Guests - If You want access to member only forums on HSO. You will gain access only when you sign-in or Sign-Up on HotSpotOutdoors.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Inthehollow

heat pump

5 posts in this topic

any experts on air to air heat pumps trying to make a decsion. thanks Bret

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

do you live in the country? Have cheap electric or expensive fuel. If ya got the money now. definetly worth looking into. I don't have graph or formula, but you can figure out if it may worth doing by doing some calculations.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

high lp, discount electric for heat just wondering how they work. thanks Bret

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We put in a air source a year ago and figured we save over 300 therms last winter compared to the previous year. We also put a 93 percent furnace with it and I am sure that helped too. they do work nicely during the transition months like now. Do not count on them for heat in deep winter but they can assist down to 20 degrees but really start to shine above 32 degrees. I do recommend that you replace the furnace and you will probably put in a larger a coil because the heat pump will be larger than your current central air. If you want to research it there is a 2 stage air source by Hallowell but I am not sure of cost and payback. It is supposed to heat down to well below zero For the absolute least expensive costs per month in hvac look at geothermal and the infrastructure (trenches or wells) costs in your area. You would be looking at 15k or more usually but only spend a few hundred per year on electricity to run it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would agree with DrKen. We also put in an air source heat pump (York) last fall. We were able to reuse our existing furnace so we were able to save some $$$ there. In conjunction with our heat pump we also had an electric plenum heater (Thermolec) installed into the ductwork of the furnace. By doing this we were able to take advantage of the dual fuel program (off peak) offered by our electric utility. Our heating bill was about 1/3 of what it usually was by using total electric. During a typical winter we would use 1100-1200 gallons of LP, this winter we didn't use any. We figure about a 5 year payback, sooner if LP goes up in price. I don't think that you can go wrong with your decision. Good Luck.

Brian

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0