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mrklean

Arrows

14 posts in this topic

While i have started looking into a new bow i have started to pay more attention to how heavy the arrows are i am shooting to maxamize speed, something i never did before. What are some light arrows out there now? Im shooting maxams and i saw they were like 7.8 grains per inch. What else is out there.

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I wouldnt go too light if you plan on using your bow for hunting, because you will lose some kinetic energy and might not have the penetration of a heavier arrow.

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thanks a ton that looks pretty good, no carbon express, kinda suprised by that.

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mrklean - Name some Carbon Express shafts you're interested in and I'll get the gpi and any other info you need.

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I was just looking for some of the basics on the Expresses, i have maxams i like them but they are spendy just seeing what some of the less spendy ones weighed in at.

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IMHO the archery industry puts way to much emphasis on arrow speed and having the "fastest shooting bow" on the market. I think you will be better served shooting a heavier arrow, partucularly if hunting larger game such Elk, Bear, Caribou,and even large Deer, etc...

A faster arrow isn't going to do much good if it does not carry enough energy downrange to effectivly penetrate and thus kill the animal you are after.

Best to have a heavier arrow, with a very, very sharp broadhead on the end of it. You will not shoot as flat, but that's what practice is for;)

Hope you find what your looking for, I shoot Traditional Archery only and have just started looking into shooting carbons, I hope to make them as heavy as I can get and still not have them drop to the ground after only 30 yards;)

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you may lose good arrow flight by shooting lighter arrows. typically, you should be shooting arrows that are the right weight. draw weight times 5. for example, 70 lb draw should be shooting 350 grain arrows, 60 lb draw shooting 300 grain arrows, so on and so forth. +/- 5% this will make your arrows fly the best. it also makes a difference on draw length, as far as to how long the arrow is and the difference in weight by cutting off a few inches. i do believe that broadhead/field point weight is then added to the arrow, thus affecting the overall weight of your arrow. make sense?

i shoot 72 lb draw weight. shoot easton axis xt infused carbon 10.1 gpi arrows, with 100 grain rage broadheads, and a 28.5" draw length. all math done, i am shooting a little heavier than recommended, but only 28 grains, which falls into that +/- 5%. does this make sense?? confused

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I can tell you that the easton full metal jackets are 9.9 grains per inch mine weigh 420 grains with 100 grain head at 74# figures out at 5.67 grains per pound 279 fps. I used to shoot the carbon express but had problems with the breaking when they switched too the new cross weave style a few years back I never had a problem with the older style you just could not break them. Bucksnort look into the goldtip traditionals they have the wood grain pattern and fly great it just takes a little time playing with them, I start with a full lenghth shaft just glue a insert add a feild point,nock and shoot at ten yards and keep cutting it a 1/4 inch at a time until the shaft strikes the bale a little knock high but straight left to right then cut the rest of your shaft to this lenghth fletch and have fun.

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Thanks Archerysniper, I tried the Gold Tip Trads on another bow and had a hard time tuning them to the Recurve I was using at the time.

Tried the Beman MFX shafts as well, they tuned a bit better for me, and had greater penetration with how skinny they were.

Going to try some newer shafts made by Arrow Dynamics. They are Carbons made specifically for Traditional bows. Front half of the shaft is parallel, then it starts to taper to the nock end.

Same arrow seem to fly well out of several different bows due to the high weight forward design and the tapered back end.

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While i have started looking into a new bow i have started to pay more attention to how heavy the arrows are i am shooting to maxamize speed, something i never did before. What are some light arrows out there now? Im shooting maxams and i saw they were like 7.8 grains per inch. What else is out there.

I’d recommend using an arrow selection chart. Most major arrow manufactures have an arrow selection chart on their web site. The basic info you need is your draw length and the poundage you have your bow set to. This information will determine what type of arrow you can shoot. The Maxima your shooting now is a great arrow. I know a lot of guys that shoot them. It depends on the manufacture, but they’ll usually recommend a number of different sizes in all the different models.

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i shoot ICS hunters at 8.4 GPI and have not had a problem with pass through. the only one i havent had a complete pass through on was 12 yards and the deer rolled onto the arrow before it could make it all the way out. i got the front 1/2 of my arrow though.

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Beman makes the ICS. Another new arrow on the market is made by Trophy Ridge. I have a half dozen coming to see how they shoot. They are supposed to be a thinner arrow and everything I have read about them says they're good.

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I thought Beman made them i was looking at some bemans maybe those were the ones just looking now. Maybe its just me but i never bought into Trophy Ridge stuff, i have a buddy who bought one of those sights right when they came out and i just have never thought to highly of them i dont know i guess its just me

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