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MARINERMAGNUM

Cape May Warbler

20 posts in this topic

Had a real fallout overnite,new birds in the yard today were:Harris's Sparrow,Grosbeaks,Orioles,Indigo Bunting,Yellow Warbler,and this Cape May who is assaulting my apple tree's blossoms. Pretty cooperative bird,I got about 60 keeper images of him and wanted to share a couple. This weekend should be fun!

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well I gotta say when the first one come up,, I was in awe of the contrast of colours,, UNTIL the second one come up,, that second one blows me away!!! stunning colours, clarity, DOF, focus,, outstanding work!

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The second one looks like it should go on a tourism brochure. grin

Both are gorgeous, but the second one is stunning.

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man I keep coming to this thread just to have another peek... I can't get over how crisp it is,, please share with us how you got it so brilliant! tripod of course,, yes?

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Very nice MM!

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Thanks for the kind words everyone!

Nope,no tripod,it was handheld. I had my mono pod out for awhile,but those Warblers jump around so much in the branches that the monopod was useless. I just hold as steady as I can,and get as close as I can.

I sure love this time of year,even the average Goldfinch pops pretty decent. I shot this one while waiting for the Warblers to return.

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unfreakin believable!! love the pinks, blues and yellows!! wow!!!!!!!!!!

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I feel sheepish in asking, as I should probably know what everybody here shoots now,, but er,, what do you shoot?

a canon right? that's a cannon lens,, what's the lens ,, a 400mm?

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Yes this was with a 50D Canon,Canon lens @300mm,F4.5,Shot in the smaller SRAW1 format [7.1mp]. The 50D is a pretty decent camera,but I have always thought the 15mp it offers is overkill and I almost never use it at full resolution. I never print bigger than 20x30,and if you fill the frame,7mp is enough. I'm hoping they [Canon] retain the 40D in the line up but add the 50D's key features-Unbelievable LCD,lens micro adj.,iso 6400,DiGiC 4 processor,and keep it at 10.1mp-it would be the perfect 1.6 crop body-for me anyway.

This morning I see there is also a Blackburnian and another Yellow Warbler in the same tree,so hopefully I can get some more images tonight-gotta leave for work now- mad

Thanks.

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yea work keeps getting in my way too, but of course without it, I wouldn't be able to buy all my fancy schmancy stuff,, but of course hubbys' job has been a help too smile

I'll watch for your new images smile

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Apple blossoms and a cape may warbler, hmmmmm.. I don't see how you could go wrong with that combination, never mind you just have to walk out your door to get it! Lucky, lucky you! The warmth and quality of the light is superbly put to work in the second image, you even get great detail in the shadowed area of the bird. Awesome how the sky outlines the bird in that image, with nothing transecting the head, beak, or upper body........ incredible image. Also love that this is not a setup, it's a spontaneous capture that still retains many of the qualities that a setup image might have.

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I don't even know what more could be said about these. I am speechless!

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Really nice work, MM. Great setting and light!

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It was pouring down rain most of today here but I did have brief sightings of the Blackburnian Warbler after 5pm,but was forced to watch from the house with binocs. Hopefully tomorrow will bring better weather for shooting.

I was going to delete this image as I messed up and didn't frame the shot properly,so it wasn't one of my keepers. I cropped/rotated it a little,and couldn't bring myself to delete it after thinking about how I waited through that whole frigid winter to see these beautiful little guys. I only wish their visit wasn't so brief.

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Fantastic photos MM! I wouldn't kick myself too hard over that last image. Much better than any of us non-photo savvy folk could ever dream of taking. Your apple trees are about 4 - 5 days ahead of those here. Don't you ever wonder what might show up if you just stayed home and played hooky once in awhile? wink

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Sue, unless someone uses the "Save for Web" feature in Photoshop, the images posted here will have the camera/lens/capture data, called exif data, embedded in them.

You can download a free program to view exif. Just do a Google search for exif viewer or exif reader and you'll find one. When you have it, just open it, drag the image off the site onto your desktop and click down on "file" and "open."

I always use the "Save for Web" because it saves bandwidth on the site by stripping unneeded data, but that includes stripping exif data. That's why I generally post my exif data with the image, so people can see what was done and learn what to do/not to do based on that. smilesmile

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ah, thanks for the tip Steve smile

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You could delete him into my keep file any day. There is no irruption of warblers here yet, but inklings of things to come, I hope. I came back from walking the dog to an indigo bunting in immature plummage, a black and white climbing up a tree trunk, and a rose-breasted at a feeder. Now a peak of sunshine would be perfect.

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  • Posts

    • Lots of different fish to chase in that lake. Just switch up your target fish and try something different.


    • Minnesota DNR News
      For Immediate Release:
      July 21, 2017
      In This Issue

      Conserving Mille Lacs walleye population requires regulation changes

      Mille Lacs Lake Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) for summer 2017

      Conserving Mille Lacs walleye population requires regulation changes

      Walleye fishing on Mille Lacs Lake will remain closed until Aug. 11 to protect the walleye fishery, and ensure its long-term health and sustainability into the future

      To extend the walleye fishing season through Labor Day, the state will allow for an additional 11,000 pounds of walleye harvest on Mille Lacs 

      New solutions are being sought to rebuild and sustain a healthy Mille Lacs walleye fishery

      New fisheries data collected by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources show the total safe harvest allocation for walleyes on Mille Lacs Lake (44,800 pounds) has already been exceeded this season. To protect the fishery and ensure the long-term sustainability of Mille Lacs Lake’s walleye population, the DNR announced today that walleye fishing will remain closed until Friday, Aug. 11.

      In order to extend the walleye fishing season through Labor Day, the state will allow for an additional 11,000 pounds of walleye harvest. Catch-and-release walleye fishing will run from Friday, Aug. 11, through Monday, Sept. 4, for the Labor Day weekend. Walleye fishing will then be closed from Tuesday, Sept. 5, through Thursday, Nov. 30.

      As these regulation changes were announced, Minnesota DNR Commissioner Tom Landwehr reiterated the state’s commitment to rebuilding and sustaining a healthy walleye fishery in Mille Lacs Lake.

      “Improving the walleye population in Mille Lacs is a top priority for the DNR,” Landwehr said. “We deeply regret the hardships these new regulations will cause for anglers and business owners. But they are essential to protect and enhance the future of walleye fishing in the lake for future generations. We will continue doing everything we can to understand the challenges facing the walleye fishery, and take whatever actions we can to resolve this very difficult situation.”

      Landwehr and DNR fisheries chief Don Pereira noted that allowing for additional catch-and-release fishing in August is essential for area anglers, businesses, and Mille Lacs area communities. The decision to allow for this additional harvest was made with input from the Mille Lacs Fisheries Advisory Committee.

      “We want to allow as much walleye fishing on Mille Lacs as possible,” Pereira said. “So even though state anglers already have caught their quota of fish, the DNR will dip into the allowed conservation overage to reopen the season on Aug. 11.”

      Through the closure, anglers on Mille Lacs Lake may fish for all other species in the lake including bass, muskellunge and northern pike. When fishing for other species, only artificial baits and lures will be allowed in possession, except for anglers targeting northern pike or muskie, who may fish with sucker minnows longer than 8 inches.

      A prohibition on night fishing will remain in place from 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. through Nov. 30. However, anglers may fish for muskie and northern pike at night, but may only use artificial lures longer than 8 inches or sucker minnows longer than 8 inches. Bowfishing for rough fish also is allowed at night but possession of angling equipment is not allowed and only rough fish may be in possession.

      Understanding walleye fishing quotas on Mille Lacs this year, and why that quota was reached earlier than predicted
      The DNR and the Chippewa bands that cooperatively manage Mille Lacs Lake agreed this year to harvest quotas of 44,800 pounds for state anglers and 19,200 pounds for tribal fishing. They also agreed that up to 75,000 pounds of walleye could be harvested from the lake from Dec. 1, 2016 to Nov. 30, 2017.

      That agreement allows the state to use a built-in buffer – the 11,000 pounds difference between the 75,000 pounds conservation cap and the 64,000 pounds combined harvest quotas – in an attempt to allow catch-and-release walleye fishing through Labor Day, following the mid-summer closure. Bi-weekly creel surveys show that state anglers already have reached their quota.

      “The DNR is using its full allotment to maximize opportunities to fish for walleye on Mille Lacs without violating our agreement,” Pereira said. “The DNR, just like area businesses, would greatly prefer to not have fishing restrictions in place. But sustaining and stabilizing Mille Lacs’ walleye population is our primary obligation and public responsibility.”

      Continuing the walleye fishing closure will reduce the number of fish that die after being caught and released, a condition known as hooking mortality. The likelihood of fish suffering hooking mortality increases as water temperatures warm.

      High walleye catch rates on Mille Lacs have increased DNR fishing projections. A hot walleye bite attracted more anglers to the lake, resulting in angler effort that is about double what it was in 2016.

      “Cooler than normal temperatures kept hooking mortality rates low, but more anglers fished Mille Lacs, particularly catching walleye longer than 20 inches,” Pereira said. “That increased the poundage of fish caught and put us over our walleye quota.”

      According to the DNR, bigger fish are biting, in part, because there is a shortage of food for larger walleye. Last fall’s assessment showed that larger walleye were thinner than average.

      Mille Lacs’ hot bite also reflects the findings of studies done in many other fisheries that show catchability actually increases when fish population drops. In Mille Lacs, walleye congregate in preferred spots rather than disperse evenly throughout the lake. Fewer fish in the lake means there is more room in the preferred spots for fish to gather, creating a situation where a larger percentage of the population is in position to be caught rather than gathering in a less preferred but less fished area.

      More information about Mille Lacs Lake, the regulation adjustments and management of the fishery is available on the DNR page at www.mndnr.gov/millelacslake.

      New solutions are being sought to improve and sustain a healthy walleye fishery
      The DNR announced in June that a new external review team of scientists will take a fresh look at Mille Lacs Lake’s walleye fishery, using all of the best science available to gain a better understanding of the lake. This new review, led by walleye expert Dr. Chris Vandergoot of the U.S. Geological Survey, will provide additional recommendations to improve fisheries management of the lake, and contribute to a long-term solution to improving and sustaining a healthy walleye fishery for future generations. The group’s report is expected in time to help guide and inform fisheries management decisions for the 2018 season.

      DNR encourages Minnesotans to fish for other abundant species on Mille Lacs Lake
      As today’s walleye fishing regulation changes were announced, the DNR encouraged all Minnesotans to visit Mille Lacs Lake to fish the other abundant species that the lake has to offer. Mille Lacs Lake’s other opportunities for top-notch fishing will not be affected by the regulation adjustment.

      Bassmaster Magazine named Mille Lacs the nation’s best bass lake in June and will send 50 of the country’s best anglers to the lake In September for its Angler of the Year tournament. Northern pike abound in Mille Lacs, along with muskellunge. In early July, a woman from southern Minnesota caught and released in Mille Lacs what may have been Minnesota’s largest-ever muskellunge.

      To learn more about Mille Lacs Lake and its many great fishing opportunities, visit the DNR page. To plan visit to the Mille Lacs area, visit the Mille Lacs Area Tourism Council page.

      ###

      Mille Lacs Lake Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) for summer 2017
      Q: What is happening with the walleye season this summer on Mille Lacs Lake?

      A: The closure that began July 8 and was set to end July 28 is being extended by two weeks. That means walleye fishing will reopen at 6:01 a.m. on Aug. 11 for catch-and-release only through Labor Day. A night fishing closure also will remain in place from 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. through Nov. 30.

      Q: How does this affect fishing for other species?

      A: Fishing regulations for other species such as smallmouth bass, muskie and northern pike remain the same. During the night closure, there is an exception for muskie and northern pike anglers using artificial lures and sucker minnows longer than 8 inches.

      Q: Why did the DNR extend the closure?

      A: While the DNR wants to allow as much walleye fishing on Mille Lacs as possible, the state is also required to abide by cooperative agreements made with eight American Indian Chippewa bands. The two weeks of additional closure allows the state to abide by a harvest quota set earlier this year with the bands.

      The DNR and the bands agreed to harvest quotas of 44,800 pounds for state anglers and 19,200 pounds for tribal fishing. They also agreed that up to 75,000 pounds of walleye could be sustainably harvested from the lake from Dec. 1, 2016 to Nov. 30, 2017 in order to conserve the population

      That agreement allows the state to use a built-in buffer – the 11,000 pounds difference between the conservation cap of 75,000 pounds and the combined harvest quota of 64,000 pounds – in an attempt to allow catch-and-release walleye fishing through Labor Day, following the mid-summer closure.

      The latest creel survey data shows that state anglers reached their quota of 44,800 pounds of walleye caught from Mille Lacs in early July. Even though state anglers already have caught their quota of fish, the DNR is dipping into the allowed conservation reserve in order to reopen the season on Aug. 11.

      Q: Why has the walleye population in Mille Lacs declined? What is the DNR doing in the long-term to try to conserve the population?

      A: The vast majority of walleye that hatch do not survive to their third autumn in the lake. Walleye numbers have declined to the point that it has become important to protect spawning-sized walleye, particularly the class of walleye that hatched in 2013. It is important to protect the large 2013 year class to replenish aging spawning stock.  Most males from the 2013 class are now mature, but females will not start to contribute in large numbers until next spring. The state is committed to conserving the population of walleyes born in 2013 to improve and rebuild a sustainable population for the future.

      Q: Why do we count hooking mortality during a closed walleye season?

      A: The amount that state anglers can kill (as spelled out in state-bands agreements) also must include fish that die as a result of hooking mortality, the fish that die after being caught and then released back into the water. During the closure, some anglers still catch walleye incidentally and some of those fish die after being released. Under the state-band agreements, those dead fish must be calculated and counted against the state’s allocation.

      Q: How did this cooperative management between the state and the bands of Mille Lacs Lake come to be?   

      A: Recall that in 1999, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld lower-court decisions that allowed the Mille Lacs band and seven other Chippewa bands to exercise off-reservation fishing and hunting rights. The lower federal court also set up guidelines, known as stipulations and protocols, for both sides to follow. These stipulations and protocols provide a framework for how the bands and the state must work cooperatively to manage shared natural resources, including Mille Lacs fish.  In their agreements, the DNR and the bands are required to annually establish the number of walleye that can safely be harvested from Mille Lacs while ensuring sufficient remaining walleye in the lake for a healthy fishery.

      Q: If the walleye population is in decline, why are anglers catching so many?

      A: Fish are biting for two reasons. First, there is a shortage of food for larger walleye. Last fall’s assessment showed that larger walleye were thinner than average. Second, studies in many fisheries show that catchability actually increases when fish population decline.

      In Mille Lacs, walleye congregate in preferred spots rather than disperse evenly throughout the lake. Fewer fish in the lake means there’s more room in the preferred spots for fish to gather, and anglers find these spots where they can catch a larger portion of fish. Finally, while the walleye population has decreased considerably (by half or more), the amount of fishing pressure has declined by a lot more. This means that there are more walleye per angler fishing Mille Lacs today.

      Q: How is the DNR using science and research to help the walleye population?

      A: Mille Lacs Lake is the most studied lake in Minnesota. It is also a complex and changing system. The agency conducts a large number of surveys on the lake annually. These surveys include assessing the abundance of young walleye; setting 52 nets to assess adult abundance; using fine-mesh nets each summer to determine abundance of food (prey fish) for walleye; and using interviews with anglers around the lake (called creel surveys) to estimate the number of fish anglers are catching. The DNR also periodically tags walleye and other species to provide actual population estimates. We are tagging bass this year in cooperation with angling groups, and will be tagging walleye in 2018 and 2019 when the 2013 year class will be reaching full maturity.

      Q: What is the purpose of the external review the DNR has initiated?

      A: The DNR has asked Dr. Chris Vandergoot to lead an independent review of the DNR’s scientific approaches to manage Mille Lacs Lake. Vandergoot is a key member of the international team that co-manages a very significant walleye fishery in Lake Erie. He works for the U.S. Geological Survey in the Sandusky Lake Erie Biological station in Ohio. His review report will be available to the public in early 2018 and will help inform fisheries management decisions for the 2018 season.

      Q: What does the future look like for Mille Lacs walleye?

      A: It is unlikely that Mille Lacs walleye production will return to the levels that state anglers enjoyed over 20 years ago.  The ecosystem of Mille Lacs is going through extreme change, starting with increased water clarity in the mid-1990s, to impacts today from aquatic invasive species such as spiny water flea and zebra mussels. Longer growing seasons are also helping some species such as smallmouth bass but may be hurting others. While walleye will still be abundant, the future fishery will be more diverse, offering angling opportunities for a greater variety of fish.

      ###
    • Lots of politics.  Probably more info in the mille lacs section 
    • Great info!  I haven't done much trout fishing outside of lake trout, so can you tell me if you're allowed to keep any or all of these fish or is it a catch and release fishery only?
    • So what is going on with Mille Lacs?
    • Anyone have any experiance with these?   http://northernlightsrattlereel.com/    
    • Anyone have any experiance with these?   http://northernlightsrattlereel.com/    
    • They were on right. Just rusted up. I took a sander and cleaned up the blades and auger touched up the flighting with some rustolem gloss black.    What I'm trying to figure out is if the blade mout on this jiffy jet is bent or normal. I'm thinking they are fine/correct. They look like they should be a flat blade, but are curved slightly......It looks like a hybrid between a shaver blade & a lazer blade.    Once I cleaned up the blade I turned them on a sheet of plastic and it cut in well. Guess I'll have to wait until ice to see. 
    •   No just got stickers and stuff sent when I bought stuff. A few years ago I emailed some companies asking for stickers and they sent them free of charge. Used them on my Ice rod case, vexilar pak, and stuff so I could tell which one was mine since others had some of the same gear. Those were leftover stickers so I put them on the Mini fridge. Salmo sent some sweet stickers that were measuring tapes. Put one of those on the counter to measure fish & has a lot of info on it.
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