are those of us who crank the entire way up. I don't understand that either, but at least they aren't blowing the end of the landing out and creating the blow hole mound my prop hates.

Sorry for the rant, but we ought to take care of our busy accesses, not to mention spending less time getting in and out of busy accesses. Good luck.

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I'm guessing these folks are big ex jocks with 150 HP engines and an ego that needs constant stroking and massaging. Oh I bet they didn't catch a darn thing either but they looked good trying.

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The "offenders" I witnessed didn't have that big of motors or expensive boats. My point, or "complaint" is - Back the trailer into the water as to utilize both the rollers and your motor. Rollers weren't made so just the first set had to be int the water and then run it up the rest at full throttle.

Some landings are tough, but this one is not. Nice taper and deep enough to get on and off without any drastic / fancy measures. Not looking to get into a "fancy, big boat vs plain, small boat" arguement.

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Here's what I do, and I may be wrong, but I back it in so the back set of rollers are in the water. Then power my boat up, not full throttle, just enough to get it on the trailer. Then, whoever is fishing with me connects the strap and winches it the rest of the way up. I can usually just put my motor right above idle to keep it on the trailer.

I agree the ones that leave it wide open are causing some damage.

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I guess I don't understand why you don't back it in farther, so you can run it up farther (all the way) and make use of the rollers. Why not make it easier (not winching) and faster.

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Hey Goose, I stopped POWERLOADING years ago, now I just idle as far as idle will take me, and crank from there. For the sake of not creating blowout holes at landings.

But every trailer has a sweet spot for what is needed, and some roller trailers get backed in too far and then the boats don't come up straight. So those who you are taling about might be rookies or they may know EXACTLY how far their trailers need to be backed in. Ours, for example, needs the rear rollers in the water and it has to be exactly level from side to side. Go farther than that and the stern swings around a bit.

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That's what it is for me Box, if I go in too far, it's not straight on the trailer. Part of it is most likely due to launching on the rivers and having to deal with current I'm sure. But I know if I put my back rollers just in the water it's straight even if I crank it on. If not, it's a 50/50.

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I fish alone quite a bit and I have found the sweet spot for my trailer ,,,,4 inches of the fender out of the water and I can motor my boat to almost a foot from the front roller ,,,a little bit of gas and Im set ,,,,winch it up the last 6 inches or so and make room for the next guy,,,,hardest part is getting the trailer close to the dock so I can jump in and out of my boat easily

LAS

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LoonASea, That's my situation most of the time, and MO.

I guess I'm lucky that my trailer does a decent job of centering the boat that far back in the water. I do have to have it level though. My previous trailer, didn't seem to matter, it always center the boat. I miss that trailer.

I see your point Sandmann, if the trailer doesn't load your boat when farther back. Maybe that was the situation with the gents I saw this past w/e. I wish there were as consciensious as you, if that's their situation. It was ridiculous.

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My dad complains to me everytime I crank my boat on. It takes me maybe a minute to load my tyee. The way I look at it the time I do try to powerload it, I will hit a rock with my prop. I just stay on the safe side, I do not have the extra money to be replacing props.

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I think sometimes people are in just too big of a hurry. Taking an extra minute to crank the boat up in order to be safe shouldn't ruin anyone's day.

If it takes a guy 1-2 minutes extra to load a boat what does it really matter? I figure I'm out to enjoy the day, not to rush through my fishing day in order to rush home so i can start in on the "to do" list thats been piling up.

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If I hear any moaning about the 1-2 minutes it takes me to hand crank my boat, it will then turn into 5-7 minutes to hand crank my boat. wink

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If they are powerloading and stiring up that much sand and mud, they will pay for it with a damaged water pump impeller as they will suck in to much garbage into the water inyake.

There will always be those kind and there will always be the leaner at the landings.

I have seen many newbie's at the landing and I will always go over and offer help if they need it.

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the sweet spot for my trailer is with the tips of the fenders just poking out of the water. I really cant POWERLOAD my 7.5 horse so i just get it as far up as possible, give it a little throttle to keep it on the trailer while i winch it the rest of the 1ft to get it loaded.

my trailer is horrible at centering my boat if i dont hit the 4-5" wide center rollers. but thankfully my boat is light enough (14' tin) that i can pick the back end up and shift it into place if needed.

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Powerloading Discussion 2007

I've made an effort not to power load in shallow lakes. I've seen too many ripped up accesses from the practice, and heard too many folks complaining about why the DNR doesn't fix it.

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I experienced some serious POWERLOADING on Monday evening. The guy had his trailer submerged all of 1.5 ft. in the water and could not get the boat on the trailer for some odd reason. crazy I waited 10 minutes before the guy got it halfway on and absolutely hammered down on the throttle for about 20 seconds. This landing is very shallow and gets trashed by folks who insist on not getting there feet wet and cranking the rest of the way. I agree that every trailer has a sweet spot for loading and unloading. I powerload if the conditions call for it....but in all honesty it's much quicker for me to just crank the boat on.

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I will always go over and offer help if they need it.

Amen brother!!!!

As for me, I dont' have a fancy boat or trailer. I back my trailer until the rear rollers are under water. Sometimes in SW MN that also means the trucks front tires are in the water, no kiddin. I do this because if I get the trailer too deep the boat won't center. Once backed in, I ride the boat onto the trailer as far as it will go, which is usually half way. Then crank the rest of the way. When I'm alone or the weather is bad this isn't so easy but if were easy it wouldn't be nearly as fun. grin

All boat/trailer combos are different. I'm not a fan of seeing big motors washing out the landings but then again, here in SW MN, their big washout just made the landing a little deeper which is nice in July and August when things are good and dried up.

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Slightly on/slightly off topic,

Have any of you heard the MN Twins commercial where they say, "Joe Crede makes opposing pitchers look as silly as an Iowa guy trying to back a boat trailer"?

Now thats funny right there....I don't care who you are.

Personally, I don't spend a lot of time worrying about how other folks load their boat. I do however enjoy a just bit of satisfaction pulling up to the dock, backing my trailer in, loading my boat and driving off, while three other guys on the next dock are figuring out how to get their's loaded. Yes I do power load.

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I'm with you on the powerloading, there's no reason for it.

Heck, I don't even get in my boat to load it. I grab the rope, push it out past the end of the trailer, walk out into the water in my Keens/bare feet, pull the boat onto the bunk, & winch it up. Have it down to enough of a science that I suspect I can do this faster than most people can powerload. Never heard anyone complain about my speed at an access. wink

Since I fish a lot of smaller lakes with shallow, crappy accesses, I got in this habit & just never bothered to load with the motor.

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The guy at spartan trailers told me to only have the back rollers in water so boat goes on straight and level.

I winch, not power load however.

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When theres 2 of us I can load either of our boats with not much more than idle all the way up to the bumper on either the bunk or roller trailer, other guy hooks me up and is pulling me off the ramp by the time I get the motor trimmed up. Total load time from trailer hitting water to boat on dry land, a minute.

Alone add about a minute to that.

Boats are a 17' Targa and a Alumacraft 175 Trophy.

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I'm with you on the powerloading, there's no reason for it.

Heck, I don't even get in my boat to load it. I grab the rope, push it out past the end of the trailer, walk out into the water in my Keens/bare feet, pull the boat onto the bunk, & winch it up. Have it down to enough of a science that I suspect I can do this faster than most people can powerload. Never heard anyone complain about my speed at an access. wink

Since I fish a lot of smaller lakes with shallow, crappy accesses, I got in this habit & just never bothered to load with the motor.

That is how I do it. I have "spidermanned" my way out the drivers door, down the step bar, over to the tire, around the bumper, and onto the tonge of the trailer though. crazy But that water can get mighty cold sometimes, and wet squishy shoes bother me. And I can still do it faster and smoother than most.

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I usually just bring along my hipboots and throw them on before I drive around and back the trailer in. Takes about 30 seconds and I don't have to worry about slipping off the trailer and driving home with wet feet.

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I usually just bring along my hipboots and throw them on before I drive around and back the trailer in. Takes about 30 seconds and I don't have to worry about slipping off the trailer and driving home with wet feet.

Amen there...

Knee high boots are always in my truck bed and I winch it on....

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